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13

The video signal is identical in DVI and HDMI. In fact, you can buy cheap (under $5) to convert one to the other. So from a quality perspective, there is no difference. HDMI cables seem slightly more convenient, with smaller connectors. Also, if you plan on hooking it up to other TVs, they are more likely to have HDMI than DVI. On the other hand, if you ...


8

XBMC (the software formerly known as Xbox Media Center) can do most of your requirements except for the recording. MediaPortal is it's bigger and slightly wonkier relative, it can do recording but is in my opinion a bit trickier to set up.


8

No, it will not work. How would you tune channels, for example?


7

Media Poral got plugins, one where it's possible to start other apps, like browser, emulator/games etc. Can do (i think all) your reqeirments and maybe more. Can also handle timeshifting (right word?) and pause the tv-program you are watching etc. As grapefrukt mentiond it's not trivial to setup, but probably what you are looking for.


7

Yes, it's possible to watch TV in a window. All modern tuners and their associated software should be capable of this, whether it's a PCI card or a USB device. Needless to say, you will need a reasonably modern PC to avoid any performance issues or jerkiness. If you have Windows Media Centre, e.g. on Vista Home Premium then you can use that as your viewing ...


4

I've used Tversity. I don't think it allows TV recording, but it excels at transcoding on-the-fly and streaming to UPnP AV/DLNA devices. Then there's XBMC, and Boxee (an XBMC fork). Look through this Lifehacker article for a roundup of media centre options. There's a separate roundup of DVR applications for your TV-watching needs, with some apps featuring ...


4

MediaPortal has been my best choice so far, and has worked well for most all of my uses. Unlike some of the other responses, I found it fairly easily to set up and almost negligible to maintain. I primarily use it to watch recorded or downloaded TV shows and movies, and it works like a charm.


4

No, as others have mentioned this will not work. The two USB ports that are on your monitor are actually connected to your PC (assuming you have the USB cable coming out of your monitor plugged in). They have nothing to do with the actual monitor, rather they are just mounted there for convenience.


4

I have a couple of these. They're PCIEx1 and work very well. Each tuner will allow 4 channels to be recorded at a single time. To record 10-11 channels at a time, you will need at least 3 of these cards. They use to be $400 a pop, but are now down to $200 a piece. You will need to contact your cable provider and get 3 MCards (one for each Ceton card). This ...


4

North American TV transmission formats in a nutshell: NTSC is for analog channels either over-the-air or via cable. ATSC is for digital over-the-air channels. QAM is for digital cable channels. A Clear QAM tuner can receive unencrypted digital cable channels, but often only the local channels are unencrypted. All major over-the-air channels in the USA ...


3

No, that will definitely not work. If you want to bypass the PC altogether, you just need to adapt the signal path. This DVI to RCA Component adapter will do the trick. If you need to go to Composite, you'll need this too. This setup still won't be ideal, because you won't have a tuner either, as there is not one built into your monitor. I did however find ...


3

I purchased the HDHomeRun Networked Digital TV Tuner and we'll see how well it works with Windows Media Center.


2

I do no think the All in Wonder card is actually the culprit here, at least not in the way you might at first think. I believe the problem is actually the copy protection the they are putting on the video. This is known as HDCP which stands for High-bandwidth Digital Copy Protection. When you are both imputing and outputting the TV signal through the same ...


2

GBPVR is a free pvr for windows. It allows you to record TV shows and play them back using a TV Tuner card. It also allows you to view photos and play MP3s back using a single interface. In addition it allows for plugins. More information is available at the link at the beginning of the answer.


2

Have a look at CCExtractor. You need to compile it from source though. It takes MPEG files as input, so you'll need to save the input stream somewhere and try it out.


2

TV Tuners are just a kind of PROPER receivers of TV signals through cable/wireless medium. If you have a wired connection to your TV right now, you just need to plug that wire into the TVTuner slot of PC. You also need a software to view the actual TV. Most cases, TVTuner bundles appropriate software with them. I own a Pinnacle PCTV Analog which comes with ...


2

I use a "dedicated" home theater PC running Vista Media Center with a Hauppagge WinTV HVR-1800, and an over-the-air antenna to watch HDTV. Sometimes I'll watch in Windowed mode while browsing on a second monitor. AV Science Forum is a great resource on home theater PCs and AV hobby in general.


2

Maybe hulu fits your needs, you don't need any fancy tuner hardware. If you really do want to build your own computer-TV/DVR then you'll need an ATSC/ClearQAM/NTSC tuner device. Hauppauge makes some of the best under their "WinTV" line, though there are plenty of other options. Generally speaking most tuner cards come bundled with software that will let you ...


2

If it is anything like Sky digital in the UK, this is not possible. (Example based on Sky Digital) The two cables are each connected to a different output on the LNB (the part at the end of the dish) and it is not a one way signal - the box can only receive on either 11Ghz or 12Ghz then scan vertical or horizontal at once (so one of four). This is why when ...


2

I am confused, you say you want to split the coax but you aren't telling us what coax you are talking about. You have: [Dish] -- coax -- [DVR] -- hdmi -- [TV] And you want: [Dish] -- coax -- [DVR] -- hdmi -- [TV] | +----- [PC] ----------- [Monitor] I don't think you can split the coax from the dish and feed it to your Hauppauge. ...


2

I have one too! Definitely use Windows Media Center (WMC) but don't forget the IR remote control TSR (it lives in your systray) if you have a hand held remote control and want to use it with your Hauppauge TV card. You don't need to install the entire WinTV application from Hauppauge to get IR remote control functionality either. Just download the IR remote ...


2

To use a television signal you need a tuner. If your monitor doesn't have a tuner built in then you can not hook a television signal into it. Some monitors have tuners in them that are marketed as Television Monitors and have various inputs such as coaxial and HDMI in. No matter how much you twist your cord coming from the wall or set-top box to fit into ...


2

There aren't any more issues with TV cards than on any other expansion card. Basically every expansion card which has any input/output can destroy your motherboard if you improperly connect it (like for example connecting power cord into antenna input). TV cards aren't inherently any more dangerous than say fax modems or network cards, so I wouldn't worry ...


2

Yes you can. There really aren't any caveats; most dual TV tuners are recognized as separate devices to the computer anyway. EDIT: And apparently, you can add even more.


2

Make sure you pick the right signal type for what is piped down that coax socket. If it is standard definition analogue NTSC then you need a TV card that understands SD analogue NTSC. Ask the college - they should be able to tell you the standards present. Don't bother with an internal antenna of your own unless the college is in a very strong signal area - ...


2

Well, you really need to know what is going to go trough the antenna cable. ATSC is the new American digital television standard. As far as I know, they are shutting down analogue TV in America, so it would be smart o look for a card that has that. NTSC is old analogue television standard primarily used in US influenced countries mostly in Asia and ...


2

There should be no problems with what you want to do and no extenders needed, assuming both of the following are true: The PC you want to view the content on can reach the network location where the programmes are recorded There is sufficient bandwidth between them to stream the content without buffering issues I have a similar if opposite setup (Vista ...


2

Perhaps one of the tuner cards has audio problems. This might be a driver issue, not likely to be a hardware problem. Determine which of the cards has a problem: Try unplugging the antenna cable from one of the tuners, then watch some TV. If the sound is consistently missing on all channels, you've found the defective card: it's the one that still has the ...


2

Have you tried (version of Windows depending) Media Center? It is free and comes with Windows Home Premium and above!


2

You will need a card with twin tuners to be able to watch/record multiple channels. Hauppauge do a wide range of products including twin tuner and are fairly reasonable on price. I have had 4 different cards of theirs over the years and always been happy.



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