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I need to be able to run apps as administrator AND use the metro apps This is impossible. The Store apps run sandboxed and this sandbox requires a turned on UAC. Use the Task scheduler workaround to start applications as admin without accepting an UAC prompt.


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You could disable UAC entirely from control panel which will effectively run with the privileges you currently have to grant manually you can adjust the level of UAC to suit your needs. In decending order of strength, the settings are as follows : Set as Never notify [If logged on as an admin-level user everything is automatically given elevated ...


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Try booting into "safe mode with command prompt" then at a command prompt type net user administrator /active: yes. Then reboot normally. You should then be able to log into the default administrator account without a password to make any needed changes. If you want to go back to where you were, you can use net user administrator /active: no


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This cannot be done. UAC only accepts credentials of user accounts that are valid on the computer, whether they be local or domain accounts. In order to prompt for a password that is different from the one used by your logon account, you must create/use another account.


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Changing the access rights for the User group to full control for the hosts file allowed me to save it without having to run stuff as administrator. The fact that my account is an administrator, and the administrators had full control of the file didn't allow me to edit it. Makes no sense. Go Windows!


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The many people above me laid it out pretty clearly: Copy to Desktop, Edit with Notepad and Save, Copy Back Which Would Overwrite the Previous Host File Disable UAC Launch cmd as an Administrator and than Type In "notepad..." Use the Local Users and Group Manager (Ill Advised) Option one on my list is how people have been doing it for years. There's only ...


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Copy the hosts file to your desktop edit it, save it in the same place and then copy it back to system32\drivers\etc. the UAC popup answer with yes. that's it.


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When you logon, you get handed a "Kerberos" token which defines your user as both administrator and user - regardless of what control panel tells you. You can use local user manager (C:\windows\system32\lusrmgr.msc) to remove yourself from the users group and only be present in the administrators group - but this may cause more hassle than its worth. ...


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I would not recommend doing this but if you give your user Full Control on that file it should work as you want it to. This is a security risk though, please think carefully if you really need this.


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Just because you are an Administrative user, does not mean that everything you do, you do as an administrator; it simply means that you have the ability to do so. By default, your user runs just the same as any other user would, as themself. When you try and preform administrative tasks - certain applications will be run with administrative privileges ...


5

After a week of trying everything. The answer as weird as it sounds it's to enable the windows firewall. I, know makes no sense right? It's not connected to font settings, however once "On" I was able to fix My issue with installing fonts on windows 10 and not a valid font message!


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Win 10 using Malwarebytes. Malware apparently was turning off the UAC at startup. Stopped loading it at startup and the issue appeared to resolve. Then adjusted startup to delay in Malwarebytes setup and it appeared to work.


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From the answer linked by BigChris, it looks like the yes/no prompt is called "Admin Approval Mode". This is controlled through the local policy. Launch Local Group Policy Editor (Run > gpedit.msc) and expand Local Computer Policy > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Local Policies > Security Options. Scroll to the bottom of the content ...


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I got around this problem by launching the install through an elevated command prompt


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It sounds like your factory default backup disc should work fine. The Windows 7 system repair disk will try to fix problems with Windows boot but won't systematically check for permission issues on the entire drive. Alternatively, you could attempt to repair the permission issues by taking ownership of all files on the entire system (any local ...


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Turns out, the problem is that the SSD the OS was installed on was losing it's mind, and corrupted various parts of the install.


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After much research, and even a C# app that uses DLL hooks to automatically grab the UAC confirmation window and click the or press the "Yes" button, the solution is to disable UAC completely, and the MS account (for faster login). Why? Because: Cortana isn't any more useful than "ask Google" it's weird to talk at your computer unless you're showing it ...


1

The Store apps and all apps that use the WinRT libraries require enabled UAC. The UAC provides the sandbox to isolate the Apps and prevent bad apps from harm your device. If you don't want UAC, you can't use the Store Apps. This is the same like in Windows 8/8.1



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