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6

This happen when somehow we'd lost the keys. To solve i have executed the first step listed here https://www.spotify.com/de/download/linux/ That is: sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv-keys 94558F59 D2C19886


5

The man page does not list uid or gid options for ext2, 3 and 4 filesystems. On these filesystems the file permissions don't depend on who mounted the filesystem or on mount options, only on the metadata stored within the filesystem.


3

The link is to /dev/sda1. you can establish that with the file command: in my system, for instance, # file * ff28e743-4409-41b3-99ea-f133cdcc86be: symbolic link to `../../sda1' Thus, your option b is right. /dev/sda is not a link, hence it does not point to anything else at all: it is just a special (device) file, see for instance this Wikipedia ...


3

Device naming is performed as the devices are initialised by the kernel - so no, naming is not persistent. Commonly UUIDs are used to identify disks, as /dev/sdX is subject to change. One can use udev to recognise disks by their serial number (or some other attribute) and create a symlink in /dev , for example /dev/mydisk1. There are a number of ways that ...


3

In the Insert menu, Special character..., pick "Greek" in the right-hand drop-down, and you'll find Ω near the middle. Or just copy-and-paste the symbol in the previous sentence...


2

On my Linux Mint 17 system I can type Ctrl+Shift+U and then 2, 1, 2, 6, Enter (the unicode hex value) to get it in LibreOffice Writer. I often find it easier to google for the unicode value of a symbol than to search for it in a table.


2

As noted, you should correct the $File typo. Depending on what you do with the output, you may not need the if test at all. You say you would like the IP address stored in a variable: file=$1 echo $file ip=$(grep -e DN $1 | awk '{ print $2; }') echo $ip This can be simplified a lot further for what it's worth, but it matches what you have already. Note ...


1

You need to mark your file as executable: "chmod +x /home/supreeth/Documents/Untitled1"


1

Use the sed command. sed 's/.fr.*//' file_name.txt Explanation: sed will remove the part of the line matching the regular expression .fr.* from each line in the file, thus leaving the content before .fr. .fr.* means .fr. followed by anything.


1

You can use a positive lookahead regex: echo "g-82.text.text1.fr.worker1" | grep -Po '.*(?=.fr)' echo "g-xx.yyyyyy.zzzz.fr.worker2" | grep -Po '.*(?=.fr)' Documentation here: http://www.rexegg.com/regex-lookarounds.html


1

Try cut -d'.' -f-3 <file_name.txt -d defines the "field delimiter", Do put it inside '-quotes, so it is "safe from bash" (some characters has special meaning in bash, this is the means to avoid trouble) Effect here -> split at . chars. -f defines which "fields" to keep, => -3 => Effect here: all from the beginning up to and including the third. man ...


1

Piping output of a command to a variable.. A simple example a bit like yours $ a=$(echo abc | grep -o a) $ echo $a a So in your case $ line=asdf.fr $ a=$(echo $line | grep -Po '.*(?=.fr)') $ echo $a asdf $ Your line failed because it expanded the line variable $line, and executed it which writes an error to stderr and nothing to stdout. All the $ ...


1

First, I'd like to be very clear on an important distinction: Partitions are simply pointers to where partitions begin and end. On modern disks, these start and end points are expressed as sector values. Filesystems are complex data structures that reside within partitions (or other containers). Typically, filesystems are defined relative to the start ...


1

You can use the environment variables PWD and HOME: $PWD is the current working directory, while $HOME is the current user's home directory. You can precede the executable statements in your script by: if [ "$PWD" != "$HOME" ]; then exit; fi You can optionally add an error code to the exit command, in case the calling shell wants to check the success or ...


1

so i was looking for a way to mount a usb device and give an unprivileged user the right to create files and manipulate them, since it is impossible to change uid on a linux partition, the solution here is to use bindfs bindfs allow us to mount a directory to another location and alter permission bits sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt here only root can create ...


1

In Ubuntu, which I understand you have available, in the directory /etc/udev/rules.d, there is a README file which states: package-supplied rules ... can be found in /lib/udev/rules.d ... So, now # ls -lhd /lib/udev/rules.d/*disk* -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 8,0K giu 10 18:58 /lib/udev/rules.d/80-udisks2.rules -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 10K mar 10 2014 ...


1

Since you have the exact same same Ubuntu version installed on both the liveCD and external USB device ... you might be able to get away with the following: Mount your USB device somewhere (for the example I'm using /mnt/your_USB_device though it will probably be somewhere on /media...) Then, from a root terminal: for f in dev dev/pts proc sys; do mount ...


1

I've found at least two reasons for this error message: the first is a syntax error and the second is that the conf file didn't exist when you booted so Upstart will refuse to run it. To make sure your conf file syntax is correct run: init-checkconf -d /etc/init/script.conf It will print out a bunch of stuff and near the end it should say: File ...


1

I'm dealing with different app configuration per server type directly at the top file. # per server hostname : ie. base: 'websrv*': - oraclejava - tomcat - iptables-persistent - postgresql - apache 'monsrv*': - snort - pulledpork - barnyard - snorby - apache - mysql If your minions naming doesn't allow ...


1

Xfce stores its config in ~/.config/xfce4/xfconf/xfce-perchannel-xml/. This files needs to be saved for backup. If you want to apply those settings, you can either copy the appropriate file in this directory while not logged in in xfce (because those files are not watched for changes and will be overwritten on a new save event) or you translate the settings ...


1

I don't know the specifics of why this worked, but I reset BIOS from the boot-up options there, and could then install this ISO. I really don't recall ever modifying BIOS, but perhaps this did occur somewhere down the line.



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