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2

There is a free software I use a lot which is EasyBCD. It allows you to completely customize Windows bootloader. What I suggest is: Use it to set your bootloader to Windows bootloader (using the "Write MBR" function, in "BCD Deployment") Upgrade to Windows 10 Use EasyBCD again to set up a dual boot between Windows and Ubuntu I have used this software on ...


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Questions 1 and 3 are related and can be answered at a time. As per the grep man page (emphasis mine): --exclude-dir=DIR Exclude directories matching the pattern DIR from recursive searches. So basically what you specify with that option is a pattern and not a directory itself, meaning /var/www/sometext* or even /var/www/sometext/* will expand and ...


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Giving the guest full GPU access is probably not possible. If a virtual machine had direct access to your GPU, bad stuffs would happen because sharing memory between two effectively different computers is not a thing; pointers and addresses and whatnot would be very different between them. (No consumer-available card supports servicing two computers at once.)...


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I believe you need a host-only network: https://www.virtualbox.org/manual/ch06.html#network_hostonly First, be sure to create the network interface in the main VirtualBox interface: File -> Preferences: Network -> Host-only Networks To access the network interfaces on the VM, the IP address range is typically, by default, in the range 192.168.56....


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Let's assume your in your directory the presence of the files 1.a,2.a,3.a. With the command ls *.a | xargs -I{} echo {} | sed 's/.a//' you have no subshells, the output of ls is piped in xargs that make its substitutions. Then the output is piped to sed. From here your first result. With the command ls *.a | xargs -I{} bash -c "echo {} $(echo {} | ...


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I agree with you completely I was in the same position a couple weeks ago. It is the dual boot, what I did was physically unplug the sata power and data cables (just to be safe) from the disk containing Grub and in my case a copy of Centos 7, then I allowed Windows 10 to install itself and then after wards plugged the disk back in and everything worked like ...


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As the computer starts, Press F2 or Delete to enter BIOS and check the time there. If it's not showing correct time change it. Save and exit BIOS, check if it works. Another reason can be a week cmos or motherboard battery, replace it.


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Open a terminal and type this command # pkexec visudo Enter the root password Edd the following line to sudoers file after this line root ALL=(ALL) ALL add this line username ALL=(ALL)ALL This worked for me. Then try to log in as root and type this command # sudo -s Enter the root password and go on.



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