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Your system has a UEFI firmware. Because of this, Windows requires you to format your hard drive as a GPT disk instead of an MBR disk (which you have). GPT disks do not have the concept of an "Active" partition the way MBR disks do. That's why the option is grayed out. In a BIOS world with MBR disks, the computer simply boots to whatever partition has the ...


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The UEFI Shell is a regular .efi program, which you can download. Store it at \SHELLX64.EFI or a similar path on the EFI filesystem, and add it to the UEFI boot manager the usual way.


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As far as I understand, I can install one Windows system on each drive, because Windows need to create an EFI boot partition (and an MSR, whatever that is). A second installation will refuse to install if there is already an EFI boot partition. That shouldn't be the reason. It is quite normal to share a single EFI system partition across several ...


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What you want to do is possible; I've seen posts from people who've done it. I've not done it myself, though. As grawity says, your error message is a result of your first installation being in EFI/UEFI mode and your (accidentally/mistakenly) booting the second installation in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode. You must learn the procedure to force your system to boot ...


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Good on ya for being informed on UEFI. What version of Windows are you using? Win8 correct? ~ Do you get a GRUB bootloader, at least, on the second new drive? If yes, you may just need a simple, default, Win startup repair to reevaluate the Windows boot sectors (beginning and ending) after a Linux installation. Additionally, "Linux" doesn't always play ...


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This sounds like a boot order issue, each time the hard drive is swapped the boot order will have to be changed in bios. UEFI entries in bios are separate from Legacy hard disks in the bios boot order. Each time you disconnect the UEFI disk and replace it with the legacy disk its entry will be deleted from the boot order. After installing the UEFI disk you ...


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It's possible, but not certain, that you'll be able to boot the image you copied using my rEFInd boot manager. You can test this without installing anything to your hard disk by downloading the USB flash drive or CD-R image, preparing a boot medium with it, and booting it. If you're lucky, you'll see one or more entries for the Linux kernel(s) and/or the EFI ...


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If you are using the Windows USB/DVD download tool, you have to manually add EFI support. Search for it on Google or give Rufus a try.


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Check for VeraCrypt, seems that they will continue development of TrueCrypt. Note1: What i see is that they took the source code of TrueCrypt and continue from there. Note2: I do not know if VeraCrypt supports UEFI (GPT discs)



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