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107

I've spent a lot of time trying to get my Windows 8 PC to boot again after cloning to a new SSD and try to summarise how I finally got it all working - Firstly, boot from a UEFI Windows 8 recovery disk (CD/DVD/USB) - I found that the automated recovery process didn't find the correct Windows partition, nor when I managed to add it to BCD settings would it ...


67

First of all, the simple answer to your question: If you have an ARM tablet running Windows RT (like the Surface RT or the Asus Vivo RT), then you will not be able to disable Secure Boot or install other OSes. Like many other ARM tablets, these devices will only run the OS they come with. If you have a non-ARM computer running Windows 8 (like the Surface ...


51

As we all know that BIOS is important part for accessing boot option. So now UEFI will do that? How? BIOS boots by reading the first sector on a hard disk and executing it; this boot sector in turn locates and runs additional code. The BIOS system is very limiting because of space constraints and because BIOS runs 16-bit code, whereas modern ...


45

Boot your computer with a live-usb/CD in UEFI mode. I had two boot options <flash_drive> and UEFI: <flash_drive>, the second is needed to expose the efi variables in /sys/firmware/efi/ so that efibootmgr don't fail later on. Booting with the first option gives me the following error: Fatal: Couldn't open either sysfs or procfs directories for ...


31

Did you happen to use Apple's Disk Utility to create a FAT filesystem in that to-be-Windows partition? If so, you converted the disk from a legal GPT disk into a hybrid MBR disk, which OS X sees as GPT and Windows sees as MBR. The solution in this case is to clear the hybrid MBR data. A number of utilities can do this. I'll describe how to do it with my own ...


23

First, you're conflating two or three different things (perhaps because of poorly worded program messages): Firmware type -- Old PCs used the Basic Input/Output System (BIOS), but new computers use the Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) or its newer variant, the Unified EFI (UEFI). The main duty of both the BIOS and the EFI is to start the boot process, ...


22

Your computer has UEFI firmware, a replacement for the old BIOS (although it still has support for BIOS-only operating systems). In BIOS systems, the bootloader (or the "stage1" of a large bootloader) is stored inside the MBR, in the zeroth sector of the disk. (The 512-byte MBR reserves 446 bytes for bootstrap code, the rest is used for partition ...


22

OK, it was a very involving process, but I solved my problem and everything works together just as it should. I'm documenting the solution for everyone: One must begin with GParted Live and create a fresh GPT partition table. This will wipe everything on the HDD resp. SSD. Then one must create a small 8 MB 'unpartitioned' partition and flag it with ...


17

To get the DVD drive to show up in the boot menu, you might need to go into the BIOS (actually (U)EFI Settings) and enable Legacy (BIOS) Mode or the UEFI Compatibility Support Module (CSM) or similarly worded option: (Screenshot of Asus Zenbook Prime UX31A-DH51 BIOS with CSM disabled.) (Screenshot of Asus K55A BIOS with CSM enabled.) Note: You might ...


14

From what I know UEFI is an operating system in itself which then runs Windows UEFI is as complex as an operating system, but it is incorrect to say that UEFI runs the operating system after it's loaded - even though there's many online texts that would create that impression. Simplifying a bit, the right way to express how UEFI and Windows coexist is ...


13

There are several differences between BIOS-mode and EFI-mode booting: On new computers, a BIOS-mode boot is likely to take longer than an EFI-mode boot (by a few seconds). Each mode has its own boot loaders and boot managers. In BIOS mode, you've got LILO, GRUB Legacy, GRUB 2, BURG, SYSLINUX, and a few others for Linux. In EFI mode, you've got ELILO, ...


13

The CD is not offered as a boot option because Secure Boot is enabled. Before you can boot from a CD, you must do the following: Upon powering on the laptop, press F10 Select the option to modify the BIOS settings Go to the Boot Options screen Set Secure Boot to Disabled Set BIOS mode to UEFI and Legacy or CSM and UEFI OS Save settings and reboot When the ...


13

Open a command prompt (as an administrator), and run: bcdedit /enum This will enumerate the BCD settings, you'll get an output similar to this one: Windows Boot Manager -------------------- identifier {bootmgr} device partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume1 description Windows Boot Manager locale en-US ...


11

As we all know that BIOS is important part for accessing boot option. So now UEFI will do that? How? UEFI is an interface. It can be implemented on top of a traditional BIOS or on top of non-BIOS implementations. How would I know that I'm booting with UEFI not with BIOS? If you have a UEFI-compatible motherboard, in the boot menu, ...


11

The other answers are helpful but this is what I had to do to fix mine. I had a 1.5 TB hard drive with Windows 7 installed on it. I then installed Windows 8 onto a 150 GB SSD I bought. The 1.5 TB hard drive failed and I could hear it making a noise, my computer would no longer start, saying "please insert system disk". I thought that the bootloader was ...


11

Here is what i did with help from nix-dev mailing list. Initial setup MacBook 5,1 (2008) with Mac OS 10.9 and hard drive partitioned as follows: a) 200MB EFI System Partition labelled "EFI". b) Two partitions used by Mac OS (10.9). c) Two empty ext4 partitions labelled "nixos" and "home", and a Linux Swap partition labelled "swap". Here is my ...


10

Solved :) The cause seems to be a strange feature in the UEFI implementation, which can also be seen in the Open Source TianoCore implementation: https://github.com/tianocore/edk2/blob/master/IntelFrameworkModulePkg/Library/GenericBdsLib/BdsMisc.c#L1425 I ultimately found it after diffing my EFI variable dumps after the last 21MB "loss" and finding ...


10

It's tricky to switch between BIOS-mode and EFI-mode OSes on a single computer; for best results, you should keep both OSes in one boot mode. Your best bet is to install an EFI-mode boot loader for Mint. Several are available, but installation can be tricky. Specific options you might want to try include the following: Use Ubuntu's "Boot Repair" tool (I ...


9

Now, I'll cut to the chase and show you how to find this log file. I have done this with a retail Windows Vista DVD disc, just for the purpose of demonstrating this. But this should be the same even if you boot from a USB flash drive, or if you use Windows 7. When you boot from a Windows DVD or USB you will first see a dialog where you choose language and ...


9

Do you suggest to enable UEFI boot? Yes, for one very simple reason: It will make you used to the way that things are more than likely going to be done as standard on your next personal computer, and are already done as standard on other lines of personal computers such as Intel Macintoshes. The advantages and disadvantages of firmwares are not ...


9

Yes. Windows 8 will support BIOS without UEFI. We will continue to support the legacy BIOS interface, but machines using the UEFI interface will have significantly richer capabilities. The quote is from Microsoft's Building Windows 8 Developers Blog title: Reengineering the Windows boot experience. It was just posted yesterday.


8

No, a partition is not one and the same as a file; and Wikipedia is misleading you. That second paragraph is wrong on pretty much all points. EFI does not require any such things, and never relies upon a boot sector. If you want the gen on this, I suggest reading the actual EFI specification. It's fairly clear on what the \EFI\BOOT\BOOTxxx.EFI files are ...


7

There will be an extra UEFI partition on the hard drive, It may be hidden, if you can get a look at the files in the partition there will be some with an .efi file extension. Different manufactures label the partitions differently, mine is labeled "HP_TOOLS" I agree with William, all the new laptops I have seen in the last 2 years have UEFI EDIT: Another ...


7

(U)EFI-based systems, by specification, can only boot from GPT-style disks. The traditional BIOS can boot from MBR-style disks, and in some cases (depends on the manufacturer), they can also boot from GPT. However, as per the UEFI specification, the disk should have a GPT partition table. This MSDN article describes it well: Systems that support UEFI ...


7

I ran into the same error on an Asus UX21E machine. The latest BIOS (v 214) didn't fix the trick, and my USB disk was properly prepared as a EFI boot devices. I was able to work around the problem using a hack I found on a related thread on the ArchLinux BBS. The gist of it is that since this system shipped with Windows 7 it doesn't have Secure Boot stuff ...


7

The last time they even put out an update was almost 2 years ago. I really don't think there is even any development on it anymore. According to their site Windows 8 is not supported at all. Here is the supported OSs page. http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/supported-operating-systems I am currently using Bitlocker for one encrypted drive. Bitlocker is native ...


6

Although TrueCrypt have announced their intentions to support Windows 8 and UEFI, their last version still dates from 2012. As far as I can see, your options today are : Partition your disk into two parts, Windows and TrueCrypt. If you are worried about unauthorized boot of your computer, put a password on the BIOS. Use BitLocker instead of TrueCrypt, if ...


6

Firstly, you will need an EFI-booted linux system. If you still have your original install media (CD/DVD/USB stick), that should usually include an adequate rescue system. It might even have a one-click repair option :). Alternatively, the Ubuntu community provides an automatic boot-repair image. It claims to support Fedora. If you want to know what it ...


6

I have asked this question so that people can have fun with the discussion that follows. As I post this text as an answer, here are three possible ways to achieve this: Having UEFI Secure Boot deleting the Microsoft key and adding keys used by GNU/Linux bootloaders (As of Frank Thomas' comment) Using another processor architecture than x86 or windows 8 ...


6

Your "hidden" 1GiB partition is a Microsoft System Reserved partition. This is a Poor Man's equivalent to a system partition. It isn't a true system partition, and it isn't an EFI System Partition. The boot manager that it contains is the Microsoft Boot Manager. However it is your system partition. Delete it and your machine will be unbootable. As ...



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