Hot answers tagged

9

It doesn't make sense to dd a Windows ISO to a USB drive. It's simply not supposed to be bootable this way. For the PC to boot a USB drive, the drive needs to have either a MBR with proper boot code for hard disks, but not ISO9660/UDF, for BIOS/CSM, or a proper FAT-formatted ESP for UEFI. The simplest way to make a bootable Windows installation USB for UEFI,...


7

To answer the questions: The licenses are stored in the Microsoft Data Management (MSDM) and SLIC in the ACPI table of the device (located in the BIOS/UEFI - this information is backed up by a forum post on answers.miscrosoft.com by a Microsoft Support Engineer). You can apparently (according to this lenovo forum post, and to a removed comment) read/write ...


6

First of all, make sure you have a regular (single-architecture) Windows ISO. It seems you already have that covered. Then, try this method: Create a Setup USB drive Create a file named PID.txt in the Sources directory, with the following contents: [PID] Value=YOURK-EYGOE-SHERE-XXXXX-XXXXX Boot from this USB drive


5

This is comon problem in all lenovo laptops. I also have faced this problem so many times. For solving this please goto link i provided (link of oficial lenovo support site) and download latest bios setup and install it it will updte your bios and all will be all right. download bios setfor window 8.1 and install it the manual also given in pdf format. http:/...


5

DreamSpark license doesn't permit installing on hardware that doesn't have a valid Windows license. You can install Windows with a product key provided by DreamSpark only on virtual machines and machines that already have a valid Windows license (so to upgrade either Windows version or edition, or for a clean non-OEM install). Microsoft DreamSpark Direct ...


4

Is TianoCore+coreboot a true open source UEFI? For Intel platforms(I have done development for Intel boards and I cannot speak for AMD though I believe the case is still the same), no, because TianoCore by itself cannot perform low level hardware initialization and requires coreboot to do this hardware init first. But how does coreboot do this? coreboot ...


4

I'm the author of the GPT fdisk partitioning software, so I know this subject pretty well. Previous answers have promoted some misconceptions that I'd like to address.... If you want a partition size greater than 2TB, you must use GPT instead of MBR. Probably. The catch is that that MBR maxes out at 2^32 sectors. This translates to 2 TiB (not 2 TB; see ...


4

The official UEFI spec [warning: 13 MiB PDF] doesn't even say that FAT32 is supported - it defines a filesystem called "EFI System Partition" that "happens" to be compatible with FAT32 and says to assign it a GPT partition type of C12A7328-F81F-11D2-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B and an MBR partition ID of 0xEF (previously more or less unused). From §12.3.1 (File System ...


4

Windows 7 does not support Secure Boot, leave it off. "Secure Boot is a security standard developed by members of the PC industry to help make sure that your PC boots using only software that is trusted by the PC manufacturer." When the PC starts, the firmware checks the signature of each piece of boot software, including firmware drivers (Option ROMs) and ...


3

First, there are two features of the firmware that are likely to be useful to you. (You have a firmware, not a BIOS, although many people and even manufacturers mis-apply the term "BIOS" to non-BIOS firmware) Firmware setup utility -- This is what you seem to be trying to enter. You can use it to permanently set the boot order and adjust many other ...


3

First, you should understand what's going on: A computer boots by running its firmware code (BIOS or EFI), which in turn runs a boot loader program stored on the hard disk. The boot loader relies on features of the firmware (BIOS or EFI), and so is tied to the firmware type -- you can't run an EFI boot loader under BIOS or vice-versa. There is one partial ...


3

In most Linux distributions, the simplest way to do this is to check for the presence of a directory called /sys/firmware/efi: $ ls -F /sys/firmware acpi/ efi/ memmap/ If it's present, as in this example, then you're booted in EFI mode. If it's absent, then you've probably booted in BIOS mode; however, there are ways to boot in EFI mode and to not have ...


3

If your motherboard is doing that its doing, then you have either: a) Faulty CSM: Here's a link from Asus on how to remove the need for CSM by switching to UEFI / GPT to potentially isolate the fault: http://rog.asus.com/tag/disable-csm/ One you have switched to native UEFI support by switching to a GPT boot disk, your motherboard's Compatibility Support ...


3

Chances are you were booting in just one mode all along. One of the problems with the built-in EFI boot managers is that they don't always do what you think. When you select Option A in the boot manager, it might try that option, but then if that option fails, it might start going through its regular boot order, so you might end up booting via Option B or ...


3

Annoyingly some USB drives aren't boot compatible with some computers and the only way to find out is try several USB drives, do you have any others to try, Sandisk seems to to good here?


3

You need to disable fastboot in Windows 10. You are not cold booting at the moment. If you cold boot, you will be able to use F2 as usual. Use HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Power HiberbootEnabled DWORD 0 = Turn off fast startup 1 = Turn on fast startup and then boot again to access the BIOS.


2

Addition of some info on Boot from Windows 10, Windows To Go for UEFI vs Legacy | 32 vs 64 bit. https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt185782(v=vs.85).aspx Checking for architectural compatibility between the host PC and the Windows To Go drive In addition to the USB boot support in the BIOS, the Windows 10 image on your Windows To Go ...


2

It is possible. I have an option in my BIOS to either boot UEFI first or Legacy first. I have installed Ubuntu in UEFI mode from a USB live disk (first) and Windows 7 not in UEFI (MBR) from a DVD. This has resulted in 2 x 100mb partitions and I can switch OS's via the BIOS. I found this accidentally but it works. As neither OS realises it is in a dual boot ...


2

Short answer: No; you cannot make Hiren's Boot CD EFI compatible. Even when Hiren's uses Syslinux and it is true Syslinux 6.03 now supports UEFI (syslinux.efi) you will face at least 2 problems when upgrading your Hiren's CD to Syslinux 6.03: syslinux.efi is not an UEFI signed application then forget about the SecureBoot scenario. Syslinux.efi (as the ...


2

Well, the OS is what installs the bootloader in the first place, so clearly it has some control over it. UEFI firmwares have an integrated boot manager, which stores the menu choices and other parameters as EFI variables such as Boot0001, BootOrder, BootNext. They're stored in the same NVRAM as other firmware settings – in fact, many firmware settings are ...


2

No, to both. Systemd-boot cannot read any partitions outside its own. However, you should not have more than one EFI partition per disk (its file layout was explicitly designed to be shared between different operating systems).


2

I was just about to "bite the bullet" as @moab suggested and do a full reinstall. This is after trying quite a few things and seeing all of them fail, likely for the same reason looking back on it. I intended to, but in the end did not have to, reinstall Windows 10. Here are the key steps. Note: I believe that at least some of my pain, and the particulars ...


2

Your hard disk is GPT style disk. I don't see EFI system partition(ESP), Microsoft Reserved Partition(MSR) - have you deleted them too ? Also why is the OS partition hidden ? Complete mess. You have 1512 MB free on start of disk there you should create 2 partitions: EFI system partition - at least 100 MB. MSR exactly 128 MB. Use diskpart for creating ...


2

As you request a clear illustration of how to do it, here it is. I assume you have your live Linux booted. Partition the USB thumb drive I recommend the command line tool gdisk. It produces very clean results. Alternatively, you can use gparted. Create a new partiton table. Use GPT with a protective MBR. Define these partitions: (optional) A data ...


2

EFIs have built-in boot managers. Their user interfaces vary greatly, from completely useless to moderately useful, but the key point is that each entry in the built-in boot manager tells the firmware how to launch one program (normally a boot loader). These boot manager entries are stored in NVRAM. Ordinarily, when you install an OS, it creates an EFI boot ...


2

There is no difference – neither extension is actually defined to mean anything specific, and most of the time they mean the same thing. X.509 certificates have just one "main" storage format, which is DER. It can be however Base64-encoded (aka PEM-encoded) or not (raw DER). A .crt file can really be either. So first take a look at the files' contents. If ...


2

It cannot be done, see this Introduction to Grub2 which states explicitly: Important: Keyboard Layout during the Boot Procedure The US keyboard layout is the only one available when booting


2

Here are the figures for several boot loaders from one of my systems: OpenSUSE (GRUB): 3.5 MiB Mint 17.2 (GRUB): 3.4 MiB rEFInd 0.10.0: 1.3 MiB Windows 7: 18 MiB Windows 10: 23 MiB Despite the small size of the space occupied by the OS boot loaders, I recommend keeping an ESP of 550 MiB, for several reasons: OS boot loader needs may change. They may ...


2

Windows 7 doesn't support the new UEFI GOP (Graphics Output Protocol) and requires VGA option ROM (BIOS interrupt 10 (INT 10H)). Win8/10 supports GOP and reads the UEFI Logo and displays it during boot for a smoother boot And it seams that your UEFI always turn GOP on and disables VGA so Win7 can't be used and hangs at Starting Windows which the graphic ...


2

Secure Boot should not prevent booting from a USB drive per se, although it should prevent booting an unsigned boot loader from any disk. I don't happen to know offhand if Kali provides a signed or unsigned boot loader, so this might or might not be your problem. You should be able to disable Secure Boot from the firmware setup utility. If you can't do so, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible