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14

From what I know UEFI is an operating system in itself which then runs Windows UEFI is as complex as an operating system, but it is incorrect to say that UEFI runs the operating system after it's loaded - even though there's many online texts that would create that impression. Simplifying a bit, the right way to express how UEFI and Windows coexist is ...


10

Here is what i did with help from nix-dev mailing list. Initial setup MacBook 5,1 (2008) with Mac OS 10.9 and hard drive partitioned as follows: a) 200MB EFI System Partition labelled "EFI". b) Two partitions used by Mac OS (10.9). c) Two empty ext4 partitions labelled "nixos" and "home", and a Linux Swap partition labelled "swap". Here is my ...


6

Power-on Self Test or POST is part of the part of the preboot sequence. It tests for common hardware faults. Generally the results of the POST are indicated by audible beeps. Some more advanced hardware, such as motherboards marketed to overclockers, may have a digital readout that displays a code.


5

The major advantages that UEFI provides are: 1. Better disk support: UEFI supports GPT (GUID Partitioned Table), which adds support for very large hard drives (e.g. those in excess of 2TB.). BIOS uses MBR, which had a size limitation of 2TB because of 32bit tables. UEFI has 64bit tables allowing the boot devices to be larger than 2TB. This has a lot of ...


5

This problem is resolved in my 10 years old HP desktop (4 cores), with drive: 3TB Western Digital Green, but it should be the same with Seagate too. I added the solution to this blog: Post Anything Here. In a nutshell you need 2 things to do: to install the Intel RAID driver (free). to use a good tool for extending the partition to the maximum size, ...


4

The latest version of Rufus allows seamless UEFI boot from an NTFS partition. If you select a Windows installation ISO, set the partition scheme to GPT partition scheme for UEFI computers and also set the file system to NTFS, Rufus will add everything required to allow booting NTFS partition from an UEFI system. Outside of using Windows installation media, ...


4

It's possible, and it's very frequently done with both external USB sticks and internal drives. Regarding partition table types: BIOS normally doesn't need any partition table. It is only interested in the bootstrap code part that is the first 440 bytes of your MBR. (Although there are exceptions. Some BIOS implementations actually do break if they cannot ...


4

Google searches turned up tips like "you have to boot the DVD drive in UEFI mode to install OS on UEFI", etc. This made me believe that I have to convert my USB drive to GPT just to install an OS on an UEFI machine. <…> Why does the installer say it's impossible to install a UEFI-booted OS from a MBR-based USB drive? Can't it create ...


4

These are in fact 2 questions in one, so here are my answers: UEFI offers more flexibility in boot and device management in a system, it allows the use of GPT disks that remove the limit of 4 primary hard drive partitions, allows the choice of operating system to be booted from the firmware, enables the use of signed bootloaders to improve protection ...


4

This sounds like a boot order issue, each time the hard drive is swapped the boot order will have to be changed in bios. UEFI entries in bios are separate from Legacy hard disks in the bios boot order. Each time you disconnect the UEFI disk and replace it with the legacy disk its entry will be deleted from the boot order. After installing the UEFI disk you ...


3

Your system has a UEFI firmware. Because of this, Windows requires you to format your hard drive as a GPT disk instead of an MBR disk (which you have). GPT disks do not have the concept of an "Active" partition the way MBR disks do. That's why the option is grayed out. In a BIOS world with MBR disks, the computer simply boots to whatever partition has the ...


3

Beep codes are a per-manufacturer decision and system. There is nothing about UEFI specifically which prevents or does not support beep codes.


3

UEFI is perfectly capable of booting BIOS-bootable operating systems, using the so called “Compatibility Support Module” (CSM), which emulates all the necessary stuff. And no, you cannot simply flash whatever you like. The firmware/BIOS is created specifically for your device. Unless the manufacturer provides a legacy BIOS firmware (he won’t), you’re stuck ...


3

That sounds like your CMOS battery is dead. This problem should be completely resolved simply by replacing the cmos battery. I think this because of the messages you get on startup. The behavior is weird, but then again, I've seen dead CMOS batteries do the strangest things (like preventing a computer from shutting down)


3

First, note that malware affects the OS, not the BIOS itself (because there is no value in controlling a BIOS). if someone is attempting to attack the BIOS, their real goal is to attack the OS that that BIOS will boot. Rootkits and other boot time exploits are designed to attack the OS by affecting how it gets booted. Traditionally BIOS and firmware code ...


2

You should be able to install Windows 8 or 8.1 with a UEFI-bootable pendrive: Format it to FAT32. Copy all files from a Windows ISO to the pendrive. This will make the pendrive bootable for UEFI. Then you can choose to reboot from pendrive. (this option is visible on the last photo) (I'm putting it here as a real answer, previously suggested in ...


2

After 1 year I came across the same problem again. Luckily this time I found a solution. In order to add an OsLoader in windows Boot-Manager which loads non-Windows UEFI images you need to manually edit BCD registry. In RegEdit there is a key named "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\BCD00000000" - which is loaded from Windows EFI System-Partition and editing it's subkeys ...


2

You can't have custom images for a bios boot screen.... The most you can do is enable the boot logo or disable it but customizing would never work. Also most mediums of storage wouldn't be available to the bios before post so no way to even store an image for this..


2

What is EFI buying us exactly ? Probably the most obvious and necessary benefit is that EFI understands GPT which is needed for storage devices over 2TB (MBR cannot reach anything beyond the 2TB barrier). UEFI can actually directly load and run an operating system, like other bootloaders (such as U-Boot), instead of just loading the first LBA of a ...


2

Yes, an USB drive with no MBR can boot in UEFI mode: In addition to the standard PC disk partition scheme, which uses a master boot record (MBR), UEFI works with a new partitioning scheme: GUID Partition Table (GPT). GPT is free from many of the limitations of MBR.


2

Yes. It’s also not about GPT or MBR partitioning schemes. It just needs to be FAT32 (could work with other filesystems too, depending on what the actual UEFI implementation supports) and have the bootx64.efi file at the right location.


2

From Wikipedia: The Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) (pronounced as an initialism U-E-F-I or like "unify" without the n)* *Various pronunciations have existed for UEFI; according to the UK PC Pro Magazine, the following pronunciations are in use: "weffy" (PC Pro), "U-E-F-I" (Microsoft), "you-fee", and "you-ef-fee". It is also mentioned ...


2

The problem is that you have booted from disc in non-UEFI mode. Make sure that CSM is disabled in your BIOS settings and when choosing the boot device, it should have UEFI: listed before the DVD drive name. Another thing I would recommend is to make a bootable USB without MBR by using Rufus or the manual method from here. If you can boot from it, then sure ...


2

Found the solution! The culprit was the Intel Graphics driver! I've updated it to the latest version several weeks ago. Uninstalling the driver solved the problem right away (even without a reboot)! I've then installed the old gfx driver offered by Windows Update and the problem remains still solved. 799 MHz at idle with balanced profile!!


2

After my initial bootrec.exe attempt didn't detect any Windows installation, I dug further into Microsoft's documentation. I booted into RE again and went to the command line to load diskpart: > diskpart Selected the disk: DISKPART> list disk DISKPART> select disk 0 Selected the partition called "SYSTEM_DRV" (FAT32 filesystem) and assigned it ...


2

But I still don't understand why I have this GPT issue. Very simple. If you are booting the Windows installation media in legacy BIOS (CSM) mode then it will throw this error and will ask you to re-partition the HDD to MBR scheme. You must install Windows in UEFI mode. You'll need Windows 7 x64 and you must boot from the installation media in UEFI ...


2

CSM or Compatibility Support Module is something that allows booting in legacy BIOS mode on UEFI systems. From Wikipedia: The Compatibility Support Module (CSM) is a component of the UEFI firmware that provides legacy BIOS compatibility by emulating a BIOS environment, allowing legacy operating systems and some option ROMs that do not support UEFI ...


2

I have read that in order to boot Linux with the 32-bit UEFI, you can swap out the standard 64-bit UEFI GRUB with the 32-bit one from a different distribution and it'll be able to work on the Stream 7, so maybe a similar procedure (swapping the 64-bit UEFI bootmgr with the 32-bit one and reconfiguring the entries to match your installation) might work to get ...


2

Another idea : Sometimes the problem is with the power supply. There are two cases : The secondary hard disk is connected to a power cable which is shared with another device. If the other device draws a varying amount of current, it might not let the disk start up fast enough to be counted as up and running by Windows. The allowed startup times vary ...


2

Insufficient power on startup. Possible as ODD usually requires more power to work, but less or same while spinning up as HDD. But make sure - what is the nominal power consumption for the hdd in the caddy? Usual are 0.5 A/1.0 peak for hdd. Try disabling all devices - wifi for example. LAN, especially if configured wit network boot (PXE).. I would rule this ...



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