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10

Solved :) The cause seems to be a strange feature in the UEFI implementation, which can also be seen in the Open Source TianoCore implementation: https://github.com/tianocore/edk2/blob/master/IntelFrameworkModulePkg/Library/GenericBdsLib/BdsMisc.c#L1425 I ultimately found it after diffing my EFI variable dumps after the last 21MB "loss" and finding ...


6

No, your MBR is not working, but that's fine, because your Windows never used it in the first place. Your computer has the new UEFI firmware instead of BIOS, and it does not look for boot code in the MBR anymore – instead, it looks for the bootloader file in an "EFI system partition", and the firmware keeps a list of installed operating systems with ...


6

Here is what i did with help from nix-dev mailing list. Initial setup MacBook 5,1 (2008) with Mac OS 10.9 and hard drive partitioned as follows: a) 200MB EFI System Partition labelled "EFI". b) Two partitions used by Mac OS (10.9). c) Two empty ext4 partitions labelled "nixos" and "home", and a Linux Swap partition labelled "swap". Here is my ...


6

Power-on Self Test or POST is part of the part of the preboot sequence. It tests for common hardware faults. Generally the results of the POST are indicated by audible beeps. Some more advanced hardware, such as motherboards marketed to overclockers, may have a digital readout that displays a code.


5

The major advantages that UEFI provides are: 1. Better disk support: UEFI supports GPT (GUID Partitioned Table), which adds support for very large hard drives (e.g. those in excess of 2TB.). BIOS uses MBR, which had a size limitation of 2TB because of 32bit tables. UEFI has 64bit tables allowing the boot devices to be larger than 2TB. This has a lot of ...


5

The manual exists on Asus' support site and it contains the beep codes on page 2-16 ("Chapter 2: Getting Started"):


4

These are in fact 2 questions in one, so here are my answers: UEFI offers more flexibility in boot and device management in a system, it allows the use of GPT disks that remove the limit of 4 primary hard drive partitions, allows the choice of operating system to be booted from the firmware, enables the use of signed bootloaders to improve protection ...


4

It's possible, and it's very frequently done with both external USB sticks and internal drives. Regarding partition table types: BIOS normally doesn't need any partition table. It is only interested in the bootstrap code part that is the first 440 bytes of your MBR. (Although there are exceptions. Some BIOS implementations actually do break if they cannot ...


4

Google searches turned up tips like "you have to boot the DVD drive in UEFI mode to install OS on UEFI", etc. This made me believe that I have to convert my USB drive to GPT just to install an OS on an UEFI machine. <…> Why does the installer say it's impossible to install a UEFI-booted OS from a MBR-based USB drive? Can't it create ...


3

Assuming you don't have an EFI firmware, I see a number of options: Ditch the computer and buy another one. Return your new disk (or use it somewhere else) and buy a 2TB model instead. If the computer supports two disks, use a sub-2TB disk for the Windows boot disk and use the 3TB disk (with GPT) for data. Note that you can probably get a kit to put a disk ...


3

That sounds like your CMOS battery is dead. This problem should be completely resolved simply by replacing the cmos battery. I think this because of the messages you get on startup. The behavior is weird, but then again, I've seen dead CMOS batteries do the strangest things (like preventing a computer from shutting down)


3

I wonder, is the windows image efi bootable? If the image is not efi bootable you can only boot it using legacy. This goes at least for USBs, and I would assume it does the same with CDs. You can check this by seeing if the file 'BOOTX64.EFI' via the path \EFI\BOOT\ is available on the CD. Also, is it a must for you to install it with this CD? If not, you ...


3

I managed to boot Windows 8.1 on a GPT disk under a BIOS setup WITHOUT a second MBR disk. The story was: My laptop was under a BIOS + GPT setup, with only Arch Linux installed. Recently I need to accomplish some tasks in Windows (which virtual machines cannot) so I am struggling to install Windows under my existing BIOS + GPT setup. According to Milind's ...


3

This problem is resolved in my 10 years old HP desktop (4 cores), with drive: 3TB Western Digital Green, but it should be the same with Seagate too. I added the solution to this blog: Post Anything Here. In a nutshell you need 2 things to do: to install the Intel RAID driver (free). to use a good tool for extending the partition to the maximum size, ...


3

UEFI is perfectly capable of booting BIOS-bootable operating systems, using the so called “Compatibility Support Module” (CSM), which emulates all the necessary stuff. And no, you cannot simply flash whatever you like. The firmware/BIOS is created specifically for your device. Unless the manufacturer provides a legacy BIOS firmware (he won’t), you’re stuck ...


3

Your system has a UEFI firmware. Because of this, Windows requires you to format your hard drive as a GPT disk instead of an MBR disk (which you have). GPT disks do not have the concept of an "Active" partition the way MBR disks do. That's why the option is grayed out. In a BIOS world with MBR disks, the computer simply boots to whatever partition has the ...


2

After my initial bootrec.exe attempt didn't detect any Windows installation, I dug further into Microsoft's documentation. I booted into RE again and went to the command line to load diskpart: > diskpart Selected the disk: DISKPART> list disk DISKPART> select disk 0 Selected the partition called "SYSTEM_DRV" (FAT32 filesystem) and assigned it ...


2

Big thanks to wzyboy. I faced with this problem when tried to install Windows 2012 to Dell PowerEdge 2950 with 6Tb RAID. It hasn't UEFI. I carried out some experiments. First I created 32Mb virtual HDD, as wzyboy said, and simply copied all stuff from Microsoft reserved partition. Windows was started normally. But with this solution, Hyper-V service unable ...


2

The native Self Encrypting Drive function is always on. This means that the data on the ssd is always encrypted, however by default it has no password set. It has an internal hash which is accessed using the BIOS password you give when booting up. The motherboard needs to have HDD BIOS lock option for you to enter the password, which most older desktop ...


2

Gigabyte has also done it, for example http://www.gigabyte.co.nl/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3853#bios


2

The latest version of Rufus allows seamless UEFI boot from an NTFS partition. If you select a Windows installation ISO, set the partition scheme to GPT partition scheme for UEFI computers and also set the file system to NTFS, Rufus will add everything required to allow booting NTFS partition from an UEFI system. Outside of using Windows installation media, ...


2

After 1 year I came across the same problem again. Luckily this time I found a solution. In order to add an OsLoader in windows Boot-Manager which loads non-Windows UEFI images you need to manually edit BCD registry. In RegEdit there is a key named "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\BCD00000000" - which is loaded from Windows EFI System-Partition and editing it's subkeys ...


2

When booting the Windows 7 installation DVD you get the message : "Windows cannot be installed to this disk. The selected disk is of the GPT partition style." So the disk is already GPT (why if it's only 1TB?). However, installing Windows 7 64-bit on GPT can only be done in UEFI mode. Conclusion: Either your Windows 7 DVD isn't 64-bit or your BIOS doesn't ...


2

You need to split the 350MB MBR boot partition into the System and Reserved partitions used by the Windows GPT boot system. Based on instructions I wrote last time I did this process: Load a command prompt from the DVD (Repair Your Computer -> Troubleshoot -> Advanced options -> Command prompt) diskpart select disk 0 list partition # To verify layout ...


2

You can install Windows on it with your non-UEFI computer, but it will only let you use the first 2 TiB (slightly more than a "2 TB" disk). Windows will not let you create partitions that extend into, or start in, the region beyond the 2 TiB point. So in your example you would not be able to create your third partition (1.5 TB). ( The reason is that MBR ...


2

I have read that in order to boot Linux with the 32-bit UEFI, you can swap out the standard 64-bit UEFI GRUB with the 32-bit one from a different distribution and it'll be able to work on the Stream 7, so maybe a similar procedure (swapping the 64-bit UEFI bootmgr with the 32-bit one and reconfiguring the entries to match your installation) might work to get ...


2

Another idea : Sometimes the problem is with the power supply. There are two cases : The secondary hard disk is connected to a power cable which is shared with another device. If the other device draws a varying amount of current, it might not let the disk start up fast enough to be counted as up and running by Windows. The allowed startup times vary ...


2

Insufficient power on startup. Possible as ODD usually requires more power to work, but less or same while spinning up as HDD. But make sure - what is the nominal power consumption for the hdd in the caddy? Usual are 0.5 A/1.0 peak for hdd. Try disabling all devices - wifi for example. LAN, especially if configured wit network boot (PXE).. I would rule this ...


2

The problem is that you have booted from disc in non-UEFI mode. Make sure that CSM is disabled in your BIOS settings and when choosing the boot device, it should have UEFI: listed before the DVD drive name. Another thing I would recommend is to make a bootable USB without MBR by using Rufus or the manual method from here. If you can boot from it, then sure ...


2

Found the solution! The culprit was the Intel Graphics driver! I've updated it to the latest version several weeks ago. Uninstalling the driver solved the problem right away (even without a reboot)! I've then installed the old gfx driver offered by Windows Update and the problem remains still solved. 799 MHz at idle with balanced profile!!



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