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This sounds like a boot order issue, each time the hard drive is swapped the boot order will have to be changed in bios. UEFI entries in bios are separate from Legacy hard disks in the bios boot order. Each time you disconnect the UEFI disk and replace it with the legacy disk its entry will be deleted from the boot order. After installing the UEFI disk you ...


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The latest Rufus Version includes a free NTFS driver for EFI to use NTFS instead of FAt32 to avoid the 4GB file size limitation when creating a bootable USB thumb drive. Version 2.0 (2015.03.03) Add seamless UEFI boot of NTFS partitions, for Windows ISOs with large files (>4GB)


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Few years ago I used HP USB Disk Storage Format Tool and unetbootin to do this. Check it out, should work.


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Good on ya for being informed on UEFI. What version of Windows are you using? Win8 correct? ~ Do you get a GRUB bootloader, at least, on the second new drive? If yes, you may just need a simple, default, Win startup repair to reevaluate the Windows boot sectors (beginning and ending) after a Linux installation. Additionally, "Linux" doesn't always play ...


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I had the same problem. Eventually I tracked it down to the firmware overwriting the CRC entries in the backup GPT header every boot to some invalid value. Change the disk mode in the firmware setup from RAID to AHCI stopped it from doing this (and I wasn't using RAID anyway).


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Check for VeraCrypt, seems that they will continue development of TrueCrypt. Note1: What i see is that they took the source code of TrueCrypt and continue from there. Note2: I do not know if VeraCrypt supports UEFI (GPT discs)


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For Arch, you should be able to install in EFI/UEFI mode and boot in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode. Unlike distributions with more automated installation procedures, Arch's installation instructions specify manual selection and installation of the boot manager. Because BIOS-mode booting relies (almost) exclusively on disk-based data, it's possible to fully set up a ...


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Depending on the model of your motherboard (please state your model) you should be able to go into the bios and with your usb device attached, set it as a boot device. There may be additional UEFI features you need to disable, but without your model it's hard to know.


1

What you want to do is possible; I've seen posts from people who've done it. I've not done it myself, though. As grawity says, your error message is a result of your first installation being in EFI/UEFI mode and your (accidentally/mistakenly) booting the second installation in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode. You must learn the procedure to force your system to boot ...


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As far as I understand, I can install one Windows system on each drive, because Windows need to create an EFI boot partition (and an MSR, whatever that is). A second installation will refuse to install if there is already an EFI boot partition. That shouldn't be the reason. It is quite normal to share a single EFI system partition across several ...


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Windows 7 DOES support GPT boot. It is possible if you use both 64bit. But the fast boot will cause the disk be (softwarelly) dirty and make windows 7 do chkdsk. You need to disable it. You're likely getting the message due to you are using 32bit.


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You can install and boot Windows 8 32bit UEFI, but it's not that simple. It involves using command prompt and a Windows PE 32 bit UEFI boot disk (if available) along with a 32 bit Windows WIM file. The most easy way is to remove the hard disk (or ssd) and get a USB adapter for it and use another workstation to deploy the image. If this option is not ...


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This sounds like an Instant Go device where the BIOS is device encrypted. Unfortunately we cannot verify that and decrypt the device since you wiped the disk. I suggest you get Windows 8.1 back on the device because a) that is your only chance and b) Windows 7 would be slower than W 8.1 anyhow.


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Did you know that the Arch wiki has a beginner's guide which is easier to follow for users unfamiliar with the Arch installation process ? The installation is pretty straightforward so I won't document it here completely, I'll just highlight the UEFI-related parts : first you need to use a GPT partition table. I prefer to use gdisk (the GPT equivalent of ...


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First, the commands: parted /dev/sda mklabel gpt mkpart ESP fat32 1MiB 513MiB set 1 boot on mkpart primary ext4 513MiB 100% quit mkfs.vfat -F32 /dev/sda1 mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda2 mount /dev/sda2 /mnt mkdir -p /mnt/boot mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot pacstrap -i /mnt base base-devel genfstab -U -p /mnt >> /mnt/etc/fstab check fstab with 'nano /mnt/etc/fstab' ...


2

The UEFI Shell is a regular .efi program, which you can download. Store it at \SHELLX64.EFI or a similar path on the EFI filesystem, and add it to the UEFI boot manager the usual way.


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If you are using the Windows USB/DVD download tool, you have to manually add EFI support. Search for it on Google or give Rufus a try.


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It's possible, but not certain, that you'll be able to boot the image you copied using my rEFInd boot manager. You can test this without installing anything to your hard disk by downloading the USB flash drive or CD-R image, preparing a boot medium with it, and booting it. If you're lucky, you'll see one or more entries for the Linux kernel(s) and/or the EFI ...


3

Your system has a UEFI firmware. Because of this, Windows requires you to format your hard drive as a GPT disk instead of an MBR disk (which you have). GPT disks do not have the concept of an "Active" partition the way MBR disks do. That's why the option is grayed out. In a BIOS world with MBR disks, the computer simply boots to whatever partition has the ...


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Were you performing an EFI boot of Windows on a Mac? I've just accomplished the same thing on my Mid-2009 MacBook Pro 5,4 My EFI shell is also non-firmware. I had to put it in the EFI partition and bless it manually.. Still I was able to use Set StartupDelay [X] My EFI shell is the Precompiled x86_64 UEFI Shell v1 binary found at ...


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Another approach: Create your USB bios boot key with Windows USB/DVD Download Tool and use the Microsoft Windows 8 ISO Move all the content off the key to a temporary location Format the USB key to FAT32 (use diskmgmt.msc or diskpart for this) Move the files from the temporary location onto the USB key Disable "Legacy BIOS" Boot on the USB key ...


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After my initial bootrec.exe attempt didn't detect any Windows installation, I dug further into Microsoft's documentation. I booted into RE again and went to the command line to load diskpart: > diskpart Selected the disk: DISKPART> list disk DISKPART> select disk 0 Selected the partition called "SYSTEM_DRV" (FAT32 filesystem) and assigned it ...



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