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In the efi partition, there is the efi boot loader in the directory /EFI/boot, and on a x64 system the file bootx64.efi is loaded, on a x86 system the file bootia32.efi is started. No sector addresses or similar are needed, because the EFI understands the file system (FAT32). Windows stores its boot configuration in the directory /Microsoft/Boot/, namely in ...


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In some ASUS firmwares (e.g. "Aptio"), there is no such global choice – all available boot options are merged into a single menu (press Esc to open the boot menu one-time). BIOS-mode boot entries always describe a specific disk rather than a specific OS (since they only boot the MBR 'bootcode' and don't know the OS name, unlike UEFI-mode boot entries which ...


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Do you have a Comodo Time Machine a Deep Freezer or any software who maybe made a snapshot of your pc around that time? The date is stuck around 3 weeks ago, is very unlikely to be a battery malfunction, but always it's worth a try If nothing is working you always can make a .bat file and set it to start on the start up of the PC. https://msdn.microsoft....


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It looks like you have a UEFI based install First, enter your computer's SETUP (typically by pressing delete or F2 while the computer is booting). Within setup you usually have the option to rearrange or remove boot options. Once the boot option for grub has been removed, you can delete Grub's files from the EFI system partition, (you can assign it a drive ...


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For the moment it works with these: w32tm /config /syncfromflags:domhier /update net stop w32time w32tm /unregister w32tm /register net start w32time w32tm /resync The time may be out of sync with the domain controller even if it seems the computer is working properly in the domain.


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New Windows 8 PCs don’t include the traditional BIOS. They use UEFI firmware instead, just as Macs have for years. How you go about doing common system tasks has changed. If you’re interested in why UEFI is replacing the BIOS, take a look at our overview of UEFI and how it’s different from the traditional BIOS. Rather than have modern PCs wait several ...


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UEFI supports Secure Boot (and MBR doesn't). It's immune to MBR viruses, since BIOS is not directly loading the OS, and delegated EFI firmware to do that. GPT disks support up to 128 primary partitions, while MBR supports up to 4 primary partitions or 3 primary and 1 extended partition, split in up to 128 logical partitions . GPT disks have reserved space ...


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I can't see EFI on the screenshot, I am guessing that is just a stock image by the watermark - can you please take a picture of yours? If Windows says legacy mode, I believe you are booting in to a legacy/non EFI based system Another way to test and confirm is to go to Disk Management (Windows Key + x, then k). By default, you should have either a 100MB ...


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(Motherboard) ASUS BIOS beep codes One short beep - VGA detected, No keyboard detected Two short beeps - When using Crashfree to recover BIOS, the new BIOS is successfully recognized. One continuous beep followed by two short beeps then a pause (repeated) - No memory detected One continuous beep followed by three short beeps - No VGA ...


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Looks like Ubuntu assumes RTC is in UTC while Windows assumes RTC is in local time zone. I ended up configuring Windows to treat RTC in UTC as described in Does Windows 10 support UTC as BIOS time?.


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It is actually quite easy to make a UEFI Windows 10 installatzion bootable in BIOS mode as well: First you need to create a hybrid MBR from the GPT (e.g. using gdisk), including the Windows partition (type 7) and making it bootable. Then boot a Windows install CD/USB stick in BIOS mode and use startup repair. This will create a bootblock in the windows ...


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Yes, you're right. BIOS/UEFI is MB's option, so that's the component you're wanting to replace.


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Finally I solved my problem with reinstall fedora 24 with DVD disk(not USB), because always my USB is booted in UEFI mode and I couldn't to change it to lagacy/BIOS mode(for my BIOS). In this case, when DVD is booted, the BIOS let me to choose a mode from UEFI mode and BIOS mode, I chose BIOS mode and installed it.


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I recommend using WinToUSB to create Windows installation USB flash dirve, WinToUSB has released a new feature called "Windows Installation USB Creator" which allows you to create a Windows installation USB falsh drive with a few simple steps, with this feature you can create a Windows installation USB flash drive to install Windows 10/8/7 on both BIOS and ...


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I found the solution: 1)Insert your USB without mounting. Use fdisk -l to find which device is it. Here we assume it's /dev/sdx. Run cgdisk /dev/sdx. Create two partitions: first one with size 100M and hex code EF00 and second one with all defaults (hex code 8300 and size the remaining size of the usb). You should now have 2 partitions /dev/sdx1 and /dev/...


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I found the answer - you need to switch RAID to AHCI for the SATA operation. This way you can boot in UEFI Secure Boot OFF and get the SSD mounted. Check this http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2301071&page=2


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I know you specifically mentioned doing this through UEFI, but it's worth at least mentioning that this can also be done by taking the disk offline in Windows or removing the letter from the partition, since the OP mentioned having it not display in My PC. Both are done by running the Computer Management program, and selecting Disk Management. To remove a ...


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As LawrenceC mentioned, BIOS usually has a disable button for HDDs. On the other hand, if you are looking to hide specific Disk Drives, you can do so through the following. Windows KeyR → regedit → Hit OK. Make a backup through File → Export. Goto HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE → Software → Microsoft → Windows → CurrentVersion → ...


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Most BIOS/UEFI menus have something buried in there to disable/enable individual hard drives or SATA controllers. The OS cannot see this hardware when it's hidden in this way. What this option is called (and whether it exists) varies by manufacturer and BIOS/UEFI vendor, so it's probably best just to carefully look at all the menu options and look for a ...


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Many of the hurdles that you might face when making a Windows installation USB drive are overcome with the right tool. The most versatile one at the moment is Easy2Boot. By following one of the tutorials out there, you can keep your USB drive (even large USB hard drives) formatted as NTFS, rather than limiting your options with FAT32. Even UEFI is ...



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