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In my very limited experience ( I paid 135 for a 919 9.7" from dealsmachine) you can get the boot at least and probaly the BIOS setup as well. Patience leaving it on the charger and then pressing power and volume up at once. Sometimes the BIOS setup required a keyboard and mouse. I think the Windows button is required to enter setup upon boot... You ...


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I have to say it did work once when I was swapping spots with one of my memmories but I cannot reproduce that situation anymore somehow... – Barrosy Jan 20 at 16:03 The fact that it worked once makes me lean towards ram/ram slot issues. I'd be looking for some cheap(read: expendable, since you don't know where exactly the problem is) ...


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I have no definite solution, but I do have some observations and suggestions: Show us details -- Your summary of what you've done at every step omits an awful lot of details. What might be helpful is a summary of those details at one point in time, then stop messing with the system until you collect a few suggestions that you can prioritize. The Linux Boot ...


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It is "fixed" in recent util-linux (as of 2.26-rc1): Kay reported that Windows 8.1 installed does not recognize GPT created by libfdisk, but parted works as expected. It seems (according to the header hexdump) that the problem is HeaderSize GPT field where libfdisk uses 512 (header + reserved area), but parted uses 92. The both is pretty ...


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After comparing behaviour with that with parted that I used previously, it appears the buggy UEFI rejects partition tables with a header length of 512, which the standard permits: Size in bytes of the GPT Header. The HeaderSize must be greater than or equal to 92 and must be less than or equal to the logical block size. After modifying util-linux ...


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You might be in Setup Mode because you have deleted the Platform Key in your BIOS. Enabling Secure Boot in this state enables your OS to write a new Platform Key (possibly useful for securing a Linux installation). But if you don't do that, you remain in Setup Mode and the Secure Boot State, indicating the Platform Key has been used to secure the system, ...


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Didn't find why the Windows 10 boot loader would not allow me to run from a live USB, but, as per the comments of @TECHIE007, I decided to simply work around it. The solution was to disable Windows bypassing the BIOS screen, (power options -> change what the power buttons do -> change administrator settings -> disable fast startup) and just go through my own ...


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In the end I did manage to solve it, although it's still unclear to me why this works. Instead of using fdisk to create the partitions I used parted. In addition, I did a reboot after every step in the deployment. Like this: Boot Clonezilla into shell and create partitions using parted, making sure they're properly aligned. Reboot Boot Clonezilla into ...


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The terminology is often overlooked (which it shouldn't really be by now, but there we go.) Often the UEFI is referred to as the BIOS, when really it should be called the UEFI or at least the system firmware. According to this source, your machine has a UEFI firmware: HP Commercial Notebook PCs - Basic Input Output System (BIOS) Updates (EDK2 UEFI ...


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EFIs support programs, including boot loaders, of like bit depth. In other words, an x86-64 (aka AMD64, x64, or EM64T) EFI can launch a 64-bit binary, which normally has a filename ending in x64.efi; and an x86 (aka IA32, i686 or related) EFI can launch a 32-bit binary, which normally has a filename ending in ia32.efi. Note that, if you have a 32-bit EFI, ...


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I don't know of a way to prevent Windows from writing to the NVRAM and modifying EFI variables; however, there are other things you could do.... See my answer to this question for some tools that might help. bcdedit is most likely to be useful in this respect. You could also try EasyUEFI, which I'd not used when I wrote that earlier response. Another ...


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On my Dell XPS 13 L322X, I actually had to use the USB port on the right side. It would never find a bootable disk using the USB port on the left side. I tried this with different USB2/3 sticks for BIOS and/or UEFI formatted with Rufus.


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To elaborate on grawity's answer, there are several issues, of varying degrees of relevance, to your question: UGA vs. GOP -- As you say, there are two EFI video systems, UGA and GOP. The latter was introduced with EFI 2.x (aka UEFI), IIRC, and AFAIK all UEFI-based systems use GOP. In principle, all EFI 1.x systems should use UGA; however, Apple (which ...


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The way i was able to fix it was taking apart my laptop ( a series 5) removing the CMOS battery (its a little black circle connected by a red and black wire located above the ram slot to the right) and waiting a minute and putting it all back together. This reset by UEIF to defaults and booted me back up into windows.


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After few days of waiting I have got an answer from AsRock tech support Due to limitation of Windows 7 MBR, its limited to 2 TB (refers to Microsoft). UEFI mode installation could works with 2 TB or larger . (Windows 8.1 /10 comes with UEFI mode). To set up RAID, please try below. Delete the RAID in the BIOS (if applied). Load the ...


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My suspicion is that your problem is not related to Secure Boot. Ubuntu, which you say you installed, supports Secure Boot. So do Fedora, OpenSUSE, ALT, and several others. That said, there are known problems, mostly with flaky EFIs; but these problems would normally prevent the installation medium from booting, so you wouldn't have gotten as far as you have ...


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With the exception of a few computers that implement EFI as a feature that's run from a BIOS (such as Gigabyte's abysmal "Hybrid EFI"), computers that support EFI-mode booting use EFI, not BIOS. Thus, there is no such thing as "switching off the EFI." What many computers do permit is booting BIOS-mode OSes via a feature called the Compatibility Support ...


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The motherboard manufacturer will have implemented either BIOS or UEFI, it is stored in a ROM chip on the motherboard and not tied to the chipset or CPU. There are no boards that I know of that have a choice, it will have one or the other, and there is no 'opt-out' method. This firmware controls all of your low level devices. BIOS is now outdated and being ...


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Yes, you can't have your cake and eat it. You either install win10 in bios mode or UEFI mode, after which you can't switch, since bios mode uses MBR (old) and UEFI mode uses GPT (EFI partition). as the posters say, best (and more modern) bet is to set bios to UEFI and reinstall from scratch Pingers.



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