Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

59

There is no general "undo" for every operation in terminal. If you wish to recover a file after using rm you will need to look into recovery software. An option to prevent you from future mistakes is to make a second alias for rm like so and add it to your ~/.bashrc: alias rmi='rm -i' that way you will be prompted for confirmation of future deletes. ...


20

On ubuntu or similar: $ sudo apt-get install trash-cli $ alias rm=trash Then put that alias in .bashrc or the appropriate login script for your shell of choice. The trash-cli package is a command-line interface to the same trash can that GNOME and KDE and other use. So anything you delete via the trash command can be restored by GNOME/KDE and vice-versa. ...


20

Short Answer To undo a file/folder operation in Windows, you can use either the Undo command in the Edit menu, or press Ctrl+Z. Caveat NB: There are a few things to note however. While the undo command usually undoes the last file operation, it will not always be the operation you are expecting. Sometimes the last operation does not make it into the undo ...


14

tar tf archive.tar will list the contents line by line. This can be piped to xargs directly, but beware: do the deletion very carefully. You don't want to just rm -r everything that tar tf tells you, since it might include directories that were not empty before unpacking! You could do tar tf archive.tar | xargs -d'\n' rm -v tar tf archive.tar | sort -r ...


11

This issue was discussed and answered on Microsoft Office for Developers Forums on April 14, 2011. Question posted by Vershner: I originally posted this in the IT Professionals forum but they told me to post it here because the issue was by design. When I click undo in the quick access toolbar it undoes the last action in Excel, not the ...


10

The traditional answer is: You recover the file from the latest backup. You do have a recent backup, don't you? because on many unix filesystems this simple isn't possible, or is very difficult. As others have noted this is not the end-all and be-all of the issue any more, but not making mistakes of this kind is still the preferred approach.


9

The way 'around' it is to open multiple copies of Excel, one per worksheet. This is really annoying, but there is no other way. I have special shortcuts for my main spreadsheets, just to open them explicitly. To do this: Make a NEW shortcut - right-click on your desktop, New, Short cut. Browse to the excel program ( "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft ...


9

List the contents of the tar file like so: tar tzf myarchive.tar Then, delete those file names by iterating over that list: while IFS= read -r file; do echo "$file"; done < <(tar tzf myarchive.tar.gz) This will still just list the files that would be deleted. Replace echo with rm if you're really sure these are the ones you want to remove. And ...


7

I am not sure exactly what you want but the key combination in Chrome to undo recently closed tab is: Ctrl+Shift+T If you right-click on the tab bar's background, you will see a context menu that gives this key combination as a hint:


7

Edit > Undo Move or Ctrl+Z. You may have to press Alt first, if the menu bar is not visible.


7

Ctrlo goes back in jump list Ctrli goes forward in jump list additionally i would consider to set a mark via m' and when done with scrolling press ''.


7

There is no recycle bin for the command line. You could try some of the various undelete utilities, but there's no guarantee that they would work.


6

:set undoreload=0 | edit should do what you're asking for.


6

On XP at least you can see the list of actions that undo will make by hovering over Edit/Undo. Starting with two files named 1.txt and 2.txt I delete them both, hovering over the "Undo Delete" then displays the following text in the status bar: Undo Delete '1.txt' and '2.txt' I don't know if ths option is available in Vista and/or 7 but I assure you ...


6

If you want separate undo/redo lists, open separate instances of Excel. If you simply open multiple files by double-clicking, they're opened in the same Excel process and share the same undo/redo list. If you manually open multiple instances of Excel and then open your files in those instances, they don't share the undo/redo list. For further details, you ...


5

I would just uninstall the add on and reinstall the older version. I think it would be a little buggy to try to "roll back" to the previous version if it is even possible. UPDATE: I found that on this link https://adblockplus.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=6262 people were also having the same problem and someone sent an update at 11:18 EST. Try ...


5

Probably: :let old_ul=&ul :set ul=-1 :let &ul=old_ul :unlet old_ul ('ul' is alias for 'undolevels').


5

Benoit's function didn't work for me, but I found something similar in the vim manual, here: http://www.polarhome.com/vim/manual/v73/undo.html#undo-remarks I slapped it into a function, added to my vimrc and it seems to be working fine on vim 7.3: " A function to clear the undo history function! <SID>ForgetUndo() let old_undolevels = ...


5

The old :edit! behaviour in a one-liner: :exe "set ul=-1 | e! | set ul=" . &ul


5

Negative. There is no magic undo button in linux.


5

No, there is no such built-in operation as undo for the command line. However, you can browse the past commands with up & down arrows and if the command is non-destructive (copy, move, rename, ...) you can reverse the effect of it manually (by removing the copied file, moving the file back to original location or swapping the file parameters with ...


5

I use photoshop 7 but should be similar in any later versions. Edit>Preferences>General Redoc Key - by default is Ctrl+Z (Toggles Undo/Redo) Change it to Ctrl+Shift+z or something, and change the history states to a nice high value (I have 200). Press Ok and jobs a good-un!


4

You probably do not want to change this. Photoshop has a "Step backward" function that can be accessed by SHIFT+CTRL+Z. Also, you can step forward again by using ALT+CTRL+Z.


4

You could use trash-cli if you use KDE when you run a gui. This is command line utility to delete/restore using the KDE trash facilities.


4

No. Unix doesn't natively provide an undo feature. The philosophy is that if it's gone, it's gone. If it was important, it should have been backed up. Instead of removing a file, you can move it to a temporary “trash” directory. Some desktop environments make their “delete” command move the file to the trash. But beware that only a few applications will ...


4

I think you can have Autohotkey override an existing shortcut. ^z:: return Will make Ctrl + z do nothing Edit: This will apply everywhere. To apply in explorer only, try this: #IfWinActive ahk_class ExploreWClass ^z:: #IfWinActive ahk_class CabinetWClass ^z:: return #IfWinActive


4

You can turn on persistent undo, check the help with :help undo-persistence At least vim 7.3 is required. undo-persistence needs some setup before use, like defining a directory to keep the persistent undo information. A good explanation is given here: http://amix.dk/blog/post/19548 (thanks to @Dalker)


4

What you can do is re-do the three hours of work, and then think about aliasing your rm command to a script which works like rm but stages deletes through a trash bin directory which must be explicitly emptied before the files are really gone.


4

Ctrl+Z will undo the drag and drop operation. Choosing Undo from the Edit menu works as well.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible