Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

49

They're BLUE! I believe USB-3 ports should be colored differently (blue) The use of blue pantone thermoplastics in USB 3.0 connectors is recommended on systems with a mix of USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 ports. For certification, the USB-IF does require that the user be able to clearly and easily distinguish between a USB 3.0 and a USB 2.0 port on a system; ...


40

Easy: USB 1.1 = 12 Mbit/s Firefire 400 = 400 Mbit/s USB 2.0 = 480 Mbit/s FireWire 800 = 800 Mbit/s USB 3.0 = 5 Gbit/s eSATA = Up to 6 Gbit/s right now as it depend on the internal SATA chip. For the speed/throughput/bandwidth of more devices have look at this article on wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_device_bit_rates#Peripheral There ...


27

Just to clear up some possible misconceptions about USB. First there are four speeds. There is low speed of 1.5 Mb/s (USB 1.0), full speed of 12 Mb/s (USB 1.0), Hi-Speed of 480 Mb/s (USB 2.0) and SuperSpeed of 5.0 Gb/s (USB 3.0). People tend to confuse speeds and versions of USB standard. Usually devices are made to the newest standard even if they don't ...


23

A yellow USB port usually denotes an "always on" port. It supplies power to the device plugged into it even when the laptop is off.


22

USB 3 is a different technology that uses slightly different connectors and – most importantly – is not upwards compatible in the sense of "just install a new driver and it works". To accommodate the additional pins for SuperSpeed mode, the physical form factors for USB 3.0 plugs and receptacles have been modified. That means you can run ...


15

In device manager look for Extensible Host Controller Interface (xHCI) In Universal Serial Bus Controllers. If you have a usb 3.0 you'll have it, if not, not. Here is an example of an Intel USB controller in device manager


15

You need USB 3.0 drivers to read installation media. Windows 7 is fine with AHCI.


14

Yes, a USB 3.0 external drive will work on a USB 2.0 port. Very broadly, if the path from your drive to the system USB port has one non USB 3.0 component, the interface will fall back to USB 2.0. USB 3.0 Drive ==> USB 3.0 cable ==> USB 3.0 Port on Device It's backwards compatible. Your existing USB 2.0 gear will work on version 3.0 ports and ...


13

Short answer: No. Long answer: I stumbled across part of the answer to my question in a comment to an answer for a seemingly unrelated question. It turns out USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 are physically segregated in the wiring. But as Ben Voigt points out, the segregation is also done at the port level within each bus: ...each downstream port negotiates its own ...


13

On my HP laptop, USB 3.0 ports logo/symbol have an "SS" (for Super Speed). USB 2.0 ports only have the typical USB symbol with no "SS". See the following image: http://www.usr.com/education/periphimg/USB-connectors-edu.png


13

According to the USB3 specification from here, USB2 functionality on USB3 hosts/hubs does not change. Therefore, (putting power issues aside) USB2 devices still operate with a broadcast method, meaning it will share the same old USB speed bandwidth with all other USB2 devices on the same host/hub. USB2 devices will not have USB3 capacity available to it, as ...


12

USB3 requires new connectors, with more connections in them. These are backwards compatible, Therefore a USB1/USB2 device will plug into a USB3 host, but this means that unless your case has the new connectors, you can't in a USB3 device. You could still use these connectors for USB1/USB2 devices, or use USB3 devices in a USB1/2 compatibility mode.


12

According the tech specs Left side: two USB 3.0 ports, external monitor (VGA DB-15, HDMI), ethernet (RJ-45) Right side: one USB 2.0 port and one eSATA/USB combo port


12

Try this, ymmv. Install from USB: When Windows is asking for driver, just click Cancel. You will be brought back to the welcome screen. At the welcome screen, remove your USB drive, insert it back to DIFFERENT USB PORT. Click Install Now again. The installation process will be like usual. Also, forget where I found this tidbit "it was the ...


11

The problem is a bit mysterious until you realize what's happening behind the scenes during a windows install. And, there is a workaround to allow you to use USB 3.0. One workaround is easier in the moment, the other requires a bit of work to setup, but will be easiest for future installs. Introduction: What exactly is the problem Here is a lengthy but ...


11

There are two ways to get USB 3.0 on an old PC without having to reach around the back side every time. One option is to get a PCI-E USB 3.0 card, and then run a USB 3.0 extension cable or hub up to the front of your computer. This will probably be the easier option to set up, but maybe not as convenient to use. There are a lot of these available from ...


11

Visually speaking, USB 3 ports are typically blue, so you can easily differentiate them. They also have 2 extra pins. It is impossible to differntiate versions 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0 from each other visually. However, a computer would have to be pretty old to have version 1 or 1.1 ports. I believe anything on a Pentium 4 or later would be v2 and up. See the ...


11

When using a USB 2.0 device on a USB 3.0 bus, the USB 2.0 speed will be used, so not much will be gained by just replacing the controller.


9

Another way to check whether you are using a USB 3.0 connection or not is to use USBView.exe from Windows Driver Kit (WDK) You could also use USB Device Tree Viewer, which is very similar to USBView.exe and you won't have to download the huge WDK to use it. When you run USB Device Tree Viewer, you'll see a list of USB Host Controllers (there are 3 on my ...


8

USB 3.0 is fully cross compatible. USB 3.0 devices will run at 2.0 speed when hooked into a USB 2.0 port. USB 2.0 devices will run at 2.0 speed when hooked into a USB 3.0 port. The USB A connectors for 3.0 have a second set of contacts that will not touch anything when plugged into a mating 2.0 termination. USB A connectors are typically used on the ...


8

We've also been looking for these for a long time, but no one made a USB 3.0 until just this year. We ended up buying some adapters from this place http://www.usb3gigabit.com/. But we needed them for a different purpose - we don't do virtualization but needed to add second full gigabit port to the laptops we send out to be used as network diagnostics ...


7

I realize that your question goes to Lenovo laptop, but for completeness I'd like to mention that on Dell T3600 the ports labeled with SS and a USB icon are USB 3.0 ports. Ports with just the USB icon are USB 2.0 ports.


7

Short answer: No. Slightly longer answer: Yes, but you'll essentially need another computer in a box to do it. USB (1.1, 2.0, and 3.0) are based on completely different specs than Firewire (400 and 800). Even the way they interact with the processor and memory is completely different. They are not wire-compatible, or even signal-compatible. In order to ...


7

OK, on short you must change the USB port. I nearly thought I wrecked a friends LAPTOP. My problem was like this: ASUS laptop no physical DVD drive WIN7 was asking for CD/DVD driver As soon as I changed the USB port from 3.0 to another one (which I suppose was a 2.0 drive) it worked.


6

The short answer is there's no way, from an end-user POV, to conclusively test because you'd need visibility to the internal bus to measure the effective transfer rate. The suggestion to measure the actual throughput as seen from your terminal devices is the next best alternative. However, you should check to see that your laptop (Windows device) actually ...


6

USB3 operates at higher speeds than SATA can handle, so optimally you should notice no difference between USB3 and an internal drive of the same type. In my experience with my own drive, I've noticed this to be true. As for exact speeds, SATA 2 operates at 3 Gb/s optimally, which gives a maximum bandwidth of ~384MB/s. SATA 1 operates at 1.5 Gb/s I believe. ...


6

Wikipedia gives a quite comprehensive comparison: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA#Comparison_with_other_buses


6

Yes, USB 3.0 is backwards compatible. However, some new instructions are added to the new 3.0 standard so some functionality might not work. However, most hardware will support USB 2.0 and I won't expect too much problems with an external hard drive. Reference from PCWorld: The beauty of USB 3.0 is its backward compatibility with USB 2.0; you need a ...


6

As the comments said, USB 3 drivers are not something that Windows supports natively. Your main question came about the speed - there will be no difference unless your USB memory stick is USB 3 compatible. This gets quite advanced, I am assuming you have a working knowledge of the command prompt. I would recommend you add the various Microsoft directories ...


5

In the thread USB 3.0 bracket Low 2.0 Speeds the problem was electrical interference. I suppose that at USB 3 speeds everything must be perfect. The thread mentions "ferrite core IN the bracket connector", which is unfamiliar to me. Does your cable have a ferrite bead ? (I would maybe try a better-quality cable.) EDIT The blog “This Device Can Perform ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible