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78

The SuperSpeed transfer mode requires a USB 3.0 cable. Any USB cable will make a data connection at a slower rate. Source 1: USB - Wikipedia SuperSpeed is supported only by USB 3.0 and newer interfaces, and requires a connector and cable with extra pins and wires, usually distinguishable by the blue inserts in connectors. Source 2: USB 3.0 ...


66

They're BLUE! I believe USB-3 ports should be colored differently (blue) The use of blue pantone thermoplastics in USB 3.0 connectors is recommended on systems with a mix of USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 ports. For certification, the USB-IF does require that the user be able to clearly and easily distinguish between a USB 3.0 and a USB 2.0 port on a system; ...


60

The theoretical maximums are as follows: In bits per second, that is: USB 1.1 = 12 Mbit/s Firefire 400 = 400 Mbit/s USB 2.0 = 480 Mbit/s FireWire 800 = 800 Mbit/s USB 3.0 = 5 Gbit/s USB 3.1 = 10 Gbit/s eSATA = Up to 6 Gbit/s (750 MB/s) right now as it depend on the internal SATA chip. Thunderbolt = 10 Gbit/s × 2 (2 channels) Thunderbolt 2 = 20 Gbit/s ...


49

A "USB 3.0 connection" requires a USB 3.0 cable. Some USB 3.0 devices can be connected and operated as a USB 2.0 device (at USB 2.0 speeds), using a USB 2.0 cable. However, speed is not the only issue. There are at least three important differences in cable construction between the two standards. Related to speed: The USB 3.0 cable has 9 internal ...


39

Another way to check whether you are using a USB 3.0 connection or not is to use USBView.exe from Windows Driver Kit (WDK) You could also use USB Device Tree Viewer, which is very similar to USBView.exe and you won't have to download the huge WDK to use it. When you run USB Device Tree Viewer, you'll see a list of USB Host Controllers (there are 3 on my ...


32

A yellow USB port usually denotes an "always on" port. It supplies power to the device plugged into it even when the laptop is off.


32

Will I get better speeds from my 5400rpm hard drive when it is inside an enclosure providing USB 3.0 connectivity? That depends what you are comparing it with. Speeds over USB (1 or 2 or 3) will be slower than directly in the laptop since you are adding protocol overhead. Or what will the possible speeds be? Assuming that the drive is fast enough (...


27

Just to clear up some possible misconceptions about USB. First there are four speeds. There is low speed of 1.5 Mb/s (USB 1.0), full speed of 12 Mb/s (USB 1.0), Hi-Speed of 480 Mb/s (USB 2.0) and SuperSpeed of 5.0 Gb/s (USB 3.0). People tend to confuse speeds and versions of USB standard. Usually devices are made to the newest standard even if they don't ...


27

Yes, a USB 3.0 external drive will work on a USB 2.0 port. Very broadly, if the path from your drive to the system USB port has one non USB 3.0 component, the interface will fall back to USB 2.0. USB 3.0 Drive ==> USB 3.0 cable ==> USB 3.0 Port on Device It's backwards compatible. Your existing USB 2.0 gear will work on version 3.0 ports and ...


24

You need USB 3.0 drivers to read installation media. Windows 7 is fine with AHCI.


23

USB 3 is a different technology that uses slightly different connectors and – most importantly – is not upwards compatible in the sense of "just install a new driver and it works". To accommodate the additional pins for SuperSpeed mode, the physical form factors for USB 3.0 plugs and receptacles have been modified. That means you can run ...


23

Short answer: No. Long answer: I stumbled across part of the answer to my question in a comment to an answer for a seemingly unrelated question. It turns out USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 are physically segregated in the wiring. But as Ben Voigt points out, the segregation is also done at the port level within each bus: ...each downstream port negotiates its own ...


21

On my HP laptop, USB 3.0 ports logo/symbol have an "SS" (for Super Speed). USB 2.0 ports only have the typical USB symbol with no "SS". See the following image: http://www.usr.com/education/periphimg/USB-connectors-edu.png


20

According to the USB3 specification from here, USB2 functionality on USB3 hosts/hubs does not change. Therefore, (putting power issues aside) USB2 devices still operate with a broadcast method, meaning it will share the same old USB speed bandwidth with all other USB2 devices on the same host/hub. USB2 devices will not have USB3 capacity available to it, as ...


19

In device manager look for Extensible Host Controller Interface (xHCI) In Universal Serial Bus Controllers. If you have a usb 3.0 you'll have it, if not, not. Here is an example of an Intel USB 3.0 controller in device manager


17

This doesn’t make sense to me. Is there any reason for this? I noticed this as well when I upgraded my Mac Mini to a model with USB 3.0 ports on it; my older USB 2.0 drives would copy data noticeably faster. The logic I believe is not all USB 2.0 controllers are the same. The way I understand it, USB 2.0 speed is spec’ed to be a max speed; not a ...


16

The problem is a bit mysterious until you realize what's happening behind the scenes during a windows install. And, there is a workaround to allow you to use USB 3.0. One workaround is easier in the moment, the other requires a bit of work to setup, but will be easiest for future installs. Introduction: What exactly is the problem Here is a lengthy but ...


14

Visually speaking, USB 3 ports are typically blue, so you can easily differentiate them. They also have 2 extra pins. It is impossible to differntiate versions 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0 from each other visually. However, a computer would have to be pretty old to have version 1 or 1.1 ports. I believe anything on a Pentium 4 or later would be v2 and up. See the ...


14

According the tech specs Left side: two USB 3.0 ports, external monitor (VGA DB-15, HDMI), ethernet (RJ-45) Right side: one USB 2.0 port and one eSATA/USB combo port


13

Try this, ymmv. Install from USB: When Windows is asking for driver, just click Cancel. You will be brought back to the welcome screen. At the welcome screen, remove your USB drive, insert it back to DIFFERENT USB PORT. Click Install Now again. The installation process will be like usual. Also, forget where I found this tidbit "it was the ...


12

USB3 requires new connectors, with more connections in them. These are backwards compatible, Therefore a USB1/USB2 device will plug into a USB3 host, but this means that unless your case has the new connectors, you can't in a USB3 device. You could still use these connectors for USB1/USB2 devices, or use USB3 devices in a USB1/2 compatibility mode.


12

USB3 operates at higher speeds than SATA can handle, so optimally you should notice no difference between USB3 and an internal drive of the same type. In my experience with my own drive, I've noticed this to be true. As for exact speeds, SATA 2 operates at 3 Gb/s optimally, which gives a maximum bandwidth of ~384MB/s. SATA 1 operates at 1.5 Gb/s I believe. ...


11

When using a USB 2.0 device on a USB 3.0 bus, the USB 2.0 speed will be used, so not much will be gained by just replacing the controller.


11

There are two ways to get USB 3.0 on an old PC without having to reach around the back side every time. One option is to get a PCI-E USB 3.0 card, and then run a USB 3.0 extension cable or hub up to the front of your computer. This will probably be the easier option to set up, but maybe not as convenient to use. There are a lot of these available from ...


11

Generally no. Most phones will only charge at 500mA (about half of what a DC charger for a modern smartphone outputs) if it detects it is a USB port. The official standard sets USB 2.0 current levels at 500mA and 3.0 at 950mA. It is not uncommon for USB ports to support 1A or higher though, especially on laptops. The problem lies with the phones. Some ...


10

We’ve also been looking for these for a long time, but no one seemed to make a USB 3.0 Gigabit Ethernet adapter until just this year (2012). But we needed them for a different purpose; we don’t do virtualization but needed to add second full Gigabit Ethernet port to the laptops we send out to be used as network diagnostics equipment. We used to use ...


10

USB 3.0 often has blue lining inside the port. If you want to know specifically for your macbook air, go to apple support page http://support.apple.com/specs/ - Click on "Browse by Product" and enter your Macbook Air serial number. It will show you the Tech Spec specifically for your Macbook Air series, and the tech spec will tell you what USB you have.


9

Wikipedia gives a quite comprehensive comparison: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA#Comparison_with_other_buses


9

Although this is not a software solution, if you use a USB 2 extension cable then it will prevent the 5 USB 3 pins in the plug from physically connecting the wires which carry the USB 3 handshake between the host and device. A USB 2 device or cable only has 4 pins. A USB 3 port will default to USB 2 signaling communication when only 4 pins are connected. A ...


9

USB 3.0 jacks will work with older USB 2.0 cords, but at USB 2.0 speeds. The newer USB 3.0 connectors have more wires to carry the higher data rate.



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