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Some OEMs are indeed stupid and use USB 3.0 controllers, but use USB 2.0 ports (micro USB for example). To see which speed ports support, run a tool called USB Device Tree Viewer and click on each listed port which has the entry IsUserConnectable (here the user can connect USb devices, some are internally used to attach devices like USB card readers) and ...


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TLDR: Try using USB over IP instead of USB2 over USB3. A quick googling shows that your exact question is not possible. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_hub#Transaction_translator Any USB 2.0 hub that supports a higher standard than USB 1.1 (12 Mbit/s) will translate between the lower standard and the higher standard using what is called a transaction ...


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Yes, you are correct. xHCI means USB 3.0 support (red). USB 2.0 is enhanced host controller (green) The blue ones are USB 1.1 (OpenHost) Some OEMs are indeed stupid and use USB 3.0 controllers, but use USB 2.0 ports (micro USB for example). To see this, run a tool called USB Device Tree Viewer and click on each listed port which has the entry ...


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Because of the discussion here, I need to remark that the poster is correct and a USB 2.0 bandwidth limit does exist, as distinct from USB 3.0 bandwidth. Wikipedia USB has this to say : Because there are two separate controllers in each USB 3.0 host, USB 3.0 devices transmit and receive at USB 3.0 data rates regardless of USB 2.0 or earlier devices ...


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Unless I'm severely mistaken the USB 3.0 spec for 20V 5A is the maximum that the connector can handle. That's the connector, not the cable, supply side, or receive side. And it's the maximum, not the standard. Your standard USB 3.0 port will only supply a max of 5V, and current/wattage will be limited to whatever that particular "supplying" USB port is rated ...


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You're asking for 100 watts (20 volta at 5 amps). Even USB 3.1 can only supply 5 volts at 1.8 A, absolute maximum. That's 9 watts. It is flatly not possible to draw 100 watts from a source that can only supply 9. That's why the product you seek does not exist.


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The 20 pin usb 3.0 connector socket passively allows two usb 3.0 female type A sockets two be wired in... With the use of active "hub" you could split these 2 physical connections into multiple connections... But as with all active adaptations... Latency will be introduced; you'll be introducing a "middle man" (or you know another PCB) between your usb 3.0 ...



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