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I did some more research and looked in my Device Manager. I did see one "USB Hub" or some such with an exclamation point on it. And some of my research suggested updating drivers. So I went to ASUS' site and downloaded USB 3.0 drivers, figuring it couldn't hurt, even if they were already installed. It turns out they were not already installed. So my problem ...


0

Host-to-Host Connections USB 3.0 Type-A Connector Detail Unlike USB 2.0, the new standard will allow for two host devices to be connected directly with a USB 3.0 crossover cable. This new cable features the typical Type-A connectors on each end but with a new internal wiring. This cable omits the Vbus, D+ and D- wires (USB2.0 data and voltage) and ...


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According to MS KB 2401954, it is no longer need to spin down the drive for Windows Vista or later. When a USB device is Disabled in Device Manager or Safely Removed using the system tray icon, a Remove Device request (PnP IRP IRP_MN_REMOVE_DEVICE) is issued to perform a "Soft Removal" of the USB device. The USB device is marked as Removed for Plug and ...


0

Thanks everyone for answering. USBView showed that ports were configured as USB3. After error and trial process of changing BIOS settings I found what need to be set in BIOS to make it USB3. If i recall it right all three has to be checked. - USB charging - USB power on - USB legacy support Once port became USB3 drive spins down right after selecting to ...


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I know this is an old post, but I found this via Google and want to share what fixed it for me. I booted from a USB 2.0 flash drive (on a USB 2.0 port) and when it prompted for drivers, I canceled and went back to the "Install now" prompt in the installer. Then I removed my flash drive, plugged it into another computer, and changed the UUID and unset the ...


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I average around 90 MB/sec transferring 10 or so files totaling 30gb on USB 3.0 to either a mechanical HD or a solid state. Windows 7, i5, 16gb RAM, 1TB and 128G Hard drives.


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Why you can't rely on extending a USB 3.0 cable at all. USB 3.0 + USB 2.0 Cables There are a number of existing answers that explain how the USB 3.0 cable contains additional wires specific to USB 3.0 high-speed communication, so you can't use a USB 2.0 cable to extend a USB 3.0 connection and retain the speed. Full-length USB 3.0 cables + hub ...


6

Do all USB 3.0 micro cables use that weird double connector on the small end? Yes. USB 3.0 also introduced a new Micro-B cable plug, which consists of a standard USB 1.x/2.0 Micro-B cable plug, with additional 5-pin plug "stacked" on side of it. That way, USB 3.0 Micro-A host connector preserved its backward compatibility with the USB ...


4

Is it possible to make an extension for an USB 3.0 cable using regular UTP cable? No, because the cables are not compatible: Cat 5 cable contains 4 twisted pairs (8 wires) so it does not contain enough wires. Cat 5 UTP has twisted pairs that are not shielded and only contain 8 wires. Cat 5 STP has twisted pairs the are shielded and only contain 8 wires. ...


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A "USB 3.0 connection" requires a USB 3.0 cable. Some USB 3.0 devices can be connected and operated as a USB 2.0 device (at USB 2.0 speeds), using a USB 2.0 cable. However, speed is not the only issue. There are at least three important differences in cable construction between the two standards. Related to speed: The USB 3.0 cable has 9 internal ...


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A USB 3.0 cable is required for USB 3.0 speeds, but any USB cord will make a connection. Source 1: USB - Wikipedia SuperSpeed [USB 3.0] is supported only by USB 3.0 and newer interfaces, and requires a connector and cable with extra pins and wires, usually distinguishable by the blue inserts in connectors. Source 2: USB 3.0 Super Speeds - ...


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USB 3.0 jacks will work with older USB 2.0 cords, but at USB 2.0 speeds. The newer USB 3.0 connectors have more wires to carry the higher data rate.


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The Build 10130 that you use is a bit old. You should try the latest Build 10162, which you can get from here.


1

Yes you can but it highly depends on the controller. You need to find the right tool for the specified flash drive/controller(USB Mass Production TOOL, aka MPTool). With MPTool you can make a protected partition or simulating a CDROM, either way the file on it will be undeletable, at least from a normal OS or without MPTool. Here is an example to get you ...


2

There is no way to make a regular flash drive read-only. At least not in such a way that it cannot be undone. Some manufacturers works around this by creating a 3 in 1 device in which the seemingly single hardware contains an USB hub, the original device (could be flash storage, 3G etc) and an emulated CDROM drive. But that uses dedicated hardware, not ...


-1

I am not 100% sure about this one, but You should give it a shot: Right click your flash drive in explorer and select 'properties', go to the 'security' tab. At the 'Group or Username' there should be a user named "Everyone". Press 'Edit' and at the checkboxes, look for 'write' > set if for 'deny' Edit: This method will not make the flash drive secure. ...


3

See if this wmic command gives you the answer. I found the command at https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/scriptcenter/en-US/ac769b90-6ad1-46d3-bca4-9141d715e99c/chipset-via-wmi. wmic path win32_pnpentity where "caption like '%Chipset%'" get caption


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You can use this little tool to get details of your system. HWiNFO Look into the Motherboard section of the tool to get the details you require.


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how do I determine which of these 4 offered downloads is the appropriate one for me Only the first two downloads are relevant (the 7-Series and the 8/9-Series). Intel's installers will block installation if an unsupported platform/chipset is detected, so you're safe to just try both. One will work, the other will simply refuse to install ;-) If you ...



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