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In the end, but reading is copying. To "read" a file practically means to "copy into RAM", otherwise programs couldn't work with it. And once that's done, you can't possibly stop every single program from having a "Save As..." or "Copy to..." option. The same applies even to humans. If someone reads a phrase, they will remember it and can write it down by ...


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I've just figured this after a lot of googling all I found were either: People asking "Why do you want to do that?" No answer So sat down and figured it out myself. The problem is the "Removable Disk" status of the flash drives. Windows doesn't let "Removable Disks" become part of the storage spaces pool. Thus this is all you need to solve, convert ...


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Can someone access or retrieve that file from my computer after the the flash drive is removed? Yes. Excel creates Autosave files (if configured to do so) and other temporary files. These files are deleted after Excel is closed but can be "undeleted" using data recovery tools. See Recovering Excel documents that were closed without saving for more ...


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Assuming you are using dd within FreeBSD or Linux: 1) umount /dev/sdb If your USB stick is under /dev/sdb 2) dd if=FreeBSD-10.3-RELEASE-amd64-memstick.img of=/dev/sdb bs=10240 Please note the of=/dev/sdb argument as you are supposed to write to the whole stick instead of its first partition. 3) Now reboot and choose the USB stick as the boot option.


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Try Rufus. Choose your USB drive under Device, choose the desired partition scheme and file system, provide a volume label, uncheck Create a bootable disk using and hit Start.


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According to Kingston Technology Support Kingston has some of the drive allocated to a hidden area. Most likely a certain chip with cells. Not accessible by the user. A hardware hack would allow you to possibly see what is truly being held there. The Hidden area could hold. Reserve cells for longer life of the drive and the firmware as controller ...


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The delay when you do a list disk in diskpart is very telling. It indicates that Windows has problems trying to talk to the controller chip inside the stick. Conclusion: That USB stick is broken. Throw it away.


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Found this issue whilst setting up a 'cleaning lab' for Wyse Thin Clients for recovering customer loaners at Dell where I work.. Solved this in windows with these two fixes: and then ran this from cmd: Bootsect /nt60 D: Voila.


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The flash drive is fried, or at least not functioning. I did this to save the content: put it in the freezer for a couple of hours, and it appeared again for just enough time to copy the contents to the harddrive. Then it disappeared again.



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