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Corsair Flash Survivor Stealth 64GB USB 3.0 uses Sandisk SDYNQGCRM 032GUL memory modules (source): Cropped image (full-size on click): There is not much info about these modules on the Internet, but flash support list for IS903 USB 3.0 single chip UFD controller lists them as MLC ones: This document is not available on the Innostor website, but ...


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I did that with winusb. To install it run: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:colingille/freshlight && \ sudo sh -c "sed -i 's/trusty/saucy/g' /etc/apt/sources.list.d/colingille-freshlight-trusty.list" && \ sudo apt-get update && \ sudo apt-get install winusb Then i think you can use this program without my help. UPDATE: You can try ...


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You can get your files back when you have restore points (shadows) from before the mishap - with a program called Shadow Explorer. Here is a little tutorial I made to show you how that works: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/132087-shadowexplorer-recover-lost-files-folders.html#post1137368 If you want to make a quick check whether you have restore ...


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You can place your Windows installation on a USB 3.0 storage device by using the following guide created by whs. This same guide according to the author can be used for any version of Windows 7 and Windows 8.x. Step 1 - Check the speed of your USB stick To measure the speed of your stick I recommend HD Tune. It provides data regarding the data ...


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Open an elevated Command Prompt and run: fsutil dirty query X: Where X: is the drive letter of the flash drive. If it is 'dirty', then you have only 2 options - either you run the chkdsk or you save your files and reformat the flash drive. Another (theoretical) option is to clear the dirty bit with a hex editor. But that is pretty tricky and I have not ...


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If you simply want to create a USB-based installer, just use Rufus:


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ExFat formatted SD cards allow for 4 gig of Readboost cache. Exfat is a flash friendly successor to Fat32 on larger flash devices. It removes the file size directory limits of FAT32. It has less overhead and writes less to device than NTFS. It is less robust than NTFS, since (as in FATxx ) there is no protective journal. In a purely Caching ...


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You could try USBGuard. It implements a USB device blacklist/whitelist on top of UDev and the Linux kernel USB authorization framework. You could achieve the same using UDev as already proposed, but USBGuard is a dedicated tool for that job and it has a rule language and an (optional) GUI applet. Since USB flash disks usually have a serial number, then ...


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The unallocated space will be used to replace memory cells which fail. Flash memory devices are manufactured with considerable excess, and when a cell fails, it can no longer be written to, but it can be read from, At that point, the controller on board will copy the memory content to a new, unallocated, cell, and then mark the old cell out of use.



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