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http://sg.danny.cz/scsi/smartmontools_scsi.html: SMART never attained the status of "standard" and its original documents have been withdrawn. Its catchy name lives on, especially on vendors' web sites and obviously in the name of this toolset. Luckily the good ideas in SMART have been incorporated into the ATA and SCSI standards albeit in ...


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Is such a fast pendrive a good choice for a system disk? Fast is always good. Based on the sequential speeds alone, there's no reason to not choose it. Overall however it's hard to tell, because as you've said yourself, random and small-block I/O performance is quite important, and you don't have that information available. It is however usually possible ...


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Try doing this... You will be able to boot onto the USB after running the Internet Recovery Tool. https://support.apple.com/en-ca/HT201314 Boot into the Internet Recovery by holding command + R. Using the disk utility, click on the USB Device. After clicking the connected USB device, format it to Mac Extended Journaled Hard Drive. Click apply or ...


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You should not get a system crash unless you manage to trigger a kernel bug by this. There may be some lurking, as unplugging active swap devices is most likely not a common test scenario. If your system doesn't crash, your applications will die one by one as soon as they try to access any of the swapped out pages that are no longer available. It's by far ...


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So I tested it. After unplugging pendrive system encounters immediete panic. Even there was actually some spare RAM so swap wasn't actively accessed at the time of device unplug, still it caused system crash. Nothing has been recorded by system journal, just like in case of filesystem crash. It might be eventually caused by btrfs I use because systems using ...


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If you unplug a flashdrive during a write operation, the file will become damaged and you lose its contents. Next time you open it, it'll give you an error. If the write operation occurs on the file table itself, it may cause the flashdrive to become labelled as empty telling you that you need to format the drive.


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For unplugging, the OS will sync the data during the unmount operation. Thus, if the disk is unmounted (assuming you in fact do have full hardware support) you can power off the disk then unplug it without risk of data loss or corruption. A partition map can be corrupted by an incomplete write operation. If it was just the partition table that was ...


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Seems like I've done it. I've installed grub using grub-install from another linux distribution into the usb stick. That allowed my to boot on my USB stick from the BIOS. Then, I've copied another copy of grub inside of an EFI folder that allows me to boot from EFI. I have actually two grubs installed but it works...


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In my experience, getting BIOS-mode and EFI-mode GRUBs to coexist on one medium can be tricky, since they may want to use the same configuration file, but have different needs for that. To be sure, it can be made to work, but unless you're very knowledgeable about GRUB, have very explicit instructions from somebody who has that knowledge, or are very lucky, ...


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My guess is your GUI is automounting the device to some location when you plug it in. For example, when I plug a USB stick in to my Mate/Marco 1.12 system: [root@frog ~]# mount ... ... /dev/sdg on /run/media/pgoetz/4474-E825 type vfat (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,uid= 1001,gid=1001,fmask=0022,dmask=0022,codepage=437,iocharset=iso8859-1, ...


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This may happen also when there is insufficient power supply to the flash from the usb port. Check that you are not overloading the usb ports with power hungry peripheralas. Also tortured USB cables, if there are any connected, may sometimes leak current and reduce the available power.



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