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1

Spinning and head parking are not as big a problem as the data that is not fully written out. Be it a hard disk or a flash disk or a SSD drive, the systems that we use them with can have data being activly written to them even when not user initiated. Internally in the disk items whatever data that was about to be written, is not nessisarily completly in ...


1

Removing a flash drive or ssd won't damage the drive, but you could lose data if there are any writes that haven't been committed to disk yet.


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It could be faulty, but more likely it just needs formatting. Follow these instructions and see how you go (it's a sandisk website but procedure is the same): http://kb.sandisk.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/107/~/formatting-a-drive-or-device-using-disk-management When you choose between formatting as exFAT and NTFS, check what your DVR supports if you need ...


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I met the same issue with two different USB keys on both Windows 7 and XP. I can confirm minya's bit of information. I thought it'll work with a partition type 'HIDDEN' for the first partition, but nope: even then only the "hidden" partition is shown and usable under both Windows versions (DISK management tool shows all partitions but does not read the ...


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I think you are over thinking it. To rename a USB, just go to explorer, plug your drive in, once the drive comes up, click it once, then again. The name will be highlighted for you to change. Type the new name and hit enter. Done!


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USB drives have a 4GB individual file size limitation and 32GB maximum volume size. For a UEFI system to recognize a boot drive, it needs to be a FAT32 format. In this case the best option would be to partition your USB drive. Since you are on a windows machine, I recommend using a free tool called Partition Master. There are a lot of other tools if you ...


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If your USB drive is FAT formated, the maxmimum Size for a single file is limited to 4GB. If you need to copy bigger files you have to format it in NTFS.


1

Yep! This is possible, I've had the problem before. What you need to do is format the thumb drive to NTFS. Right click on the thumb drive Click "Format" Choose NTFS edit: PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WILL ERASE ALL DATA ON THE THUMB DRIVE


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The way a USB Thumb Drive organizes data internally is transparent to a host. Just like a hard drive, data is written and read using LBA (Logical Block Addressing): http://wiki.osdev.org/LBA When a host sends data to a LBA block on a Thumb Drive, the Thumb Drive is free to store that data in any way it likes, so long as the same data is returned when you ...


1

The USB mass storage device class (also known as USB MSC or UMS) is a set of computing communications protocols defined by the USB Implementers Forum that makes a USB device accessible to a host computing device and enables file transfers between the host and the USB device. from the WikiPedia page. Here is a boring, technical PDF titled ...


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I dealt with this problem with my SanDisk drive and the only solution for me was to purchase another drive. Check your drive in the "This PC" menu of your computer. Flash drives usually show up as a removable disk. This information about this drive being bootable or or is usually contained within the flash drive itself. Here is mine, for example: . To ...


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After spending some time with partitioning finally found a solution. When partitioning the flash disk (cFast) using built-in windows disk management, in order to be able to install an operating system to it the partition must be marked as Primary and Active.


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Yes, you can set up network drives as target, check this microsoft article, http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-8/set-drive-file-history It is mandatory to use external drive for the target. I believe you would like to know about the Windows Image Backup. Yes, full disk backups are supported in Windows8. To backup, open the "Control Panel -> ...


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The root directory on a FAT16 filesystem can store only a limited number of file entries Your flash drive is 2 GB in size. This is the maximum filesystem size supported by FAT16. As such, it is likely that it was formatted with the FAT16 filesystem from the factory. Due to a technical limitation in the FAT16 filesystem, only a limited number of file ...


0

When I've gotten this, it turned out that, for reasons I've never fully understood, the USB device had put itself in read-only mode or been marked by the OS as read-only. The only way I've found to fix it has been to back up the information on the flash device and recreate its partition table, partitions, and filesystem. In Linux, you'd do that with fdisk ...


0

To be honest I recommend against such automated usb makers, one can often do exactly the same with standard GNU/linux tools, eg dd, grub and syslinux (and there are windows ports of said tools.) But, to answer your question, it could be a number of things. Perhaps the tools in question are not designed with the idea of a 64gb usb stick in mind, perhaps the ...


0

Some usb stick manufacturers factory partition drives with tables not suitable for creating a bootable drive. Formatting makes no difference as it does not affect the tables, just erases the contents of the primary, visible partition. (I had issues with a "reputable" brand before with this issue.) If you have access to a Linux box, plug the drive in, find ...


0

Looks like your USB stick appears as an external hard drive to the OS. While Linux doesn't care and gives you a standard /dev/sdX device node for it, on which you can still dd almost any ISO image on (I do that with the Archlinux ISO all the time and it works perfectly), Windows obviously likes to complicate things and that doesn't work too well. In ...


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For Windows 7, you can use the information here to download the appropriate Windows install disc and load it onto a bootable USB drive. For Windows 8.1, I would suggest this page which will let you download the correct media and walk you through the process of creating a bootable USB drive or DVD disc. For Linux, I would suggest a program like PenDrive ...


0

The solution iSR5 gave WORKS! I just fixed the same problem. I was simply watching a video and the computer just shut off like it was shocked or something. It wouldn't turn on after holding down the power button nor was the light on at the bottom left of the laptop indicating charging. I took out all the screws on the bottom of the laptop and opened it by ...


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While installing Windows 7 you get offered to load third-party Drivers. In the bottom-left corner it says "Load Driver". You should check your USB Device Manufacturers Website for additional drivers.


1

Size of a Block A 3-dimensional track (the same track on all disks) is called a cylinder. Each track is divided into 63 sectors. Each sector contains 512 bytes of data. Therefore the block size in the partition table is 64 heads * 63 sectors * 512 bytes er... divided by 1024... :-) Any time Linux refers to block size, it is almost always 1024 bytes - ...


1

This is usually how they die. You can try using it on another PC and it may work better. You may also want to try remove all other USB devices first. The idea is that your USB hub may have low power which is causing issues with the flash drive. Also, use a USB port directly connected to your motherboard.


0

This can be corrected using the GParted Live CD. I did all of the above with an 8 GB Sandisk Cruzer, experiencing the same failures in Windows 7, but GParted has no problems at all accessing it. Create new partition table, type msdos Create primary partition, type fat32 Set active attribute http://gparted.org/livecd.php


1

for those wanting to convert the drive instead of using a transparent virtual disk, or link... (took me around 20 minutes to convert a 32GB USB drive to vmdk) VBoxManage convertfromraw \\.\PhysicalDrive2 D:\VirtualMachines.vmdk --format vmdk *\.\PhysicalDrive = number of your USB drive found in Disk Management *D:\VirtualMachines = this is the path I ...


0

Try formatting the flash drive to NTFS drive and copy the specified files back to the your flash drive and now check whether its playing the media files without any issue.


0

What about ssh transfer to another computer? If you have the need access this will be a good variant. See this topic http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/106480/how-to-copy-files-from-one-machine-to-another-using-ssh


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I think this thread is the solution you are looking for : http://superuser.com/a/139935/395792 Especially the 2nd part of the post.


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I also have a 64 gig flash drive from PNY, I put a bunch of files and pictures on it using an older laptop with windows XP. All was fine until I tried to retieve files on an HP / Compaq laptop with windows 7. It continues to work fine with the XP software. Somehow I might have downloaded a driver from Microsoft for WIN XP, think it was called "xformat" but ...



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