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0

Brute force: put a USB sniffer between the USB stick and the player, to directly observe how the player corrupts the FAT32 filesystem. At $400 retail, or many hours soldering together the open-source one, I'm not prepared to get one just to solve this. But others may like this approach.


0

Does it do it on other computers? If no, it's probably an issue with either your USB reader in your computer or with the install of windows you have. If yes, it might mean it's about to fail. It also might mean that the USB just has some weird data on it that's confusing windows. If you have data on it you don't want to lose, you should back it up, just in ...


0

Very Tricky situation. Maybe it's the USB flash drive which was designed to run only on windows.You did not mention the name of the brand of your usb flash drive.Sometimes some usb flash drives belonging to certain brands behave that way.


1

The whole “installing driver” shebang appears only on Windows. It’s actually more like “registering new device instance” anyway. On other operating systems, the process is essentially the same, of course, but managed differently. For example, there are two ways to handle multiple similar devices: Either an isolated driver instance is running for each of them ...


1

Since the past two decades, certain hardware aspects have become very standardized, so that it is easy to actually embed these drivers in the firmware (or in the case of linux, the kernel). If you look at the drivers in use for USB storage, it is nearly always the same, regardless of manufacturer, size, etc. The same goes for (most) USB keyboards and other ...


1

There are a few articles out there about the differences between SSDs and Flash drives. SSD just means a hard disk that doesn’t move Flash is a type of memory that is very fast and doesn’t require continuous power (non-volatile) SSDs used to use RAM, but now use Flash instead In short, you shouldn’t compare Flash to SSD just as you shouldn’t compare ...


0

This article looks promising: Hacking USB Webkeys The brains of the Webkey is all stuffed into a tiny chip that fits into your USB port. If you pop that chip out of its casing and peel off the glue, you'll get something like this. The part number of this particular Webkey is "WEB-130C". JJShortcut wrote up a great article describing how to ...


-1

Most SSDs use NAND, although better ones may use faster memory like DRAM. I think one of the biggest differences is simply that SSD drives are made to a higher standard than USB flash drives. Flash drives are typically used for data transport and short term storage, so they don't need to be as reliable as an SSD.


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I can't think of any reason to use USB flash drives for backups. First off, read the reviews of the most popular 128 GB USB flash drive on Newegg and ask yourself if you want to use that for backups: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820178689 Some choice quotes: Cons: Bought 4 and they all worked worked in the beginning but all ...


17

Reliable? Short answer, no. I get through hundreds of flash drives for work & the fail rate is such that I wouldn't trust tonight's dinner recipe to one if it was a mission-critical dinner ;-)


0

Data loss is accelerated at higher temperatures. You would need to consult the manufacturer's specification for a particular device. Sandisk use the Arrhenius equation: SANDISK MEMORY VAULT TECHNOLOGY, which appears to be in line with the JEDEC method referred to in Industrial Temperature and NAND Flash in SSD Products: At around room temperature, you can ...


1

Glad you answered your own question. OK, usually, the way to nuke a disk is to zero-out the partition table with dd if=/dev/zero of=<RAW-DEVICE> bs=512 count=1. That would be the end of the story, but apparently doing so might be prevented by the OS. Via Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table#Legacy_MBR_.28LBA_0.29 ...


0

I was able to fix the problem myself using gdisk. In fact no other program was able to tell me what's really the problem. It's this: Found invalid GPT and valid MBR; converting MBR to GPT format in memory. THIS OPERATION IS POTENTIALLY DESTRUCTIVE! Exit by typing 'q' if you don't want to convert your MBR partitions to GPT format! AND Warning! ...


0

Almost all modern (post 2000) Linux distribution(s) (aka distro(s)) can / do run on older hardware to include the one you mentioned having FROM a USB stick AND with under 2Gb RAM with or without swap (aka page file in windows -- drive space used as additional ram) which can be used FROM a USB with noticeable degrading of life cycle of the USB and its r/w ...


2

Use something like UNetbootin to automatically download and create a Ubuntu LiveUSB with persistence: This will quite likely kill your flash drive fairly quickly though depending on the amount of data written to it.


3

I bet this is a virus. This occurs when you plug your USB on a system that has this virus. It just hides all the files in the drive, and creates a shortcut to a virus exe. That shortcut surprises the users of other systems, and when they run it, it's activated. You can simply get rid of this with a boot time antivirus scan, and WinRar (Trial version works) ...


1

Check for some other common problems like: Unable to make visible hidden and system files Unable to Safely remove that external device Same kind of shortcuts started appearing in other external devices that you connect Some new unusual processes found in task manager If some of these problems are there in your system then it is most probably occurring ...


4

This appears to be a long-standing virus. I recommend ensuring that your virus checker is up-to-date and running a full scan. You might want to also investigate some additional anti-malware tools such as: SuperAntiSpyware Malwarebytes SlimClean BleachBit There are a number of places giving advice on how to remove the virus including "How to Remove ...


-1

At first I would try to figure out the real capacity, because market is full of counterfeit USB flash drives from China, e.g. using: H2testw 1.4 – Gold Standard In Detecting USB Counterfeit Drives (win/mac/linux) And then, if applicable, I would try to repair it (by fixing VID+PID).


-3

The only solution increase your virtual memory until your speed goes fast. Note: windows 7 needs 8gb minimum memory to transfer files fast to usb cause windows 7 eats too much memory. Windows xp only needs 1 gb to make it run fast even in copying files to usb.


0

In Windows you can use Diskpart (commandline) and Format (GUI): diskpart list disk select disk X (X = correct disk No.) clean create partition primary list partition (just to be sure) exit (go back to GUI) format the disk Worked for me in W7/64.


0

Have a look to my answer at this question: How do I reformat an unmountable/unrecognised/unformatted USB drive? You could try to format your drive with diskpart.


0

Please check in your BIOS/UEFI how external USB devices are handled. In some BIOS, there is an option. You can handle all USB devices as hard disks or as removables, or you let the system decide. The last one should be the default setting. Maybe restoring you BIOS default settings can help, but you'll have to apply changes you made again.


0

in Windows Vista or higher, you can try to format it with diskpart. Open a cmd.exe with administrative privileges and type "diskpart". The command "lis dis" lists all your storage devices. If your USB stick is on the list (e.g. device number 3), you can select it with "sel dis 3". Then you can reformat it with "clean", "create partition primary" and ...


0

You can bypass that error with Computer Management. Execute compmgmt.msc on the command line: When the application opens, under Storage select Disk Management. this will search for all the drives attached to the computer. Now find your flash drive in the middle window and right-click on it, and finally choose Format:


1

Try this piece of software: NosleepHD: http://nosleephd.codeplex.com/ It writes an empty file every minute.


0

The following elevated commands successfully granted ownership of the 64 GB USB flash drives to my logged on user: takeown /F driveLetter: /R /D Y icacls driveLetter: /setowner domainOrHostname\username /T /C Command #2, icacls, is much faster but consistently reports the following, for some reason: Successfully processed x files; Failed processing x ...


0

You don't. What's showing in your picture is how the factory firmware on the flash drive reports it make (manufacturer name) and model (product name) to the host machine. To change it, you would have to re-flash the device's firmware (or, if it's not flashable, replace its ROM) with a firmware image that reports a different manufacturer and product name.


0

Run disk management and delete the partition. It seems like you can access the partition so disk management shouldn't have any problems.


1

Drop the partition part (disks1 part in bold) as you write to the drive NOT a partition (for the context of this question at least -- as there are MORE ADVANCED use cases and ways to safely do to a partition) As for the 4M size issue how big is the actual USB stick ? is there other stuff on the stick presently ---if so back it up if its meaningful to you ...


1

Let's dissect the error. dd: bs: illegal numeric value bs: you set bs=4M in your command line. illegal numeric value: This means the value of bs isn't valid ("legal") If I recall correctly, the "m" in bs has to be lowercase. Of course you can use bs=4000000 (4 million, 4M) instead to avoid this. Also, the guide (I assume) you are using is assuming ...


0

You need a linux system for my solution, but a linux system helps very often. Backup all your data from that drive, we will overwrite it. Find the device using blkid It will be like /dev/sdd. Now run: dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdd bs=4M count=10 This will overwrite the partition table and the first 40MB. After doing this, just create the partitioning ...


1

The flash drive is failing and should be replaced. The most likely cause of this issue is flash memory that is wearing out. Flash memory has limited endurance and USB flash drives tend to use lower-grade NAND which has lower endurance than the types found in SSDs. See: Can a USB thumb drive "wear out"? This problem cannot be resolved by the end user. The ...


1

How do I fix it? Just buy a new one. Flash drives are cheap, especially 8 GB ones. Sometimes such drives can be salvaged by low-level formatting with appropriate tools, but these are very rare cases and the fix isn't permanent. Failing parts of flash drive often indicate that its overall state will be getting worse because of flash teardown.


0

Insert USB Disk. Launch the imageUSB program that you used to create the MemTest86 USB and select the appropriate USB Disk. (Be careful and select the correct drive!). Choose the Zero USB Disk option & Run. Drive MBR (Master Boot Record) is now Zeroed. You will need to reinsert the drive for Windows to recognize it and prompt for formatting before you ...



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