New answers tagged

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In my little knwoledge to avoid formating windows you can try a live usb linux disk (or any other Operating System), so you can check if it is a hardware problem (the electric discharge may have fried some really sensitive circuit) or just a windows software problem. When trying to boot from usb (UEFI or BIOS) you'll already know if USB port works.


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I can't comment because of insufficient points, but you must have changed boot order of drives like first Removable USB drive, then SATA drives etc. Try resetting your Boot order or make sure the SATA drive is on top where the windows is installed. If you don't know how to do this I can explain, if you dont want to do this you can reset BIOS by entering ...


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It is entirely possible. The host machine machine could have a script or program that copies or backs up the USB drive on insertion. Once a machine has access to your drive, it can do anything with that data. Simply put, do not give a machine access your drive/data that you do not trust, as you do not know what it might do with it.


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Can someone access or retrieve that file from my computer after the the flash drive is removed? Yes. Excel creates Autosave files (if configured to do so) and other temporary files. These files are deleted after Excel is closed but can be "undeleted" using data recovery tools. See Recovering Excel documents that were closed without saving for more ...


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As seen in the linked questions, little can be done when a flashdrive is listed as 0b. I decided to simply purchase a new flash drive instead of delving any deeper.


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The flash drive is fried, or at least not functioning. I did this to save the content: put it in the freezer for a couple of hours, and it appeared again for just enough time to copy the contents to the harddrive. Then it disappeared again.


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I've just figured this after a lot of googling all I found were either: People asking "Why do you want to do that?" No answer So sat down and figured it out myself. The problem is the "Removable Disk" status of the flash drives. Windows doesn't let "Removable Disks" become part of the storage spaces pool. Thus this is all you need to solve, convert ...


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Assuming you are using dd within FreeBSD or Linux: 1) umount /dev/sdb If your USB stick is under /dev/sdb 2) dd if=FreeBSD-10.3-RELEASE-amd64-memstick.img of=/dev/sdb bs=10240 Please note the of=/dev/sdb argument as you are supposed to write to the whole stick instead of its first partition. 3) Now reboot and choose the USB stick as the boot option.


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Try Rufus. Choose your USB drive under Device, choose the desired partition scheme and file system, provide a volume label, uncheck Create a bootable disk using and hit Start.


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If you are trying to write the image to USB on Windows, try Rufus. Choose your USB drive under Device, check Create a bootable disk using and select DD Image from the drop down, browse to the image file and hit Start. It is unclear from your description if your problem is solely with drive creation or with booting off a USB key that is likely good (the dd ...


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Found this issue whilst setting up a 'cleaning lab' for Wyse Thin Clients for recovering customer loaners at Dell where I work.. Solved this in windows with these two fixes: and then ran this from cmd: Bootsect /nt60 D: Voila.


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hey your usb may be corrupted or something like that do one thing take data back up and formate it 2-3 times for corrupted drive found this article check out : How To Repair Corrupted Pen Drive


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As others said, having a swap file on a RAMdisk makes no sense whatsoever, because the whole point of a swap file is to extend RAM. If you add a RAM disk you are taking away from RAM the size of the RAMDISK, and you add back the same amount of with the swapfile in the RAMDisk so the end sum is zero gain. In fact you are worse off because of the overhead of a ...


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According to Kingston Technology Support Kingston has some of the drive allocated to a hidden area. Most likely a certain chip with cells. Not accessible by the user. A hardware hack would allow you to possibly see what is truly being held there. The Hidden area could hold. Reserve cells for longer life of the drive and the firmware as controller ...


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It's not practically possible because if someone can read it, he/she can also copy it. Even if you control the machine/computer, they can still capture the photos of the screen. Secudrive offers secured USB drives: http://www.secudrives.com/products/USB-security that is something similar to Amazon copy-protection drive you've mentioned in your question.


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In the end, but reading is copying. To "read" a file practically means to "copy into RAM", otherwise programs couldn't work with it. And once that's done, you can't possibly stop every single program from having a "Save As..." or "Copy to..." option. The same applies even to humans. If someone reads a phrase, they will remember it and can write it down by ...


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One method that makes USB media visible to FreeDOS 1.1 is to setup the BIOS and boot environment before the system is booted into a session than needs access to the USB media. Make sure that the system BIOS is set to support USB mass storage. For example, in one AMI BIOS, the setting is: Advanced | USB Configuration | USB Storage Device Support | ...


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The problem description indicates that the damage is corruption due to data transmission errors rather than damage to the hardware. This may be due to incorrect timing, incorrect driving voltages or incorrect terminating impedance. If increasing the length of the cable from hub to computer fixes anything, I would suspect an impedance mismatch, in which case ...


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You can try Transcend's RecoveRx software available on official transcend website. I think it will definitely work.


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The delay when you do a list disk in diskpart is very telling. It indicates that Windows has problems trying to talk to the controller chip inside the stick. Conclusion: That USB stick is broken. Throw it away.


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My guess is your GUI is automounting the device to some location when you plug it in. For example, when I plug a USB stick in to my Mate/Marco 1.12 system: [root@frog ~]# mount ... ... /dev/sdg on /run/media/pgoetz/4474-E825 type vfat (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,uid= 1001,gid=1001,fmask=0022,dmask=0022,codepage=437,iocharset=iso8859-1, ...


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For unplugging, the OS will sync the data during the unmount operation. Thus, if the disk is unmounted (assuming you in fact do have full hardware support) you can power off the disk then unplug it without risk of data loss or corruption. A partition map can be corrupted by an incomplete write operation. If it was just the partition table that was ...


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If you unplug a flashdrive during a write operation, the file will become damaged and you lose its contents. Next time you open it, it'll give you an error. If the write operation occurs on the file table itself, it may cause the flashdrive to become labelled as empty telling you that you need to format the drive.



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