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You don't. What's showing in your picture is how the factory firmware on the flash drive reports it make (manufacturer name) and model (product name) to the host machine. To change it, you would have to re-flash the device's firmware (or, if it's not flashable, replace its ROM) with a firmware image that reports a different manufacturer and product name.


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Run disk management and delete the partition. It seems like you can access the partition so disk management shouldn't have any problems.


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Drop the partition part (disks1 part in bold) as you write to the drive NOT a partition (for the context of this question at least -- as there are MORE ADVANCED use cases and ways to safely do to a partition) As for the 4M size issue how big is the actual USB stick ? is there other stuff on the stick presently ---if so back it up if its meaningful to you ...


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Let's dissect the error. dd: bs: illegal numeric value bs: you set bs=4M in your command line. illegal numeric value: This means the value of bs isn't valid ("legal") If I recall correctly, the "m" in bs has to be lowercase. Of course you can use bs=4000000 (4 million, 4M) instead to avoid this. Also, the guide (I assume) you are using is assuming ...


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You need a linux system for my solution, but a linux system helps very often. Backup all your data from that drive, we will overwrite it. Find the device using blkid It will be like /dev/sdd. Now run: dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdd bs=4M count=10 This will overwrite the partition table and the first 40MB. After doing this, just create the partitioning ...


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The flash drive is failing and should be replaced. The most likely cause of this issue is flash memory that is wearing out. Flash memory has limited endurance and USB flash drives tend to use lower-grade NAND which has lower endurance than the types found in SSDs. See: Can a USB thumb drive "wear out"? This problem cannot be resolved by the end user. The ...


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How do I fix it? Just buy a new one. Flash drives are cheap, especially 8 GB ones. Sometimes such drives can be salvaged by low-level formatting with appropriate tools, but these are very rare cases and the fix isn't permanent. Failing parts of flash drive often indicate that its overall state will be getting worse because of flash teardown.


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Insert USB Disk. Launch the imageUSB program that you used to create the MemTest86 USB and select the appropriate USB Disk. (Be careful and select the correct drive!). Choose the Zero USB Disk option & Run. Drive MBR (Master Boot Record) is now Zeroed. You will need to reinsert the drive for Windows to recognize it and prompt for formatting before you ...


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Found same problem on a 32GB USB 3.0 Drive (Win 8.1 Laptop with 4x USB 3.0 ports). Read elsewhere that connecting too slowly will produce this effect (reads as High-Speed 0x02 connection instead of SuperSpeed 0x03). I removed the drive (using eject pop-up window), waited a few seconds and reconnected quickly. The connection now reads correctly as ...


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This is pretty old so maybe you found a solution but for anyone who finds this later, I am posting an answer. The USB firmware may be the problem. You can update the firmware of a USB device, which may resolve the problem. Here is a link that enumerates various SWs to do so: ...


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In windows: Uncheck quick format and try again. Try different format like fat and exfat. Try different allocation size. (I suggest default or 16kb) Check if rust or dirt is collected in the port,clean with spirit(flammable) allow time to dry . (Be careful. last resort.)open it and clean Throughly but carefully, with spirit.(when its not connected to ...


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You can run Uwe Sieber's RescanDevices utility: When an IDE or SATA drive has been prepared for safe removal it can be reactivated by a scan for new hardware. That's what this tool initiates. It is a ... Windows application. It does the same as Microsoft's tool DEVCON when called with parameter 'rescan', but no console window pops up. ...


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If you simply want to create a USB-based installer, just use Rufus:


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Unetbootin is designed specifically for Linux distributions and will not work if you are trying to create a Live Windows USB. You can use an application called WinToUSB to achieve this. However, you will need to have access to a Windows computer to start the installation process.


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I fixed the same UNetbootin countdown error by reformatting the USB drive to FAT32 and then trying the same way as before with UNetbootin.


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i found this useful 1.Right click on the Drive 2.Format 3.Choose File System as NTFS 4.choose Allocation unit size as 64KB 5.Start


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The partition on it is not marked as EFS, is it? I had a problem with this recently, using my UEFI bootable usb stick to transfer a file to a win7 laptop.


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Open up a command prompt as administrator (open the Start menu, search for "Command Prompt", right-click and select "Run As Administrator". You'll get a black text-only window that pops up. Type diskpart and press Enter. You'll end up with a new prompt that looks like this: DISKPART> Type list disk, and you'll get a listing of all drives on your machine. ...


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Open an elevated Command Prompt and run: fsutil dirty query X: Where X: is the drive letter of the flash drive. If it is 'dirty', then you have only 2 options - either you run the chkdsk or you save your files and reformat the flash drive. Another (theoretical) option is to clear the dirty bit with a hex editor. But that is pretty tricky and I have not ...


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You can place your Windows installation on a USB 3.0 storage device by using the following guide created by whs. This same guide according to the author can be used for any version of Windows 7 and Windows 8.x. Step 1 - Check the speed of your USB stick To measure the speed of your stick I recommend HD Tune. It provides data regarding the data ...


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if you are using windows 7. Do the following. Open Windows Registry Head to 'HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE' Then to 'SOFTWAFRE' Next 'MICROSOFT' Look for 'Windows Device Manger', click it On the Right see a registry by the name '(Default)'? Double click it Enter the value '0' Hit enter and then exit Totally Works. Keeps your Autoplay option, but Player no longer ...


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You can simply wipe first 1 MB of your USB stick: dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdb bs=1M count=1 and then reformat it to FAT32 again. Be careful though: make sure that /dev/sdb is really your flash drive, or you will kill contents of your real hard drive!


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To prevent indexing your external drive, you can add it to Privacy rule in Spotlight (System Preferences). To prevent .DS_Store files from being created, run: defaults write com.apple.desktopservices DSDontWriteNetworkStores true Source: How to Prevent .DS_Store File Creation Alternatively to prevent indexing create empty file .metadata_never_index ...


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Most likely your files are gone. But not all is lost (literally): Depending on how crowded your storage medium was, and how many other changes have happened to your filesystem, the data might still be there, fully or partially. The way it works when you overwrite a file is that the filesystem table is updated with the new location of the file, after the ...


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The unallocated space will be used to replace memory cells which fail. Flash memory devices are manufactured with considerable excess, and when a cell fails, it can no longer be written to, but it can be read from, At that point, the controller on board will copy the memory content to a new, unallocated, cell, and then mark the old cell out of use.


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You can get your files back when you have restore points (shadows) from before the mishap - with a program called Shadow Explorer. Here is a little tutorial I made to show you how that works: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/132087-shadowexplorer-recover-lost-files-folders.html#post1137368 If you want to make a quick check whether you have restore ...


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You could try USBGuard. It implements a USB device blacklist/whitelist on top of UDev and the Linux kernel USB authorization framework. You could achieve the same using UDev as already proposed, but USBGuard is a dedicated tool for that job and it has a rule language and an (optional) GUI applet. Since USB flash disks usually have a serial number, then ...


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If you know the order the sticks were plugged in you could use dmesg to see which USB device was mapped to /dev/sd*, they should show up there in the same order they were plugged in. Also, if you could try udevadm info -q path -n /dev/sdb and iterate over the possible devices to see which has the USB connection info matching the stick you want.



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