New answers tagged

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You may need to unplug your device and reconnect it. Do you have any other guests in Virtualbox?


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You should at least specify what unable to detect pendrive means. There are several things you can try though: determine if the usb flash drive works well in another computer boot into BIOS and see, if BIOS can detect the pendrive (boot with pendrive plugged in) check your device manager (devmgmt.msc) under Universal serial bus controllers, eventually ...


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The power options or device manager options never worked for me with Windows 8, 8.1 or 10. Below is a simply batch script to do the job. Open a text editor, copy-paste the commands, change the drive letter to match your HDD's, to add another drive replicate the copy, del commands once more, save it as a .bat or .cmd file and double click to run. @echo off :...


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The presence of a Boot Sector that bootstraps a system image of some kind. In the old days, to make a floppy MS-DOS bootable, you had to format it to be bootable (which created a MBR on the 1st and 63rd sectors of the disk, and marked the partition as Active) and copy some system files to it. Some filesystems and BIOSes require special flags to tell the BIOS ...


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Often the front USBs on a motherboard are not the same as the one's integrated in the back of the motherboard. I have an ASRock Z97 which has USB 3.0 on the back, but only 2.0 rated for the front. Check your motherboard documentation to be sure.


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Simpler Method: Windows (10 at least) creates an entry in the event log when you try to eject a removable drive and you cannot because a process has a lock on it. One entry shows the process ID and the other the name of the process responsible for the lock. Background: 1) Start the event viewer 2) Open up "Windows Logs" then "System" 3) Right click on "...


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As you probably noticed already, cloning a disk image implies that the space on both devices is the same or otherwise the files could need to be repositioned on the device which can therefore put the kernel or its launcher at a different place than where the boot sector is actually pointing. Of course, the contents of the first USB stick must absolutely be ...


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The USB requirement vary with your Windows version. If your are using Windows 10 32-bit than a 4 GB USB stick is sufficient. But for a Windows 10 64-bit system I will advice you to use a 8GB stick. Note: Recovery drive feature only works with a USB stick. If you want to use a DVD, then create a System Image instead.


2

Given the price usb USB pendrives and that windows acts weird with removeable pendrives with multiple partitions I would advice to store on two different sticks. That is if you want ot go this way, after all you wrote "the data is highly confidential". Storing that on easy accesible removeable media is not a good way. At the very least you want to add ...


2

From an engineering perspective, all the partitions on a USB are on the same physical chip. In case the chip fails, you lose both. However, talking of bad sectors, then yes in case the bad sectors affect one partition, the other can still be accessed. For this, make sure the partitions are all primary and not logical. Logical partitions are software ...


0

Take a look at easy2boot It requires windows for building the initial image(s), but supports almost any bootable image file. You simply add iso images to the usb drive and select which image you want during the boot process. It also supports live cd type images with persistent storage (i.e. winPE based gandalf). You can also add arbitrary installers, files,...


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A 4GB USB stick will never provide 4GB worth of storage space. I'm unsure the exact size of the WIM and boot/recovery files but they're often bigger than the average 4GB stick average capacity in total.


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In a nutshell, all three tasks can be done on the same USB stick. You can simply install the Ubuntu OS on the USB stick, that should take care of all three tasks for you. I personally think using a Live CD on a USB stick is better for what you're looking for. In order to do that, the first thing you'll need is a program called YUMI. This will allow you ...


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Open Windows CMD (Win Button + r, then type cmd in the box and press enter) type diskpart in the black window type list disk type select disk 1\2\3 change the no. according to the list of devices type attributes disk set readonly voila!


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Open CMD with administrator privileges then go to DISKPART and select the disk then type in ATTRIBUTES DISK, and Diskpart will tell you what you want to know about your flash drive. Most important is the first line Current Read-only State: Yes. This lets us know that, indeed, the flash drive is write protected. To remove the write protection with Diskpart, ...


0

Try following: Open "Computer Management" "Storage" -> "Disk Management" Make sure to find the correct device on the bottom panel Right click on the partition rectange -> "Delete Volume" Right click on the appeared grey area -> "Create Volume" edit: If that doesn't work, you might need to use DISKPART utility to recreate filesystem and main partition, ...


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Make sure you are running the Administrator account Right click the file or folder that is write protected Click Properties Click Security Tab Click Advanced Click Owner Tab Click Edit... Select yourself as the owner then click apply If it allowed you to take ownership you should now be able to delete the files


3

No it is not true. The transmission speed of a usb flash drive depends on usb version. There are USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 USB 3.0 transfer speed at maximum of 640 Megabytes per second while USB 2.0 can handle up to 60 Size/capacity does not show how fast a USB is


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According to David (see comments) this isn't the case and I'm indeed wrong (USB hubs can and have to pass larger packets), I can't delete the answer while it's accepted. While not 100% sure I think it's the fault of the USB hub. Ignore the connected drive itself and look at the stats of the hub (i.e. not indented lines): bMaxPacketSize0: 0x08 (8) ...


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Could you confirm that this is a WD Elements? What's the device's model number? As the guys suggested, the drive may not be getting enough power through the hub and thus limiting its performance. Do you have other drives or USB hubs to try different combinations to see if the problem persists? If you are doubting the drive's health you could run WD Data ...


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I noticed heating, when the heat is high, it always performs slow..


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When creating bootable installation media using most tools, all data on the pen drive will usually be deleted. In theory it should be possible to just add the installation files and make it bootable without deleting anything, but that's more complicated than using any of the available ready to use wizards, like the Windows Media Creation Tool. If you use one ...



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