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I use YUMI from pen drive linux. It makes it very easy, and does not require installation. I am typing this from a computer that is booted off a flash drive with ubuntu and windows 7.


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Ubuntu's website details how to do this with Pendrive Linux's Universal USB installer. You can find that here: http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/create-a-usb-stick-on-windows For a more portable version, I might recommend using 32-bit Ubuntu for usage with 32-bit CPUs.


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I think everybody has gotten it right in some way, but I think there still are bits of information I'd like to add: Regarding the filesystem Live media is not the same as a properly installed operating system, and sure you'll need a variant of the ext filesystem for installing your Linux distribution but on your hard drive, many live media does not have ...


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You don't need to use external partition software. I had the same exact issue and for the same exact reason: Start command prompt Type diskpart In the new window: type list disk type select disk x (replace x with your disk number as determined by the previous command) type clean type create partition primary You can now go to disk management and ...


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You can create a usb bootable drive using command line as well : Open a command prompt Type in the following commands : diskpart list disk select disk 1 (select usb disk id here.) clean create partition primary select partition 1 active format fs=ntfs assign exit Insert Windows 7 CD Type the following command : E: (where E: is your DVD drive letter) cd ...


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I downloaded the file again and it worked. I think the best solution to prevent this would be to check the Hash of the downloaded file before using it. Thanks for all the help provided.


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Found a workaround. Installed Windows using a DVD I burned ISO into (first time in no less than 5 years!).


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Copy all your files from you computer's main music file and sync them to the usb drive Before you sync them - rearrange them the way you wish them played It worked for me


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I have a laptop Sony Vaio VGN FE31H which has windows installed and I wanted to boot a linux distribution from USB stick. Unfortunately the BIOS has no such option... I am looking for a suitable boot loader which will give me an option to boot from USB. Is this the right way to go about it? Convert the USB stick to a bootable ISO DVD. See, for example, ...


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I had the same problem, inspired of the answer from user258400 i used directly: fsck.fat -r /dev/sde1 instead of: fsck -r /dev/sde1 which did the trick


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Did you properly inserted the USB cable? Sometimes it is connected sort of "half way" and newer 3.0 pins are not properly linked.


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First of all, I'm not a Mac user, so I'm doing this purely from a Unix perspective. First of all, you need to convert the ISO file to a disk writable IMG file. hdiutil convert -format UDRW -o ~/path/to/target.img ~/path/to/windows.iso Then we need to unmount the USB-stick to write an image to it. To do this we need to know the device address, which can be ...


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Several possible issues. you were sold a low-quality or fake (additional question: other machines - was it recognized as 3.0?). I see that you said it worked previously, but this is no indication of good drive it doesn't slide into the port completely, thus not making full connection. I actually think it is the problem, since you say it works on other ...


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There is no official application from Microsoft to create a bootable Windows XP USB flash drive installer, so I would burn a CD from the ISO file, and install from CD. If you do not have a CD drive on the PC, an external CD/DVD drive would work OK. Make a bootable XP install disc from ISO on your Win7 OS by using Windows Explorer: Place a blank ...


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No there is no specific driver that you can use to solve this. It sounds like a connection problem. The other possibility is that the pen drive is broken. Have you tried it in other machines? Are you certain that it is okay?


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I would say they are called flash drives. This could be biased based on my locale, but it also makes sense. They are data drives, just like HDDs but contain flash memory chips rather than reading the drive optically like a CD. This is where they get their speed and versatility. Thumb drive is just a term that came from the small, compact size of the drives. ...


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Follow these steps (with root permissions in command line): touch /etc/rc.local chmod +x /etc/rc.local nano /etc/rc.local #or any other editor you want Add #!/bin/bash to the top of the file. Add mount -a the the next line of the file Add exit 0 to the next line of the file. Now the file (/etc/rc.local) should look like this (you can add comments for ...


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Probably you have flashed some boot USB or ISO image which have size of only 49MB. Open diskmgmt.msc and check if there is only 1 49MB partition, delete it and recreate the partition. Or use some partitioning tools like EaseUS Partition Master or MiniTool Partition Wizard to extend/recreate the partition


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Did you try using a different computer to see if that solves the problem? Usually, flash drives are detected based on the amount of available space that can be used for reading/writing to the disk. You could try a full format once (not quick format), and then try formatting again to see if more space is available. Flash drive is the most generally accepted ...


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Windows doesn't support multiple partitions on flash drives correctly. Here's a screenshot of a partitioned flash drive shown in Disk Management window: Note that both partitions appear to have no drive letters assigned. Actually the first partition has a letter which is nowhere to be found in Disk Management (1): In your case the first partition is an ...


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Size of a Block A 3-dimensional track (the same track on all disks) is called a cylinder. Each track is divided into 63 sectors. Each sector contains 512 bytes of data. Therefore the block size in the partition table is 64 heads * 63 sectors * 512 bytes er... divided by 1024... :-) Source: Partitioning with fdisk Any time Linux refers to ...


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Results may vary based on factors like which Microwave you use. Anything electronic or metal should not go in microwaves. I still remember the day that I put a fork in a microwave as a child. From then on, the microwave would emit little spark arcs... like little lightning bolts. It was permanently damaged. I've since read that with at least some ...


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Ok, I know this answer is late, but I've not seen it anywhere else and it worked for me: I wanted to return under warranty. I wanted my files erased / unreadable and the card visibly undamaged. I took a 9V battery and two wires. I put a wire from each terminal of the battery to a contact on the card, trying out different contact combinations. The card ...


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I don't own any high-speed thumb drives, but my experience with standard-speed thumb drives is that they are slow to operate from. They're great in a pinch, but I wouldn't want to use that as my regular way to work. Definitely get the fastest thumb drive you can if you plan to use a "regular" Linux distro. Another approach, which minimizes the speed ...


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One solution that has worked very well for me is to use a LiveUSB of Linux Mint (2-4Gb is plenty to write that bootable image onto), and then use another stick (plugged after the LiveUSB finishes booting) as storage for persistent files. If the second stick is FAT32, then it will be sufficiently cross-platform that you can use it from the school's computers ...


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If you want to run Linux from a usb drive with good performance, then it should be a USB 3 one. Also high capacity drives are generally slower. If you do not need to run lots of apps, then you should stick with 8 or 16 GB. Also you should chose EXT4 as a file system as it is the default now.


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I install all my *nix servers with a USB key. Have a look at YUMI and have fun ! YUMI (Your Universal Multiboot Integrator) can be used to create a Multiboot USB Flash Drive containing multiple operating systems, antivirus utilities, disc cloning, diagnostic tools, and more. YUMI uses syslinux to boot extracted distributions stored on the USB device, and ...


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I'm assuming you're on a UNIX system, because you can use dd, so, if you are on Linux, the command should be: dd if=kali.iso of=/dev/sdb1 bs=512k For Mac: dd if=kali.iso of=/dev/sdb1 bs=1m You may have a corrupted flash drive from the block size not being right. Another note, you have to make sure that your flash drive is BIOS and not an EFI boot. If you ...


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I tried the GNUPGHOME directory and it mostly works but if you ever have another installation of GPG all hell breaks loose and it will create some problems. A better solution I happened upon is to download and install the full gpg4win download, then run mkportable --full [somedir] to create a portable install. Copy that to your USB or truecrypt drive and ...


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You could try getting the one time boot menu to come up (I think that's what they call it in windows). Then select your flash drive from the menu. You pull up the menu by holding down either F12, F2, F9, Esc (escape) or even the delete button on some systems. It all depends on the manufacturer. Make sure that both your flash drive and your hardware are the ...


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Ok i found the issue. OS X get info wasn't showing the true size. Only 1 program did however, called DiskDaisy. Re-zipped all of my unzipped files/folders on the drive and I was back to the 22GB of used space.


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If you like to use terminal, use the command: sudo dd if=your_iso_here of=your_drive_here bs=512k. That will make a live win7 usb.


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Depending on your manufacturer you could hold down F2, F12, Esc (escape), or F9. Those are the ones I know (again, depending on the manufacturer) will bring up a boot menu of bootable drives. You may have done something wrong, and the drive isn't bootable so the computer id skipping it, if that is the case.


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I had exactly the same issue and the Mario's solution did not fixed my problem. Additionally to Mario's solution do the following: after 'clean' do not leave diskpart using 'exit' type 'create partition primary' This will create primary FAT32 partition (which was not possible from the Disk Manager as described in comment of 'Stanislav Mamontov' to ...



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