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109

A mouse is a slow device (the old PS/2 standard was RS232C-based), so USB1 is more than adequate. USB3 ports have extra connectors for the high-speed transfers, but also have standard USB2 connectors for backwards compatibility. Unless your mouse has these connectors (and I cannot imagine that any mouse has) it will connect via USB2 in a USB3 connector. ...


90

It's possible for it to be good. I have micro size USB flash drives where everything is inside the silver connector portion. The ribbon would only be for the LED.


55

No, this won't work. All data you are copying will need to be read by the computer from the source drive, before they are copied to the target drive. If anything, having two hard drives connected to the same USB hub might slow things down. If you have multiple devices connected to the hub, they have to share the bandwidth.


46

Yes, see USB protocols As I understand it, the USB spec defines a complex set of layered protocols and device profiles. For example, USB devices can conform to high-level templates like mass-storage, keyboard (or Human Interface Device, etc) and be managed by a generic device driver. Some USB devices can communicate at a lower level such that the OS low ...


30

Just because data rate of a mouse is very low and can be handled by USB 1.x does not mean it can't benefit from being plugging into a faster controller. There are a number of factors in play here: USB 3.0 controllers support backward compatibility by performing enumeration in a way that is compatible with USB 1.x and 2.0 devices, and exposing a logical ...


29

No. A wireless mouse/keyboard does not use regular WiFi (i.e. 802.11x) and can only bind with the receiver it came with. (An exception may be the Logitech Unifying receiver, which allows connecting every Logitech device that supports it, to a single receiver - but still, it will take one USB port.) If you do not want to use a receiver, consider using a ...


28

Question: Is there a low-level USB communication protocol in action and what is it? Answer: Yes there is, the USB specification includes the USB protocol which defines the way the bus is used on a bit level. This would be the 'low-level' protocol that underlies the higher level protocols i.e. mass-storage, HID, etc. For specifics on how the USB protocol ...


25

[First Question] "Does a USB Monitor require a VGA Card?" In response to your first question, no a VGA card[1] is not required to display to a USB monitor. However, a USB card or port is required in order to display to a USB monitor. "This 16-inch portable LED monitor is a must-have laptop accessory and receives both power and signal via a single ...


24

This is what it actually looks like. We managed to get a hold of another USB stick (same type, same brand - owned by somebody else). Opened it up and it looked the exact same as the one shown in the pictures above.


18

We need to take a look at the mouse's polling rate and from that we can have a better idea of how much data is being transmitted. If a mouse has a 100hz polling rate, it is sending data to the computer 100 times a second. A standard mouse will send a 3 byte packet containing info on X/Y position information as well as button information. Considering that 3 ...


14

No you cannot - short direct answer. More of the technicality of why it cannot - Most wireless keyboards / mice use 2.4 GHz radio frequency for all their wireless communication. Though Wifi technically uses the same 2.4 GHz frequency but the signals confirm to one of the set IEEE standards such as 802.11b/g/n. So, while the wireless trans-receiver can ...


14

USB are a host-driven protocol, not a peer-to-peer standard like firewire. Drives are just devices, they're not host to control or decide anything. Without the host they cannot even interact with the outside world. Assuming that you can connect the two drives like that, how can they know which files/folders you want to copy? Will they copy from which drive ...


14

USB devices start out as "low powered" (drawing a maximum of one unit load of power, which is 100 mA in USB 2.0, see 7.2.1 Classes of Devices, page 171), and can negotiate "high power" mode in which the device can draw up to 500 mA in plain USB 2.0. At USB's 5 V DC, 500 mA provides 2.5 W of power, plus or minus tolerances. The operative word here is ...


13

To check whether the USB device itself is USB 2.0 or 3.0, use USB Device Tree Viewer (on a computer). Then disconnect all your USB devices on the computer, and reconnect the USB in question. You'll see it appear on the sidebar on the left. Click it. On the right, scroll down about 1/4 of the page. In the section 'Connection Information', look at the Device ...


13

Well the pictures aren't 100% clear but it could be that all the electronics fit inside the USB plug. If the drive works ok in your computer this is the case. If you are adventurous you could try to open the metal casing of the USB plug. Warning this could destroy your drive (so backup data first).


13

Like nearly every other type of communication interface, USB is implemented as a protocol stack. The levels within this stack that are common to all or multiple types of devices are defined by the USB standards themselves, which both enables compatibility and prevents each device from doing redundant protocol design. Furthermore, each layer of the protocol ...


12

I've made a similar case mod few years ago. You can start with a USB bracket like this one: Note that it's simply a cable screwed to a bracket. Get one with port distance similar to this on original board. You may need to file the case a little bit so that ports aren't covered with plastic. Then simply unscrew the cable, glue it to the case and connect ...


12

A hub is just a way to share a connection to the computer when you don't have enough USB ports for all the devices you want to connect. Devices connected to the computer through a hub never talk to each other; the hub ensures that traffic between the computer and the connected devices goes to and from the right device as if each was connected to a USB port ...


11

Does a portable USB monitor require a VGA Card? No. The USB monitor does not require any other video hardware resources. Some may take advantage of GPUs available, but they do not require them. If I buy a PC without any GPU capability (processor without integrated GPU + motherboard without D-Sub/DVI/HDMI ports and without any discrete graphics ...


10

You can use Mac's Image Capture after setting your Nexus 5 USB connection to Camera Mode. To do it do the following: Swipe your screen from top to bottom. click on the little avatar icon on the top right. Click Settings. Go to Device > Storage Click on the Options icon (the 3 dots, on the very top right). Choose USB connection and change it to Camera ...


10

Shutdown command on Start screen in Windows 8 does not perform the "real" shutdown: It logs off the current user, closing all the running applications, and then It puts your computer into hibernate mode. It's called Hybrid Shutdown. It is done for quicker startup time: the system does not need to perform full boot process. When you use shutdown command, ...


10

This doesn’t make sense to me. Is there any reason for this? I noticed this as well when I upgraded my Mac Mini to a model with USB 3.0 ports on it; my older USB 2.0 drives would copy data noticeably faster. The logic I believe is not all USB 2.0 controllers are the same. The way I understand it, USB 2.0 speed is spec’ed to be a max speed; not a ...


10

You formatted it as FAT32 which will show as upper case in Windows Explorer. Format it as NTFS or ExFAT & it will show in Windows as mixed case. ExFat is more portable - most computers can read & write to it, natively [Mac & Windows, unix may need additional drivers]. NTFS is native to Windows, though other OSes may be able to read & ...


9

The second port is for additional power. Some PCs can't provide enough power on a single port. If your drive works on your PC with one port, you're okay. No difference in transmission speed or performance.


9

Why not check yourself? Many computer motherboards are able to tell you the power consumption of a usb port via the control panel. Go into the control panel, system > device manager and find the USB port or hub in question in the list. You'll then see power consumption figures like this:


9

Go to Control Panel > Hardware and Sound > Devices and Printers Right click on your USB Keyboard, go to Properties, then the Hardware tab. Highlight USB Input Device (this is the part that doesn't show up under Device Manager) and click on Properties. Click on Change settings. Go to the Power Management tab and uncheck 'Allow the computer to turn off this ...


8

Answers to questions like this depend on the so-called "attack model" that you want to be protected from. In other words, will the user actively try to overcome your protection? Or is the protection there just to warn the user, which you trust to be honest with respect to the read-only setting and not try to overcome it? In the second case, setting the ...


8

There are actually a set of related communication protocols which interact. At the lowest level, there is a protocol which describes how packets of bytes are sent over a serial connection. This is common for all USB devices (but different between USB2 and USB3). One of the first packets sent asks the device to describe itself. To prevent a chicken-and-egg ...


8

One would actually have to check both halves of the caseing, but just from looking at the picture this half of the case does not appear to be designed to hold more than it currently does. As such it at least appears unlikely that something has been taken out. If the person had their work on it it is probably a real USB.



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