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That DVI splitter is meant to connect one output to two different monitors. If you try to use it the other way and hook up two outputs (computers) to it, the will interfere and potentially cause damage to the graphics cards (depending on the output impedance, two different signals put to the same pin can cause high current flow). If you make sure to only ...


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All LCD monitors have a white light source behind the panel. You can use this. Forget about delivering a display signal and just figure out what kind of power you need to get just the backlight working. Tear out all electronics and replace it with a simple power supply that is only connected to that backlight. Done :-) yeah I know it's a bit late to ...


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All you need is a Display Link USB connection for every monitor more than two. If you use your laptop and one monitor, you can add a Display Link for each monitor. I know of some people with up to 5 monitors who keep their laptops closed on the docking station. ...


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You could use DVI to VGA adapters but a better option might be the Radeon HD 5570 1GB VHDCI QUAD VGA, which supports 7680 x 1080 (2x2 VGA) in Eyefinity mode. Single slot, Quad Monitor support is now available for your Small Form Factor Windows Vista, Windows 7 PC. Run up to 4 monitors simultaneously using ATI eyefinity mode. Full support for ...


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HDMI and DVI are actually exactly the same digital signal output, just names for the different type of connector. You're not really converting the signal but rather the adapter. VGA is an analog output. As long as you use the HDMI/DVI ports from your PC to your monitor you'll have the best signal possible. Avoid VGA since that's analog and not ideal for your ...


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First of all IOMMU is not VT-X or AMD-V or EPT for that matter which are CPU virtualisation extensions and MMU technology but using CPU. For advanced DMA devices such as graphics card your motherboard and CPU must have IOMMU support - a peace of hardware that manages translation from host to guest os. You will find this technology in Intel and AMD server ...


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Old question but it is technically possible. Something like the AMD W9000 firepro can drive 6 displays simultaneously. If you put 4 of those into a dual CPU motherboard with 4 x PCIe 16X slots it should and give you 24 independent displays. I do believe it has been tried before.


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What you descibe sounds most like the adapter is doing the best it can for what it is. There are "sync" settings in (only) some VGA monitors that could compensate completly for a sloppy conversion. The digital to analog converters and VGA monitors can also generally run best at specific resolutions, or aspect ratios. As you discovered they can still ...


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Could be the automatic overscan compensation. Unfortunately I don't have a Windows notebook anymore, so I can't tell you where exactly to find the setting. It's in the Intel Graphics Control Panel. Of course, this all applies only if you're actually able to set the correct resolution in Windows.


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VGA is compatible with DVI. That was part of the design of DVI, after all. You should avoid using the VGA port if at all possible because it's analog and lossy. You'll likely notice ghosting and other artifacts. HDMI may be compatible with DVI, depending on your hardware. For example, AMD graphics cards ship with DVI-to-HDMI adapters. This only works ...


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Yes, you can use any adapter cable between HDMI to DVI. Then you use a cable to connect the display to the adapter cable. To connect a DVI monitor to a VGA port on a laptop you will need a VGA-DVI converter. For more information about how to connect a DVI monitor to a VGA port on a laptop look at this question: How can I connect a DVI monitor to the VGA ...


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As Dallas said, you can connect your monitor to DisplayPort with the help of a DP-HDMI adapter. Be sure to get a good-quality one (and supporting DP 1.2) since otherwise you wouldn't be able to get high resolution and long cable distance support. Some advantages are listed here : ...


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HDMI is generally designed to work with standard TV resolution : 720×480, 720×576, 1280×720, 1920×1080. VGA (640×480) should also be supported everywhere. Even though there should not be any problem with using other resolutions, your VGA-HDMI (which is an active digital to analog converted, therefore it has his own chipset and firmware with hardcoded values) ...


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You buy a display port to HDMI adapter, and then connect to the monitor using HDMI cable. I believe the best resolution VGA will give you is 720p, and with HDMI through display port you get full HD resolution (1080p).


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There is no penalty to convert from DVI on your video card to HDMI on your monitor; The DVI ports on your graphics card simultaneously output a DVI-D, DVI-A, HDMI, and VGA signal over each DVI port. The DVI -> HDMI and DVI -> VGA "adapters" you find are really just selecting which signal to use. Note, this is true only for the DVI ports you find on ...



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