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AVI is a container that has video and/or audio tracks. FLV compresses both. You may find it easier to use Avidemux to convert (open) the AVI and then save as an MP4. Close Avidemux and open the MP4 you just saved and try finding the codec details (media info) of the source file in a video player. Here are some examples of how to open-convert-save. Windows XP ...


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TL;DR: I would use this for high quality and slow one-pass encoding: avconv -threads 8 -i bbb_sunflower_native_60fps_normal.mp4 \ -c:a aac -strict experimental -c:v h264 -crf 16 -preset veryslow \ -filter:v scale=1600:900 -aspect 16:9 -b:a 192k -ac 48 -vol 256 output.mp4 First of all, to get any output at all: Change -f null to -f mp4 or -f matroska, ...


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This works very well for me. Below is code to convert all .mkv to .mp4 files in windows. You may need to add ffmpeg to your path. you can just put the full path to the ffmpeg executable, D:\apps\ffmpeg\bin\ffmpeg.exe Download ffmpeg for windows here. Usage: Drop a .mkv file onto it. It will do the whole directory. Save in a file called convert.bat. for ...


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I had this problem too. I think it's because the static build I've got for windows doesn't include the fontconfig files. I copied a default fonts.conf file from this discussion on Zeranoe FFmpeg into my a folder called "conf" that I put in my ffmpeg folder and I set the environmental variables thusly: FC_CONFIG_DIR=C:\Program Files\ffmpeg\conf ...


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The answer was not to use ffmpeg at all. It turns out that H264/AVC streams support concatination, and so simply taking two seperate streams at different resolutions and using cat works perfectly. So, with two streams at different resolutions... cat stream_a.h264 stream_b.h264 >> stream_c.h264 Then wrap it up in whatever container you'd like.


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Probably should add the way to do that with avconv as well: avconv -i input.avi -c:v copy -c:a copy output.mp4 If you are compiling libav from source to do that, you need to make sure that you have enabled mp4 muxer. You can do that with ./configure [your other options] --enable-muxer=mp4 It normally is enabled by default anyhow, but i'm providing it ...


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Based on some trial and error, it seems that it works when you first convert the existing input to some other intermediate file, and then overlay them. For example, you could use HuffYUV, high quality H.264, lossless H.264, ProRes, etc.: ffmpeg -i input.mkv -c:v huffyuv -c:a pcm_s16le output.avi ffmpeg -i input.mkv -c:v libx264 -crf 16 -c:a aac -strict ...


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I would immediately say if file-size doesn't really matter then just experiment with increasing the bit-rate. For the silent audio you may just want to use ffmpeg, I do not know enough about Audacity to give any sort of comment. I have used this before. ffmpeg.exe -f lavfi -i aevalsrc=0:0::duration=YOUR_DESIRED_DURATION -ab 10k YourAudioName.aac This ...


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The problem is that the default bitrate for the MPEG-2 is rather low (as with most other video encoders in ffmpeg, the H.264 one being an exception). MPEG-2 is also not the best choice as a codec these days. Better quality for MPEG-2 You have a few options if you want to stick with MPEG-2: Increase the bitrate. You're now using -b:v 2500k. If it's HD ...



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