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There is not an easy way to do this as it all revolves around time codes (in and out) if you have the exact timecode point of the points you need to start and stop from you could type them in to the NLE for IN and OUT then cut but I dont think there is a auto way of doing this but I might be wrong


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As @Daniel B pointed out, M3U is a playlist format. It is a very small file that contains links to the actual media. M3U8 is the Unicode version of it, which means that it supports links with letters and symbols from any language. Since it is a plain text file, you can open it with Notepad or other simple text editor and try to copy the links from it, and ...


0

I haven't been able to do it in Handbrake (Kev's answer suggests it's possible with batch conversion but that doesn't work for me) but ffmpeg supports it using its concatenate feature. Concatenate multiple input files and encode the video stream with x264 and copy the audio stream to a single MP4 output file: ffmpeg -f concat -i files.txt -c:v libx264 -crf ...


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I'm looking for a command to move the video's atom to the beginning so the video will start very quickly You're already doing that by setting -movflags +faststart. So you're fine. The video has an average bitrate of about 1 MBit/s, which is okay, but probably a little too much for 360p video. For me, your video takes rougly 4–5 seconds to start, on ...


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The index variable for FOR loops is case sensitive.  You need to change %%~nA to %%~na (or capitalize the other occurrences).


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Meh, I don't know how to answer this without recommending an actual product. But ok here we go. Generally speaking these cheap little video converters all use one of a few known chipsets and they've been around for years so Linux support is generally very good. Also good news is that, with these basic converters, the video steam is exposed as /dev/video0, ...


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I don't think HandbrakeCLI allows to copy the video stream. The documentation only mentions an option to copy audio. So your command would re-encode the video and audio at the same time, which explains why it takes so long to complete. You could of course use another tool. With ffmpeg, changing the audio to MP3 or AAC, while keeping the video stream intact, ...


0

Several problems here: You are using an old version of avconv from the Ubuntu 12.04 repos. This version does not have an H.264 encoder (libx264) compiled into it. That's why it chooses MPEG-4 Part II video instead, using the mpeg4 encoder. While it still uses the same .MP4 container, MPEG-4 Part II is not as efficient as H.264. Your command uses -q:v 10, ...


-2

Try ffmpeg -i input.webm -sameq out.mp4 As alternatives, you can try FFMC: http://www.noobslab.com/2013/04/latest-ff-multi-converter-for-ubuntu.html or pre-compiled Miro: http://www.getmiro.com/download/for-ubuntu/


0

After some more research, I found out this previous post. So for generating *.mp4 file, the trick is to use: $ avconv -i input.avi -c:v libx264 -crf 22 -c:a libfaac -movflags faststart output.mp4 However -movflags faststart make sense only in the case of mp4 generation. Looking at man avconv from a debian/jessie system, I was able to find the suggested ...



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