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32

Use this to cut video from [start] for [duration]. Make sure you download a recent version of ffmpeg, and don't use the one that comes with your distribution (e.g. Ubuntu). ffmpeg -i in.mp4 -ss [start] -t [duration] -c:v copy -c:a copy out.mp4 Here, the options mean the following: -ss specifies the start time, e.g. 00:01:23.000 or 83 (in seconds) -t ...


26

I can get a greenscreen effect with Adobe Visual Communicator 3 most reliably -- it has pro level chroma keying that actually works, unlike the other toy software out there. I tried 3 or 4, none of them even really worked. However, I cannot figure out any way to pipe this excellent greenscreen in real time through Skype. The ManyCam suggested by ...


20

On Windows, VirtualDub should be able to do this. Check out this guide for in-depth guide on how to split videos. The creatively named Easy Video Splitter can apparently do the job easier, but I have never used it so i would not know first hand.


14

You can try using something such as ffmpeg or mencoder to reencode it with a lower bitrate, e.g.: Calculate the bitrate you need by dividing 1 GB by the video length in seconds. So, for a video of length 16:40 (1000 seconds), use a bitrate of 1000000 bytes/sec: ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -b 1000000 output.mp4 Additional options that might be worth considering ...


14

I just learned that the timecode_frame_start does not work like this. The only way to start at specific frames is to convert a number of frames to ss.ms syntax, or hh:mm:ss.ms. So, if your video is at 25 fps, and you want to start at 133 frames, you would need 133 / 25 = 5.32 So, run ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -ss 5.32 -c:v libx264 -c:a libfaac out.mp4 ...


11

If you're not afraid of the command line ffmpeg is the tool to use. It's a bit complicated, but most free tools are based on ffmpeg because it's the most powerful one out there. This is a sample of a command to split out 30 seconds of a video. ffmpeg -i input.avi -vcodec copy -ss 00:00:10:15 -t 00:00:30:00 output.avi If you're on windows, it's a little ...


10

mpg files are the easiest to join. you can actually copy them together. in windows you use copy/b file1.mpg+file2.mpg+file3.mpg newfile.mpg in linux, I use cat cat file1.mpg file2.mpg file3.mpg >> newfile.mpg


10

Try mencoder or ffmpeg, both free, both good. Mencoder mencoder -oac copy -ovc copy -o output.avi input1.avi input2.avi FFmpeg From the FFmpeg Wiki article on how to concatenate (join, merge) media files: Create a file "mylist.txt" with all the files you want to have concatenated in the following form ( Lines starting with a dash are ignored ) : # ...


10

Yes, there is, try use the app called "melt", more info: http://mltframework.org/twiki/bin/view/MLT/MltMelt If you uses a debian derived distro: apt-get install melt


9

Ok, since I cannot find much about melt command line usage, here are some notes.. To begin with - there is a Ubuntu/Debian package for melt (I have Ubuntu 11.04 with MLT melt 0.6.2); the link given by @Ielton is for the "Media Lovin' Toolkit" (MLT) Wiki, which melt is a part of (but also openshot and kdenlive). Here is the link to the documentation text ...


9

It isn't very well documented, but FFmpeg has a -vol switch which will allow you to increase volume output. Example: ffmpeg -i vid.mkv -vol 512 -vcodec copy output.mkv Some things to take note of: the -vol switch uses "byte percent", so you can't just specify a 200% volume increase, 100% = 256 so specifying 256 would leave the volume as is, 512 would ...


9

On Windows, you can use VirtualDub. On Linux, there is a very similar program called AviDemux2


8

This is a standard feature on the PhotoBooth application in OSX Leopard your using a Mac. You can create your own static color background and then record the video or change it on the fly. I am not sure of Windows application thought. I never use a Webcam in Windows.


7

Without a doubt, VirtualDub is the way to go. Open the first AVi in VirtualDub Select "Direct Stream Copy" for both video and audio In the file menu, choose Append AVI Segment (or similarly named) File -> Save As and give your avi a new name Bingo! I have done this many times. The only gotcha is to be aware that the dimensions, codecs, bitrates, etc. all ...


7

The tool for the job is mpgtx (if not installed try, e.g., sudo apt-get install mpgtx). Let's suppose your file is called input.mpg and you want to create output.mpg Here are some common tasks Select segments from a mpeg movie, create a new mpeg movie out of them //Grabs seconds 10-20, 42 through 52, then 1:23 through 1:33 and make a new mpeg movie ...


7

The merging behavior you describe is called Picture in Picture (PiP), or more specifically it's called Picture and Picture (PaP, P&P), commonly referred to as Picture by Picture (PbP). For Linux, you could try use Cinelerra to create PIP videos. For Windows, you are going to face a lot of trials/shareware so your best bet is professional software. For ...


7

You can accurately cut videos with FFmpeg. Note that the order of input options is important. This would for example cut 5 seconds, starting from 5 minutes, 3 seconds and 123 milliseconds. ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -ss 00:05:03.123 -t 5 -c:v libx264 -c:a libfaac out.mp4 Read the input options from left to right: First the input will be decoded, then it will ...


7

A free, cross-platform solution with FFmpeg, which does bitstream copy and therefore doesn't take more than a few seconds, even for large files: ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -i subtitles.srt -c:s mov_text -c:v copy -c:a copy output.mp4 This works for MP4. Be aware that some subtitle formats might not automatically be compatible with the chosen output formats, so ...


6

Yes there is. To bring up the tool that is built into Expression, go to Window and click on "Summary" to check it. You can also estimate it yourself using one of the formulae you can read about here: http://forum.videohelp.com/threads/299571-How-to-calculate-size-of-video-file-after-encoding


6

Ogg Video Tools seems to do what you are looking for. Short description: Sometimes it would be nice to concatenate (join) two or more video files. For that you can use oggCat, which creates a continuous Ogg video file from the given files. # oggCat newFile.ogv file1.ogv file2.ogv [ file3.ogv [...] ] Note: The video files must correspond in ...


6

First, create a separate user account for your brother. Now set a password on your own user account. Then, whenever you leave your computer, click Start then Switch User. Leave the computer at the login screen. Your brother can log in and use the computer but he cannot access your running programs.


6

I've seen lots of people recommending Deshaker Its a plugin for the FOSS (free in more ways than price) program VirtualDub. It was used to create the example on WikiPedia's article on digital video stabilisation


6

You need Windows Movie Maker, it's free, made by Microsoft for Windows, is made to serve "dummies" and does everything you need. If you have Windows XP, it should already be installed in your computer, look for it in: Start > Programs > Accessories. If wou've got Windows 7 or Windows Vista, it comes with the Windows Live suite. You can download it ...


5

FFmpeg will do this for you. Your command might look something like this: Code: ffmpeg -i input.mpg -ss 00:00:10 -t 00:00:30 out1.mpg -ss is the start point in hh:mm:ss from the beginning of your video file -t is the length of time in hh:mm:ss of your new segment. So, in the above example, you're starting 10 seconds in from the beginning of the original ...


5

What OS? On linux, you can use mencoder: mencoder -oac copy -ovc copy -o output.avi input1.avi input2.avi


5

You can non-destructively edit the file to clip out portions you don't want (take 1m off the beginning, 30s off the middle, 4m off the end). Other than that, you're going to have to re-encode the mp4 as a smaller file. Try Handbrake. Decrease the resolution from the Mino's native 1280x720 to something smaller, just preserve the aspect ratio. Decrease the ...


5

This can be done in ffmpeg. Before you begin, read this great resource on understanding the math: http://www.doom9.org/index.html?/aspectratios.htm First, calculate the top and bottom padding values. long=width of original, skinny=height of orginal totalPadding = .75*long - skinny top padding = bottom padding = totalPadding / 2 NOTE: if the top and ...


5

Newer versions of ffmpeg deprecate the "padtop" and "padbottom" options. To do it with the new version, use the same basic logic above. In my case, my original video was 720x404, but I wanted to encode 720x480 - padding the top and bottom. So per-above: (480-404) / 2 = 38 i.e. Pad 38 pixels to both the top and bottom. The "pad" command wants the size of ...


5

Do you really not want to compile yourself? It's pretty easy. Follow the guides here to install the latest version of FFmpeg. It takes a few minutes. You can also download a static build from their download page, which you just have to extract and you're ready to go. I'd really advise you to go for the latest, as the versions shipped with Ubuntu (Mint) are ...


5

This is for FFmpeg (see here for Windows versions). First, prepare your images so they are named image-001.jpg, image-002.jpg, et cetera. Put them into one folder. Now, use the following command: ffmpeg -y -loop 1 -f image2 -r 0.5 -i image-%03d.jpg -s:v 1280x720 -b:v 1M \ -i soundtrack.mp3 -t 01:05:00 -map 0:0 -map 1:0 out.avi You can of course ...



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