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5

You are being held hostage by a TeslaCrypt based Ransomware, it has encrypted your files and now they want money to give you the unlock key. No way to un-encrypt your files yourself, either pay them, restore your files from a safe backup or lose your files forever. I would clean reinstall the Operating System after you pay ransom and un-encrypt or Before ...


3

Short answer - it is possible, but highly unlikely. As far as viruses go, it's still kind of conspiracy that bios malware especially UEFI is in the wild, actually it's the other way around HDD protected area is used for malware via vendor specific ATA commands, but that is still something that is not very much used in the wild and you can find such ...


3

This is a very nasty virus category, known as Ransomware. There is further information on it here. The bad news is that the encryption used is realistically uncrackable. If you don't have backups, there is not a lot you can really do. The virus will demand payment to decrypt your files, which, lets face it, they may not do and may just take the money and ...


3

If you have backups, your best option is to wipe your computer, restore from backup, and start over. Otherwise, if you are very very lucky, you may have been infected with ransomware from incompetent developers who made mistakes allowing you to recover your files or find the key somewhere. Or, you may be infected with ransomware that has been "hacked back" ...


2

If a virus is on your computer at the time any program handles sensitive data, you're hosed. KeePass does as much as it can to protect your passwords from malware, but no solution can be bulletproof; once malware is running on your computer, the machine cannot be trusted. Let's look at some of the security features: Database encryption. Without your ...


2

Yes. Take these to facts together: 1) Windows security updates often state that they are fixing a vulnerability that could allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code on your computer. 2) One can write a program that reads all files on your computer and sends them over the Internet. This is not necessarily malware - it could be just a backup program. Now, ...


1

This is clearly a scam! I am not concerned that the virus warning of that site has some base. The only thing I'd be concerned is if I mistakenly agreed/downloaded something while on that site. For a second opinion run the Malwarebytes program. (and BTW running two real time anti-virus software - you said you have AVG and Microsoft Security Essentials - is ...


1

Delete it unless you think it is something new and unique that an anti-virus company might be interested in (chances are it is not). I would not delete a quarantined file if it is a program you use all of the time that has been flagged incorrectly by anti-virus software. It is rare but it has happened. In that case you would want to wait until the ...


1

Meanwhile the choice to delete or not to delete the files in quarantine is a doubt for Hamlet and can be considered opinion based; really it depends from many factors as the space availability, which kind of file they are, the reason of quarantine, the action of the virus (if it overwrites the file or shifts the data), the possibility to find a copy not ...


1

I found this post to be useful. In short: rename the registry key for the process ID so that the DLL launch fails. You have to become the owner of the key and give yourself full control for the rename to succeed.


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Danger! The existing answers make it sound as if disabling autorun.inf makes it perfectly safe to insert untrusted flash drives. That is false. First up, once an attacker can run code on your machine, it isn't your machine anymore, and anything could happen. One possibility (if you're running as administrator, or if the virus leverages an ...



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