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If you have a virus, format the machine totally. If the image you're restoring from doesn't have the virus it's fine to proceed. If another hard drive may be infected, you need to do the same thing - nuke it and restore from back ups. If the virus is on the network then you still essentially do the same thing. Disconnect network, nuke everything and ...


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The link you provided looks like a typical email click tracking redirect link. The site that the url first goes to tracks the hit then redirects to the correct url. This can be verified by using a redirect checking tool such as Redirect Checker. In your case, there is one redirect which would take you to: ...


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Boot Linux from live CD (e.g. Knoppix), mount HDD and remove the folder. Your Windows may still be infected, though.


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Setting for this prompt is found in "Start Menu" > "Internet Options" > "Security" > (Internet) > "Custom level..." > "Launching applications and unsafe files" > choose one of the following options; Disable Enable Prompt (recommended) UAC settings also plays a role in preventing files from running.


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"could this technically have harmed my PC?" YES, it was an executable which was loaded into memory and running under your user account with your permissions, possibly even elevated as an installer. Whether it did or not, who knows? But it was delivered under shady circumstances (file name redirection; leveraging the "hide extensions default"), and is ...


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It depends on the virus. There are many viruses that just claim something that is not fully true. There are 3 major possibilities: the disk (some files of it) is really encrypted and the key is send to its creators (as it is claimed). In this case the creators will restore your data, when you do what they want. No other options for you. the disk (some ...


1

If they've really been encrypted, you personally can't do anything to recover the encrypted data. For the future, make frequent backups, and consider using Linux (or a VM) if you must visit shady websites and/or run unknown software often.


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I agree there may be value in backing up because the way this works - and indeed it may even be possie to recover some s data from it (due to the way it encrypts - recoverable deleted copies of some data probably exist, and might be recoverable with photorec or similar). In order to fo the best possible backup you really eant to do a bitcopy of the drive. ...



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