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0

Changing the host where the DB is located should be enough. However, it seems that your database will be hosted on a remote site, so bear in mind the following: Firewall must be checked on the remote site to allow your VPN connection to connect to the port where your database server will run. If it is hosted, check if the provider allows external ...


0

I am running into the same issue. running windows as VM guest and ubuntu as the host. On my windows machine I can access my VPN using Juniper VPN but from Ubuntu I couldn't so far find a way through.


1

VPN stands for virtual private networking. VPNs connect 2 different private networks across a public network, or to connect a single host to a private network. By private I mean not publicly routable. Your friends address 10.1.10.213 lies in private network range that is not publicly routable so he probably has a small home/office router performing NAT ...


0

Per @mogget: "The VPN tunnel will only encrypt the data between you and the VPN entry point. Meaning that the data content will be encrypted and you will communicate with the broker using a secure tunnel, but the broker itself is still aware of your real IP address. From there on and out into the world, only the brokers IP address is seen and you are hidden ...


0

The fact that the machine that serves as the VPN server runs on the same network doesn't matter. When you set up a VPN server, you're creating a virtual interface with a network (for example, one might be using a private class C network as the internal network use, say 192.168.1.0/24, and at the same time use a private class A network, say 10.10.10.0/24, for ...


0

I don't know much this helps, but using the DD-WRT OpenVPN GUI works fine for me. I have not yet got the CLI to work: I have a remote OpenVPN server that works fine with my PCs and Android phones. I recently put dd-wrt on my routers, a D-Link DIR-825 and a Netgear r7000; I'm now just using the r7000. I have a USB stick in the router, which for example ...


2

You can enable split tunneling using Powershell too. For example, in Windows 10 the "Use default gateway in remote" option is not accesible. Set-VpnConnection -Name vpn-connection-name -SplitTunneling $true


1

You need to do source (policy) based routing (There are a number of posts on it on SU, like this one. You will probably find the initial packet is getting to your web server, but the response is being sent back out the VPN rather then the WAN interface. To fix this you need a second route table, which directs traffic based on destination address.


0

You may have Internet Connection Sharing service active, like when you set your computer as a wifi hotspot. Sharing connections may prevent Cisco VPN service to run. In Windows 7 or 8, open local services configuration, look for Internet Connection Sharing service and stop it (double-click and hit "Stop"). Try starting the VPN client service again by ...


2

Do you mean you are trying to get two LANs of the same subnet to talk via a VPN? You use the term "192.168.0.x" so one would assume you are talking about a range of IPs within the given 192.168.0.x subnet. The reason why you can't (and shouldn't) is due to the fact that a router's job is to route traffic from a known network to an unknown network. When a ...


0

Changing to a different router fixed the problem. No idea why.


0

The answer is: it depends whether you are using OpenVPN in the bridged or routed mode: you have a routed OpenVPN if your new virtual interface is tunX, a bridged OpenVPN if, instead, you have a tapX virtual interface. For bridged OpenVPN: select, in the VirtualBox screen, Network-> Bridged Adapter, Name -> tap0. For routed Openvpn: select, in the ...


0

I like @0xC0000022L's "mode switch" idea. It seems like it should work for you, particularly for your testing. There are at least a few ways to make this scheme work for the case where you are demonstrating it to other people. Build a webpage that you can visit and supply a list of one or more IPs or even ranges of IP's that treated in this special ...


0

In most cases only the initiating machine will use the vpn connection. This will not affect the other machines. But this depend on what is installed on the machine that initiate the connection. This machine could "listen" to the traffic on the home network and forward the information to the office, for example; but this suppose it has been specifically ...


1

Unless your work laptop hosts a service that other computers on your home LAN are connected to (such as a proxy or internet connection sharing), anything you access on your other computers at home should not be visible to your work network. If your VPN works like most VPNs, the VPN interface on your laptop will receive an IP address that is internal to ...


0

You didn't say what ODBC driver you're using for the connection, but I might suggest you try a different driver, like my employer's offering, which does take an IP address for the target ASA. The two-week free trial should be enough to confirm whether it does the job you need. That said -- you should be able to adjust your VPN and/or overall networking ...


0

For someone, who is looking for Windows-64 bit, you can download it here Windows 7 64bit


1

How you do this specifically depends on what OS you use and what firewall you use. The general rule is to set your firewall to block connections by default so nothing can access the internet at all, then manually add the required rules for the VPN to work. In Windows for example, the built-in firewall rules can be changed to default block on outbound on a ...


0

In rasphone.pbk: As well as setting IpProritizeRemote=0 , I found it necessary to set IPInterfaceMetric=1 . This is the same as ticking the box "automatic metric" in the original properties form (I think).


0

If they already know who you are (if you pay them they do) then there is really no point, is there? To an outside observer your VPN traffic is unintelligible either way.


0

If you execute the .msi file rather than the .exe it will not peform the version check. There are also a few other steps that you need to perform to get the client to work on Windows 10 however, so I suggest you follow the steps on this site: http://www.gleescape.com/posts/2917.


1

With all the OpenConnect and VPNC stuff, this feels like herecy, but since the title just mentions accesssing the Cisco VPN... I've been fighting with Cisco AnyConnect 3.1.07021 on an Intel Core i3-based Chromebox running LUbuntu 14.04 through the Crouton chroot software (having an Intel processor on the Chromebox is a hard requirement to run AnyConnect, ...


0

It would take some time and effort on your part to do the set up, but if you are concerned enough about the security risk arising from automatic updates, then you can use your Firewall to block application access. This post gives you the details on how to do this for Windows 7, but most firewalls have a similar concept where you can control the inflow and ...


1

Yes, option: purchase access with a VPN service that allows for a static IP and port forwarding, you will be able to have clients talk directly to your device(s) as you'd expect. Option two: Find a deal on a VPS (Virtual Private Server) and configure a popular VPN software like OpenVPN yourself. End result is the same, configuration part is much more ...


1

It would seem SlickVPN only allow connections with OpenVPN clients, which as you know the DrayTek you have does not support for. The 2820n (the 2820Vn, is the same model as the 2820n with VOIP support so for the purposes of setup guides etc on the VPN search for 2820n) supports PPTP, IPSec, L2TP and L2TP over IPSec. So you have those options to choose ...


0

Same issue here with Ubuntu 15 and OpenVPN 2.3.2: the "dhcp-option DNS 8.8.8.8" is not taken into account by the client. My solution was to use the Network Management Framework (+openvpn plugin) to setup the VPN. But again, the "dhcp-option DNS" is not taken into account, so I added 8.8.8.8 manually in "IPV4 settings / DNS servers". Only then I can see in ...


0

The best way to ensure all traffic is routed through your VPN would be to run a VPN client inside the virtual machine. If you're running an OpenVPN client in the VM, you can set the push "redirect-gateway" option in your configuration to ensure all client traffic is directed through the VPN. If the server connection is lost, all client requests should then ...


1

Sounds like you are looking for a "bridged" rather than a NAT virtual interface. This way you can bind the virtual interface (meaning the interface for communication between your Mac host and the Windows guest) to only one specific interface of the host. As far as I understand the question, you have a VPN interface set up on the host, right? For details see ...


1

Disclaimer: I've never used Virtualbox so this might not be possible. Option 1 Bind the network adapter of the Windows Machine to the openvpn interface. Option 2 Slightly more complicated, create a network infront of the Windows box, and use a small Openvpn router on linux then set up iptables to only allow Windows to use the openvpn interface. There ...


0

When you connect to the VPN, it will create different connections each time you connect so that your own network remains hidden. This ensures that your information is not being exposed. However, this should not be disabling your internet connection. While connected to the VPN if you're unable to browser this is normally due to the dns or a port being ...


1

Windows already has a built in feature for this. It's called "Windows Remote Assistance" and I use it with remotely connected staff all the time. The remote person uses the "Windows Remote Assistance" tool which is built into windows and sends a request via e-mail. The support engineer receives an e-mail with a link and can establish a remote session, much ...


4

You can use this powershell command to enable/disable default gateway on VPN: Set-VpnConnection -Name "myVPN" -SplitTunneling $True


0

On Windows 7 you were able to control this via either registry or Connection Manager Admin Kit The registry to edit is: User Key: [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\InternetSettings] Value Name: DisablePasswordCaching Data Type: REG_DWORD (DWORD Value) Value Data: (0 = default, 1 = disable password cache) ...


1

If you have admin rights as well, you can go into the registry, load their hive and browse their Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall area and run any uninstall strings you see. This won't work every time tho. The only real way to clear everything out would be to change their password, log in and uninstall from appwiz.cpl.


0

I tried all proposed solutions on Windows 8.1, but they only got me further into trouble. I ended up with a large number of irremovable WAN Miniport devices. I could only get out of that mess by manually editing the registry. Download PSTools by SysInternals Run regedit with psexec psexec -i -s -d regedit.exe Warning: Backup registry keys before ...


0

You will need to set your Windows firewall to allow access to those SMB shares. Windows Firewall by default does not allow access to file sharing (incidentally, ping is counted as file sharing) outside of the "Local subnet", however it defines that. http://www.npcglib.org/~stathis/blog/2013/02/18/windows-task-sharing-files-across-different-subnets/ Change ...


7

The revelation that the American and British governments have cracked SSL/TLS They haven't "cracked" it sufficiently to make it unusable. They've been abusing bugs which got fixed long ago – some of them were bugs in the individual TLS libraries, but protocols can get updates too, like how the hopelessly-broken WEP and SSLv2 were upgraded to WPA and ...


0

This happens to me when I'm on the VPN and wifi gets disconnected or switches networks. Solution: sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder


0

No, it's not a port. It's one layer down from that. It's an IP Protocol Number. For example, TCP is IP Protocol Number 6 and UDP is 17. If the admin UI for your router doesn't mention protocol number forwarding anywhere, try making your VPN server the "DMZ host" or "Default Server". Different products call it different things, but it basically lets you ...


0

Check username under which openvp daemon is running and chown your script folder or file to it.


1

I ran into the same issue, luckily I found a solution. Here are things I checked: permission of folder permission of openvpn to access script the script must list the full path of any commands used (ex. grep should be /bin/grep; you can find the full path by typing which in front of your command) use script-security 2 system instead


1

It sees it just fine, logs in fine, but as soon as I try to take the session, it hangs and loses connection. Try lowering MTU for VPN interface. I've had similar issues, when Linux client would connect to Windows RRAS server via PPTP and then drop VPN connection when trying to SSH over VPN. Lowering MTU on client (1400 → 1372, AFAIK) fixed this issue.


2

May not necessarily be the answer, but I think that a security feature in your VPN connector is that it connects to the VPN using the logged-on user's credentials, hence if you're not logged on you don't get connected to the VPN (and subsequently can't RDP it from work). If you can reconfigure the software to start as a Windows Service (instead of as ...


2

OpenSSH (which I'm assuming is what you are using) has an AllowUsers option: AllowUsers - This keyword can be followed by a list of user name patterns, separated by spaces. If specified, login is allowed only for user names that match one of the patterns. Only user names are valid; a numerical user ID is not recognized. By default, login is allowed for ...


1

you can use your systems iptables. This three lines would do the magic # iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -s 192.168.0.0/24 -j ACCEPT # iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -s 127.0.0.0/8 -j ACCEPT # iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -j DROP maybe you do have to adjust the parameters like the Lan ip addresses. if your vpn users gets routed to eg ...


0

For the directories not found: That's because there is no /home/root. Instead you have /root as your home directory. Basically use your tutorial but replace everything having to do with /home/username to be /root. However, I suggest you don't use the root user for it all. It could be a security risk, make sure you drop the user perms used by the OpenVPN ...


2

Pause suspends communication over the VPN without breaking the underlying connection. This means it can be resumed right away as there is no need to reconnect as a disconnection was not made.


-1

On destination server open The Local Group Policy Editor Go to: User Configuration | Administrative Templates | Windows Components | Remote Desktop Services Select the Remote Desktop Connection Client item under Remote Desktop Services. In the Setting list on the right, double-click on the Do not allow passwords to be saved setting. Set it to enable. Now ...


-1

I'm just pasting from the original article. Credits to his author. This worked for me. Got some good news. We found a workaround. A colleague pointed me to the right direction (thanks Philippe! :-)). The properties of VPN connections are stored in PBK-files. There seems to be one file per user which contains all connections. The file is located ...


1

I had this exact issue as it would not get an IP address. After trying to remove re-adding, assigning manual IP, I googled and found this and it worked: Press the Windows Key + X together and select Command Prompt (admin). Type the following commands and hit Enter after each: netsh winsock reset catalog (reset winsock entries) netsh int ip reset ...



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