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0

I ended up using vpnc since it is a Cisco network.


4

This was to do with the OpenVPN server's compression feature, meaning that more data can be sent at once. This, therefore, meant the connection was faster. To confirm this, I disabled the compression feature and had this speed: ...whereas with compression enabled, consequently had this speed: It seems that had I used a standard VPN other than OpenVPN ...


0

Once you are connected you can access any other subnet within that network. So when I connect to OpenVPN I get a IP address of 192.168.200.X with my home network on the subnet 192.168.1.X So all I need to do is access 192.168.1.X and then can access any device on that network as well.


1

I think in your case OpenVPN should be fine.


0

I do use Gnome Boxes as well, running a Win 7 VM. I never had any issues about VPN connections from the VM when the host is connected. If you have some static routes on OpenVPN, maybe will be necessary to set them up also in the VM.


0

I see that disabling ICS did not work for the OP, but it worked for me and many others, according to various forums, it seems. It may be a ThinkPad-specific issue. Lenovo published an advisory article indicating that their Access Connections software interferes with AnyConnect. The solution is to disable ICS. I don't have a way to establish whether this is ...


0

This is normal. Port forwarding only works for connections from the outside in. Port forwarding will not allow servers on a LAN to connect to machines on that same LAN using the router's public IP address. That requires a form of dual NAT (NAT both before routing and after routing) called hairpinning. Some routers do hairpinning when you configure port ...


0

I found a way to have multiple OpenVPN associated to different browser instances, configuring the VPN to work only for a specific user. The solution was found here. Thanks!


0

If the "client" device is a Linux box it would be easier to do on the device. If you want to do it on a Windows machine, it's still fairly easy, you need to open Windows Firewall and go to Advanced Settings, right click on Outbound Rules and click New. Create new outbound port-based rule(s) to block every port other than 3389 to whatever interface or subnet ...


0

The answer depends on where the VPN is "terminating". There are two possibilities. If the VPN is terminated at the PC, e.g. in Windows, then no you cannot (or rather should not) since traffic to the remote network is forced into the VPN on the computer & you would have to define a "split tunnel" to hive off some traffic to go to other devices on the ...


2

This thread comes up on a lot of Google searches for Mac OS X compatibility with SonicWall VPNs, so even though the thread is old, I just wanted to post that YES, Mac OS X's native VPN client works fine with SonicWall's L2TP VPN. Third-party VPN clients are nice and full-featured, but certainly not required. Proper configuration is necessary on the UTM-side, ...


0

With a VPN, you extend your private network over untrusted public network (the Internet). You should then be able to reach other computers with their local IP address, as soon as your client is configured for and if your network topology is compatible : you can be on different subnets for instance.


1

There is no absolutely sure way, to find out. Because there might be some software installed on your system, that always tracks your actions. But you can find out, if your Traffic runs through the VPN. Just visit whatsmyip.org with and without VPN, and compare. If it's the same IP, it looks like your traffic is not affected by the vpn. If it's different, ...


3

Yes, you can mix 2003, 2008 and 2012 domain controllers in a single domain. Ensure your AD forest and domain functional levels are set to at least 2003 before attempting to add a 2012 server to an EXISTING domain (Server 2012 can't deal with a Server 2000 level AD). When creating a new forest and domain, ensure the functional level is set to match to ...


1

Per browser window proxy It is unlikely that there is a solution for this on a per tab basis. However, you could use the profile feature (or incognito) to allow multiple instances of the browser. Each browser window then can manage its own extensions, thus, can manage its own proxy settings. Here is how I did it in Chrome. In the upper right corner of the ...


0

Have a look at this question: How can I make the Windows VPN route selective traffic (by destination network)? I think you should be able to adapt that to your use case. I know this would be better suited as a comment, but I don't have enough reputation yet so I have to put it in an answer.


0

HTG has a good article, How to Create a VPN Server on Your Windows Computer Without Installing Any Software. It is a good step-by-step walk-through of how to set it up and explains its limitations.


0

on the Windows 7 VM, ICS (Internet Connection Sharing) will probably work: ICS and VPN connections If you create a virtual private network (VPN) connection on your host computer to a corporate network and then enable ICS on that connection, all Internet traffic is routed to the corporate network and all of the computers on your home ...


0

First and foremost the excellent figure linked from the ArchLinux wiki iptables page is useful in identifying packet flow through the various iptables chains (at the bottom of the answer). Backup iptables-save > back.up.file Check for your flavor of Linux distribution, I needed to add sudo as I wasn't root. Question 2(a), 2(b) To determine source ...


1

I just checked with my support department at PureVPN and they told me that Android OS has a limitation that it cannot make a VPN hotspot. Sorry :(


1

Answer 1 In the OpenVPN client file client.ovpn find and comment out this line if it exists: redirect-gateway # This is a comment so change line above to this # redirect-gateway If the admin or server hasn't put this in the client file or is "pushing" redirect-gateway, you can manually override it following these instructions: IgnoreRedirectGateway. To ...


0

Turn off DHCP on the server (being that you want the router handing it out, not your PC since you're bridging VPN clients onto the local network) and turn on DHCP on the client, which should let it grab an IP dynamically (unless you need it static?). Either way, your router and server both answering DHCP broadcasts for the same subnet is going to cause ...


0

From what I can tell, you're talking about split-tunneling (or rather, trying to disable it). Take a look at the redirect-gateway directive in OpenVPN: https://openvpn.net/index.php/open-source/documentation/howto.html#redirect


0

I made it following below steps. Click "PPP Settings..." under the Options tab, check "Negotiate multi-link for single-link connections". Under Security Tab, set Type of VPN to L2TP/IPsec. Click Advanced settings, enter/paste your pre-shared key. Then follow the steps in Apple's Support page here. Restart and you should connect.


0

Have you tried bridging the connections via network and sharing center? Also connect w/ a smartphone and see if dhcp is working. You need the right DNS server to see the domain.


0

Here is an interesting interactive illustration of who can see what when you use the internet with a decent virtual machine on a three machine virtual network using cerificates and encryption. Also what can be seen when you use Tor. And who can see what when you use neither https://www.eff.org/pages/tor-and-https


-1

The only way to connect to the outside world is trough the ISP. So let's check what is happening: When you use a VPN, you are opening something like a tunnel from your PC to the VPN server. Imagine that you write a letter to someone but instead of using your plain language you use an encrypted language. The Mail Service could open and try to read your ...


3

Your ISP will be able to see that encrypted data is being sent to an endpoint, but they won't be able to actually know what this data is. Your ISP will also be able to see how much bandwidth you're using and could somewhat guess what you're using the VPN connection for, for example: Up to 10GB/Mo : Basic web surfing/email Up to 40GB/Mo : As above, but with ...


0

As @BigChris said, The VPN should be OK once the tunnel is up, but only if the host servers are actually secure, and haven't got malware or bugs in the OS. Rule of thumb: if you think a hotspot is insecure, it probably is. If you have mobile data available, use the hotspot function on your phone to create a temporary connection, connect to the VPN, then, ...


0

Essentially you can do this but as stated earlier: you will require a host machine. In other words: you must create a connection between your Raspberry Pi and some host system. Then you will need to have your Raspberry Pi tunnel all its internet traffic through the host system. This article will provide you with a step-by-step guide on how to set up a Linux ...


0

In order for your internet traffic to appear to come from another IP address, you will need to have another IP address to come from. As you surmised, a VPN service provides this. Your internet traffic is tunnelled over a VPN to a third party, then goes to the internet from that third party. And the traffic between you and the third party is encrypted. ...


-1

Which part is failing for you? The client side or the server side? You can test the client by trying to connect to a free VPN service (Try googling on free vpn services). If it's the server, make sure you've port forwarded. You can check this by using a port scanner like this one. I'm guessing you're trying to setup a PPTP tunnel and so if "VPN [PPTP]" is ...


0

The firewall was missing a rule for incoming UDP packets on port 500. This should have been generated automatically but (sometimes) failed. After adding that rule manually, the problem was solved. The IPfire project also created a patch that will probably fix the root cause.


0

Ok, I solved this issue, I had to add the route 10.8.0.0/24 to the routing tables (on the router) and everything started to run smoothly


0

OK guys, i finally got it: route -p add 192.168.2.0 mask 255.255.255 192.168.1.254 It was actually very simple :/ Route says that my all conections to 192.168.2.0 (Main site IP) will use gateway 192.168.1.254(VPN router IP) All NIC's in the network still have the default gateway 192.168.0.1 which is my internet router but when any conection try to go to ...


1

What you might consider, is looking at a DigitalOcean container. Containers are a form of a Virtual Machine, but the kernel is on the host of the VM, which means that the size of the container and the resource usage is lower. There are a lot of other container providing services, so do some research on that.


0

Usually, when you get those outputs, it is because the systems contacted by traceroute are not responding with ICMP Time Exceeded or ICMP Echo Reply messages (or perhaps you are blocking them on your end before they reach you). Traceroute requires systems to send these messages in order to work. A VPN is designed to extend a LAN to a remote location and to ...


0

You should first view your gateway like this in terminal: /sbin/ip addr show ppp0 | grep peer | awk ' { print $4 } ' | sed 's/\/32//' Then in terminal use: ip route replace default via xx:xx:xx:xx dev ppp0 Replace xx:xx... with your gateway found in step one. Seen from here


0

Providing your VPN encrypts the data you send and receive securely, you are pretty safe. I'm not familiar with Avast's VPN system as I use Cyberghost myself. The basic principal behind a VPN, however, is that the software on your PC will encrypt data, send it to a VPN server, which decrypts it, connects to the server of whatever website you're connecting ...


2

In the end, you are never entirely safe from your ISP, but you are probably safe enough, unless your adversary is a nation-state level actor. for instance the ISP can always intercept your VPN connection initiation, and masquerade as the VPN provider, which exposes all of your traffic to them. It's not an easy attack, but many ISPs have lots of resources to ...


4

The last FF update messed with my settings. Deleted my homepage, some stored certificates, and it might have even messed with some config information. My guess is the university network does a MitM of your TLS connections which isn't uncommon for larger organizations. And the last FF update deleted the stored certificate for the university. It's only ...


0

I found a solution by changing the client side only. In the table above, the route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 On-link 192.168.10.2 sends everything through the VPN. If I uncheck the option "Use default gateway on remote network" (on the VPN connection, right click Properties -> Networking -> IP V4 -> Properties -> Advanced), this route disappear: nothing ...


1

Short answer, you cannot change the ip of the VPN interface, as it is being given to you by the oposite site. Given that 10.x is a class A network, you usually don't have a Class A network on both sides, which makes me wonder how you ended up with a class A network you're currently in. Either ask the opposite side to change their network, or change yours.



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