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435

One reason is that web designers nowadays like to use web fonts (usually in WOFF format), e.g. through Google Web fonts. Previously, the only fonts that were able to be displayed on a site was those that the user had locally installed. Since e.g. Mac and Windows users not necessarily had the same fonts, designers instinctively always defined rules as ...


102

The reason for this is the text you can't read yet is being rendered with a web font that is still on its way down the pipes to your browser. Also, since your browser is Google Chrome, which uses WebKit to render the page, it was decided by them (WebKit that is) that it's best for you not to see any text at all until the web font is downloaded. If, however, ...


12

I often it may be a deliberate choice to avoid the "flash of unstyled content". If the text displayed before the CSS was loaded, you'd briefly see it as it appears raw, and then a flash as the browser redraws it. By putting in some basic inline styles to initially hide the content, that are overridden in the actual stylesheet, or using JS, developers avoid ...


12

Short answer: AJAX or WOFF There are several causes of websites being "slow to display their text". The slowness on portableapps.com is caused by downloading WOFF fonts. However, what you describe as "text starts appearing here and there" is more often caused by AJAX. A website is made up of many parts. How these parts are downloaded and assembled is a ...


6

As others have noted, custom fonts are likely contributing to the delay. To give a little more background, the browser is doing roughly the following before it can render the page contents to the screen: fetch HTML (several round trips for DNS, TCP, request/response) begin to parse HTML, discover external resources such as external CSS and JS. Note that ...


3

Short answer: Developers. When link and script tags referencing external documents (like .css or .js files) are placed in the head of the document (higher in the flow than the body, and its elements), they are loaded first. JavaScript executes from the markup that references it; if there is a lot of code to process, or it's cumbersome code, or more ...


3

From Webkit timeout kills long running tasks : We have just been forced to refactor/recode a significant portion of one of our AIR based RIA's due to an arbitrary decision made by the Webkit team to restrict all XML HTTP requests via a hard coded, hidden timeout of 60 seconds. This decision not only affects AIR but also affects Safari and other ...


2

In a nutshell, too many loadable objects that need to be loaded from separate HTTP GETs before the page can be displayed, and an over reliance on average latency as a measure of site health. The first refers to all those .css, .js, and webfonts that the page loads, not to mention the fact that many sites also need to retrieve JSON objects viea XHR requests ...


1

It was a piece of garbage software (malware?) called Browser Defender.


1

Works for me with Opera and Chromium. If you can browse to any website but that one, it may be blocked. Follow up It did not work for me with Chrome on a Windows machine. They may be blocking certain browsers for some reason. Nothing you can do about it.


1

Chrome and Safari are both based on WebKit under the hood but I've seldom had problems with them on a system that wasn't broken. Firefox is not really related (It's mozilla/gecko) but it just sometimes fails to start, even on a good day. I have experienced what you are describing with firefox and almost always it has been a program failing to start or stop ...


1

Chrome, Firefox, and Visual Studio all use a lot of memory, I don't know about Opera, but Internet Explorer uses the least amount of resources/memory (in comparison to the other applications). Your computer could be running out of memory, depending on how much you have installed, or your RAM could be corrupt/bad. I'd run MemTest and see what results you get. ...


1

I fixed this by rebooting my computer.


1

You need to install Safari on your computer. There are certain libraries which webkit needs which are installed on your computer when you install Safari.


1

Alexey Proskuryakov of the WebKit team told me: I think that nightlies still happen to work on Windows for now, so what you mentioned should do it. We don't put any effort in making nightlies work with anything but the latest Safari release however, which is currently 6.0.1.


1

I'm sure that it is possible to build a given software package on a given OS version. It might take a lot of work assembing all the necessary packages at the right release level, and then having to install these files in non-standard locations. You still have an integration job in that things still have to be tested to make sure the standard library set ...



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