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30

Use 7Zip. It will unpack MSI , CAB and a lot more packages for you . -EDIT- And its open source, so no nagging messages begging you to buy the stuff


24

Windows installer first systematically creates a system restore point, which is a quite slow operation. Also from the article entitled, appropriately, "Windows Installer sucks", an excerpt: It used to be that installation would consist of a program executing and taking a few simple steps to install your software, then do the reverse on ...


22

.msi files can be executed with msiexec.exe, so in combination with the runas command, you could accomplish what your want: runas /user:administrator "msiexec /i <path and filename of your msi>" As a full-path to the file is recommended, it might need quotes around it and you need to escape them then with a backslash \: runas /user:administrator ...


21

There is also lessmsi which is completely free and open source: http://code.google.com/p/lessmsi/


16

Windows Installer indeed has a reputation for being slow. There are a few things that contribute to this and I'm going to address them below. But ultimately, one should ask themselves if one, two, or three minutes is really a matter of contention when installing and uninstalling software. I take more time than that flipping through TV channels :) The ...


11

Usually msi packages are provided for system administrators who would have the need to deploy the software to several terminals over a network. The results are no different from using an executable, but msi packages sometimes do have additional options such as doing silent or pre-configured installs. If you are not a system administrator, use the ...


11

I believe it stems from home users that may have a "family PC". Kids don't want "Family Tree Maker" and parents don't want "Spongebob Squarepants - the Video Game" on their respective start menus.


10

I believe that the Windows Installer uses the %TMP% environment variable. You may want to check this value and see if it happens to be pointing to your External HD drive letter. UPDATE Weird... this does seem to be a "feature" of Windows Installer (to use the drive with the most free space). I can't find an option to disable it. I wonder if you can lock ...


10

I ran into this issue, too. Alexey Ivanov's response didn't quite help me, but it did, however, inspire me to investigate C:\Users\x\AppData\Local\Temp. As usual, error messages were only half-useful. In my case, the DLL wasn't missing--the installer didn't have permissions to access the folder. I didn't try running the installer as an administrator--this ...


9

Well, I think the answer depends on how the application you're installing has been developed. Does it correctly place all user-created data into appropriate folders under a user's profile, or is it designed to run universally (and store user-created data in a common folder structure such as all users)? Does it rely on registry keys in a user's profile ...


9

"Just for me" should mean that the application installs into a user directory and only creates shortcuts for the current user. This could be useful e.g. when the user does not have admin rights (and therefore can't write into %PROGRAMFILES%, HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, and other interesting places). If you force "install for everybody", you may be limiting the ...


9

I got it to work. What I did: Remove all USB devices except the keyboard Set the boot order in the BIOS so that the HDD is first Disconnect the network Use a DVD (not usb) for installation I had tried each of these things individually and in different combinations. I'm not sure why it suddenly worked now, but windows setup was suddenly able to create a ...


8

Sometimes installers put required files in system directories. Uninstallers has knowledge of where these files are and all registry values to be removed. Unless you are sure you know all the directories where these files are, better leave the uninstallation to the uninstaller. Removing programs by removing directories will almost always result in "leftover" ...


8

Perhaps try this mirror from FileHippo, if read more people complaining about the sourceforge download being corrupt


8

I've been using Revo Uninstaller for over a year to clean out the junk (registry keys, empty folder), and it works great in Advanced mode. Totally free.


8

Except for speed issues (there is a lot of discussion here on that topic with some saying it is actually beneficial to performance in some ways) there is no issues in using NTFS compression a current Windows installation disk and all it's folders in it. Your files are there, available, they do not really change to a secret compressed file or something, ...


7

Run Process Monitor from Microsoft (originally SysInternals). It will give you a ton of output, but you can filter on your folder name.


7

The MSI packages are so that they can push out the updates through SCCM or other means. Manually pushing out updates or creating is frankly stupid, unless you work with a trivial number of systems - you would need to log into each system, and do it, while not getting in the way of the user.. It also means a single point of failure and its harder to track ...


7

Decompressing. That is the most common reason for using processing power. There are a lot of other reasons too depending on what is installed such as compiling or calculating.


6

I use Inno Setup for all my installers. It's free and fairly extensible. I also recommend ISTool as a better IDE for InnoSetup.


6

Why does the external monitor only work if Windows is installed? That's not normal. The notebook's video card should detect the presence of the external monitor and display on it automatically. There are two primary modes of operation for this: mirroring and expansion. The former simply mirrors the contents of the internal display onto the external display, ...


6

You can find the correct product code to pass to msiexec /x by opening in the registry (regedit). Open the key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall Select the Uninstall key and "Find" from the "Edit" menu. Search for "Java." This should show which subkey the Java is located under. One of the keys is ...


6

As the comments said, USB 3 drivers are not something that Windows supports natively. Your main question came about the speed - there will be no difference unless your USB memory stick is USB 3 compatible. This gets quite advanced, I am assuming you have a working knowledge of the command prompt. I would recommend you add the various Microsoft directories ...


6

Yes, there is nothing special about the Installer directory that requires them to be uncompressed. In the old days, there were piles of installer files like unwise.exe, unvise32.exe, uninstall.exe, etc. in the \Windows\ directory; sometimes shared, sometimes not. The \Windows\Installer folder is the Windows Installer cache, which allows each program to ...


6

You can always open a command prompt as an administrator (either right-click runas or start->run->runas /user:administrator cmd), change to the directory where your MSI exists, and execute msiexec /i product.msi Or add this to your register: HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Msi.Package\shell\runas\command Values: Install &as... ...


6

Windows installer has many big advantages for corporate deployment, some of which I have described here: http://serverfault.com/a/274609/20599 Much of the slowness of a Windows Installer session is due to its rollback capabilities. Firstly it creates a restore point prior to install or uninstall (provided system restore hasn't been disabled). Then it will ...


6

Go grab the Process Explorer from Sysinternals. You should be able to see the msiexec.exe service running, and if something is in the middle of installing you should see other msiexec.exe children processes. It would be best to allow them to finish, and maybe try to squeak your install in between. I have seen it before where the .NET Runtime Optimization ...


6

Sorry for posting this. After hours of trying to figure this out I just did a little more research and got it. Apparently my user was the only user with privileges on the folder and file containing the .msi file. I added the SYSTEM user to have read and execute privileges on the folder containing the installer file and voila...it works and installs now.


6

This happens from time to time, I typically see it either when there is a broken install or an update process running. 95% of the time it is a broken installer that hasn't quit. I would advise launching Task Manager and force any instances of SETUP.EXE or MSIEXEC.EXE to quit. Hopefully this should help you!



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