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Variant C: Get a copy of GParted from www.gparted.org. Put the ISO on a USB-stick or CD. From a CMD-prompt with admin-rights run chkdsk /f on your C: and E: drives to make sure they are both without any problems. Install the new disk as extra disk in your system. Boot gparted from CD or USB stick Copy, using gparted your exisitng E: to the new disk. ...


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Variant A of your perceived solutions should work perfectly on the condition that the folder structure that currently exists on E is maintained on X (the new E). When you think about it, all the computer will "see" by the time you have finished is that partition E will be slightly smaller and partition C will be slightly bigger - as long as the registry ...


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I eventually got it working. After doing some digging and again re-creating my user account, I have discovered that the AppData for the Windows Store had been encrypted from my previous Windows 8 install. So this time when I recreated my account and copied over my files, I excluded the Appdata folder and the store now works perfectly.


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(Copied from comments as per TO's request): The thing is, this menu is (as far as I know) not defined by external parameters in the registry or something, it's just part of the logic inside explorer.exe. So we would need to effectively modify explorer.exe's logic, which is possible by loading our own code into it and intercepting the action of opening the ...


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It's inside shell32.dll Try running: grep -ain "taskmgr.exe" shell32.dll > shell32-grep.txt Most of the text you'll receive will be an xml. Open it with a text editor and search for taskmgr.exe, you'll find it in the tag <sh:command>. Look around and you'll see the other options (and bunch of others) as well under other <sh:command> tags. ...


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According to my tests, it can be set in Group policy, but is ignored by MusNotification which controls reboot after update. See this posts http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-update/my-work-lost-after-window-10-nightly-restart-for/e55c0399-5fad-4e64-b3c4-301838a1d5f6?auth=1 ...


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The only way of knowing all that is to log all the changes the installer does to the system and then, when the program is being uninstalled, undo all those changes according to this log. All else is just guessing. This is, actually, the method the uninstaller for every program works, at least in theory - there is a list of folders/files/registry-entries ...


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HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\W32Time\Parameters](time) "Type"="NoSync"(off) "Type"="NTP" (on) [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\tzautoupdate](time zone) "Start"=dword:00000003 (off) "Start"=dword:00000004 (on)


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Have you tried in Google Chrome's settings? open the menu on the right, choose settings, type default, and the option should appear. But my home Windows 10 resets defaults all the time, it seems to be a bug. You can also follow the winsupersite manual, The gist: "click the Start Button in the lower left corner of your main Windows screen (or press the ...


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--make-default-browser doesn't work in Windows 10... 10 is the only one I tried. I've been looking for an answer to this as well. No joy so far. Would love an answer.


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I seem to remember when using DOS cmd file queries, a question mark means single character wildcard. The double question mark I'm clueless to, unless it simply means a part of a path with 2 sequential wildcard characters. Hope this helps. i.e. ?: could be C: or D: unlike \d*\ which means d char with any number and type of letters or numbers following e.g. ...


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There is a little typo: double quote missing: reg add "HKLM\ … \FxProperties /f /v … |<-------- here reg add "HKLM\ … \FxProperties" /f /v … For a wonder, reg query and reg add raise another error in case of such simple syntax mistake: ==> reg query "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Test Key /v "{testval},1" ERROR: The system was unable ...


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this will not work.. this is tested and working you can you this below..save as filename.reg or update GPO base from the location details below and the value of registry [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings\Zones\3] ...


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Use this WMIC command in an elevated command prompt to get a list of all hotfixes installed. This will not include any updates that were deleted using Disk Cleanup>cleanup system files>windows update cleanup. wmic qfe


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in SEARCH, type CMD, and with right click choose "RUN AS ADMINISTRATOR" and execute this command (just change USER_NAMEEEEE below): reg add "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon" /t REG_SZ /v DefaultDomainName /d YOUR_USER_NAMEEEEEEEEEEE /f && reg add "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon" /t REG_SZ /v ...


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void WriteContextMenu(LPSTR key, LPSTR value) { HKEY hkey=0; DWORD disp; if(RegCreateKeyEx(HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT, key, 0, NULL, REP_OPTION_NON_VOLATILE, KEY_WRITE,NULL, &hkey, &disp)!=ERROR_SUCCESS) { if(RegOpenKey(HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT,key,&hkey)!=ERROR_SUCCESS) { cout<<"Unable to open Registry"<<key; } ...


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The general syntax (as shown in reg add /?) is: reg add <key> [/v <value>] [/t <type>] [/d <data>] So your .reg file corresponds to: reg add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\CredentialsDelegation /v AllowSavedCredentialsWhenNTLMOnly /t REG_DWORD /d 0x00000001 reg add ...


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Try Sysinternals Autoruns to find the automatically launching URL. Download the program at https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb963902.aspx and look through the various startup programs (there are a lot). I think you can also search for the offending link.


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Ok I've found the answer here if anyone is interested. [enter link description here][1] and it works perfectly Below is a quote from that link Here is the reg tweak...for the side one-touch keys (that is what they are called) Internet Key: HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Appkey\7 "Association"="http" ; Change the ...


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Scrapping my previous answer, since I see you want to do it via Registry. That's a terrible idea, registry hacking is always a last resort, since it breaks so easily. All I can say is good luck; the key you want is HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Lock Screen, but the format is completely opaque, and that's not all: The actual lock ...


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Though this doesn't completely answer your question, This was possible till Windows 8.1 using the minWidth registry hack found here. In Windows 10, it is possible if you move your taskbar to a side... Or, You could use a 3rd party program called 7+ Taskbar Tweaker...(It was recently updated to work with Win 10.) Result...


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Ok I seem to have it figured out now. You can add a new trusted location via registry by creating a new Registry Key like this: HKCU:\Software\Microsoft\Office\16.0\Word\Security\Trusted Locations\Location99. This is the key that has to be created. Then it is needed to add a string Description with the value of the Location folder. In this case "99". ...



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