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0

While the answers are (probably, I didn't check) correct, the sane way to modify file associations is with the GUI Microsoft designed for it. (That is, if you are a user and not a setup developer.) Here is one tutorial with nice pictures, I found it with google: http://www.7tutorials.com/how-associate-file-type-or-protocol-program But you can just open ...


4

Because it is impossible. The registry has multiple root nodes, but only two interesting ones: LocalMachine and CurrentUser. Normally, the setup writes values into LocalMachine, and the running program ONLY writes into CurrentUser (actually, unless the setup messes with the permissions, the running program can't write into LocalMachine.) While keeping ...


5

There are many reasons this is the case, however it is not the fault of Microsoft or the Windows operating systems. The following is a list of some the cases and reasons behind leaving registry entries: Bad programming - The developer did not write the application uninstaller properly and the registry entries are left behind. In addition to that, the ...


3

Because of two reasons: Windows doesn't keep track of files or registry entries created by an application and many developers are lazy. Most developers use some default installer tool. This tool will create an installer for your application which copies your applications' files and creates registry keys. Those files and those registry keys are ...


1

From Reg add /? REG ADD KeyName [/v ValueName | /ve] [/t Type] [/s Separator] [/d Data] [/f] KeyName [\\Machine\]FullKey Machine Name of remote machine - omitting defaults to the current machine. Only HKLM and HKU are available on remote machines. FullKey ROOTKEY\SubKey ROOTKEY [ HKLM | HKCU | HKCR ...


1

Straight off the bat - this isn't natively possible. HOWEVER! it may be possible through a script. Theoretically, you could write a small piece of VBScript to update the registry key every minute or two minutes with a new value by reading the screensaver start time. This Scripting guy post shows you how to read when a screensaver kicked in. If you do a ...


0

You can check what applications are launched at system startup/login with Sysinternals Autoruns. If you find out these reg.exe processes are not related to a software you specifically installed you should disable it with Sysinternals Autoruns.


0

It is possible to have that if you have some IBM software installed. IBM Notes for example put on startup 3 registry key who looks like that: HKLM:Run !IBM Notes Browser Plugin IE Registration REG ADD "HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings\ZoneMap\ProtocolDefaults" /v notes /t REG_DWORD /d 2 /f HKLM:Run ...


0

No, the correct thing to do is to right click on HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows and select New => Key and name it Test Drivers - use at own risk To add it from the Command Line, you have to: Paste this into a file and name it import.reg Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\Test Drivers - use ...


0

Boot into Safe mode. Export entire registry. Shutdown PC. On another box, write regular expression or simple script to scan for tokens and insert FQPs. Boot in safe mode again, import modified registry hive. Cross fingers and reboot.


0

A dynamic context menu item like the one WinRAR creates is impossible to do without additional code. You can set the (Default) value for HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\<ProgID>\shell\mymenu to a static string as follows: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\txtfile\shell\mymenu] @="My Menu Entry" ...


1

The answer is I need to use the RunOnce method of HKCU instead of HKLM. The order in which windows execute the startup entries is: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\RunServicesOnce HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\RunServices <Logon Prompt> ...


0

I recently figured out how to do this manually and have added the answer to this question: https://superuser.com/a/914701/422795 - "How can I create a new system folder to show up in “This PC” in Windows 8.1 without additional tools?". It is not for the faint hearted though as it involves a lot of registry editing. However, if you're in a situation where ...


1

Walkthrough for adding a Custom Folder under "This PC". What you need: A folder you'd like to add (in this sample, I'll use "C:\Projects"). An icon for said folder if you want to use a custom icon (in this sample, I'll use "C:\Projects\projects.ico") A GUID (in this sample, I'll use "EB39BB71-9B3B-4C47-BB02-F35CFAED1685". It'll work for your first custom ...


0

I found the answer after looking at the AccessControl parameters closer. I wasn't specific enough in defining the ACL to be added. This is the current code, which only adds the permission to the top key alone; $AddACL = New-Object System.Security.AccessControl.RegistryAccessRule ("Domain Admins","FullControl","Allow") This is the code that allows the ACL ...


0

I found out that you can use SID instead of user/usergroup name so I changed administrators with S-1-5-32-544 and after this the script run just fine.


-1

Right click the .exe in question, click 'Properties'. At the bottom of the Properties dialog window on the General tab, click the 'Unblock' button. If it's not there, or greyed out, move it to the desktop, Unblock it, then move it back. Enjoy.


1

You have probably destroyed the permissions on C. This drive is special and one should never just overwrite brutally all its permissions, since they are very hard (even impossible) to recreate exactly as before. Try to repair Windows as described in How to Do a Repair Install to Fix Windows 7. This mode of soft installation will fix your currently installed ...


0

In your start menu , search for Run dialog box. Type gpedit.msc, then select OK. Go to User Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Attachment Manager. Open the Inclusion list for moderate risk file types setting. Set the policy to Enabled, then add *.exe; or whatever the file extension you are using to the “Specify high risk ...


3

Manifest files contain settings for Windows about how to handle the module at startup. As you already figured out, it can be embedded in the module itself or stay outside as *.manifest file. Normally the embedded one takes priority so that the external one won't count if the module has an embedded one already. The registry setting changes this behaviour to ...


1

You could try PE Network Configurator : PE Network Configurator or PENetCfg is a stand-alone utility that allows you to start and configure networking in Microsoft WinPE and BartPE. With PENetCfg you can do the following: Enable and start networking support if it's not started yet. List all Ethernet adapters on the running machine and ...


0

The only ways to get more available PTEs are: Use a 64-bit (128 GB available for PTEs) installation of Windows instead of a 32-bit (660 MB available for PTEs). See https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/294418 Uninstall any unneeded software that has a filesystem filter driver running. To see what filesystem filter drivers are running, start MSINFO32.EXE ...


1

It definitely sounds like a GPO issue. Have you checked both User Configuration and Computer Configuration? Here's a description of IE9 policy settings, where I think most of the zone security settings were introduced. Here's a reference list of the Windows GPO settings, the IE settings are within that.


0

I have finally found out where was the problem. Maybe it will help somebody in the similar situation. In one of many tries I have set a registry value HKLM/SOFTWARE/Policies/Microsoft/Windows/CurrentVersion/Internet settings/ZoneMapKey to the value of the specified webpage. For some reason this settings greyed out the sites settings. Unfortunatelly, the ...


0

See my answer to this question for information about pinning taskbar items via script. Short answer is that Windows stores information about pinned taskbar items with encrypted binary blobs in the registry to prevent them from being modified through scripts. Microsoft did this on purpose because their philosophy is that the taskbar should be the user's ...


1

There is no way to automate Group Policy from the command line. That's what domain controllers are for. The only thing you can do is script the registry change that the GPO would have affected. The location you observed from Process Monitor is just the copy of the GPO itself, not the application of it. The actual location in the registry you need to ...



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