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0

I am assuming even after you deleted the files, windows still maintains a cache of them, hence shown in the search results as most files are indexed by windows. What you can do here is try clearing the cache: Here is how you do it: right click on the hard-drive -> properties -> Disk Cleanup -> check recycle bin, temporary files and thumbnails and click on ...


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No built-in (DOS) way that I know of, but if you have some common "UNIX" tools available, this will work: dir /s /p Portal.sln | grep "^ Directory of" | sed -e "s/^ Directory of //" | open.pl where open.pl is: #!perl use strict; use warnings; $| = 1; if (scalar(@ARGV) == 0) { print "Please enter the file or folder path you would like to open:\n"; ...


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I know this is not the exact solution for your question, but you can always open a command prompt at a specified location by navigating to the desired location using windows explorer and then by pressing shift + right click and clicking "Open command window here". If you already knew this, please disregard this. Hope it helps.


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Tired of Windows 7 search wonders I use FileSeek http://www.fileseek.ca It has lots of options: date/size filters, regular expressions, inclusive/exclusive search, etc.


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Check your folder options. Be sure "Find partial matches" is checked. Control Panel -> Folder Options


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One of the questions asked here was about how to see whether the SearchIndexer.exe is blocked, faulting or hanging, or whether there is still progress. Also, it would be nice to see what file is currently being indexed. Here's a way to find out. Microsoft does not readily give you tools for viewing this, the log files created during search, like MSS.log ...


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Once you have added the In Folder per instructions above, start your search, once the data is populated, go to the extreme bottom of the page and click on "Try searching again in All Mail Items". The "In Folder" column will then populate.


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If you're searching by filename, I highly recommend "Everything". It searches the file listing of your NTFS drives, is super-fast, and consumes almost no resources. I now use this even when I know where the file is because it's faster than navigating the folder system. (Update: I forgot to say - install the beta. It's stable and has more features.)


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There's no way to control when indexing will occur but Windows is usually quite clever about not overloading your system while you're using it. Once the initial index is finished the overhead should be minimal. There are other search products that do allow you to specify when an index is built but I can't think of any that are free. If you're only searching ...



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