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89

If you don't want to replace the cable or install a new jack, you have a few of options: Glue it into a coupler or a short extension like one of the following (with the coupler you will need another short run of cable on the other side): Repair it with a zip tie. Use this guide for instructions: ...


16

It's entirely possible to cut off the plug and install a new one, but you will need a crimping tool. It's about $15. The thing is, your local store will probably charge you more than $15 for a cable - even if you buy it online, it'll probably be close to that when you take shipping into account. Therefore, it's cost-effective in my opinion, even if you only ...


13

In short, no. The switch should keep track of which MAC addresses can be reached on which ports, and it then only sends packets out through the correct ports. There is a limit to how many MAC addresses a switch can remember, though it's usually not an issue unless you're operating extremely large networks. Furthermore, most consumer routers are actually a ...


10

Wikipedia has pinouts for a gigabit crossover cable. Note that while Auto-MDIX is an optional feature of the gigabit ethernet specification (IEEE 802.3-2008: "Implementation of an automatic MDI/MDI-X configuration is optional for 1000BASE-T devices"), most gigabit ethernet interfaces do implement it, so in most cases you will not need a special crossover ...


6

I dont see anything in the comments suggesting that you look into udev and its rules which should install eth0. On my system, in /etc/udev/rules.d/75-network-devices.rules, I have the following; # Local network rules to name your network cards. # # These rules were generated by nethelper.sh, but you can # customize them. # # You may edit them as needed. # ...


5

Most modern computers come with an ethernet adapter that has the capability to connect to another ethernet adapter without a crossover cable. This is called Auto-MDIX. Simply connect the network interface from one computer to the network interface on the other computer. Once they're plugged in, there might be some sort of automatically-configured network ...


5

Yes, this works. In fact it's how a lot of testing of 802.11 gear gets done. There's one critical thing you're missing from your described setup, and that's sufficient RF signal attenuation so your receivers aren't completely overloaded by your transmitters. You generally need about 60 dB of attenuation between transmitter and receiver. If you have the ...


5

The bandwidth specs on your router's spec sheet are in Megabits Per Second. One byte contains eight bits. To calculate the number of Megabytes Per Second, the unit of measure you are reporting, simply divide the Megabits Per Second spec by 8. Your router only has 100Mbps ports. 100Mbps is roughly 12.5MB/s. 11MB/s of throughput (what you are getting) is very ...


5

You don't: Auto MDI-X is built into the Gigabit Ethernet spec. The endpoints will auto-negotiate and take care of those communication issues.


4

The first device under 'Other devices' is an "Ethernet controller". So it is in your list of devices. It is just not yet recognised until you install the right driver. Right click on that "Ethernet controller", select [properties] and open the tab 'Details'. Move a few centimeters down and select the property to "Hardware IDs". You now get a screen with ...


4

Your crossover cable scenario is how ICS should work. You'll just have to make sure you don't manually assign an IP address to the LAN connection on your Windows machine and let ICS do that for you, i.e. you should enable ICS on your Wireless connection and select the Wired/LAN connection as the destination and the latter's IP address should be changed for ...


4

How-To Geek has provided a nice, step-by-step tutorial on how to use your Windows 8 laptop as a wireless access point.


3

For a quick fix, I've successfully used a small piece of paper to wrap the 3 non-conductor sides of the socket and then insert the cable into the socket. Leave some paper extending outside the socket so you can prevent the plug from just pushing the paper into the socket. This hack can work for years, if there is not a lot of movement of the device or ...


3

You should be able to do this with a standard ethernet cable if you bridge the connections in network settings. This post on MSDN indicates you should be able to do it with a normal patch cable and has instructions to follow.


3

First of all, your ethernet isn't being managed by Ubuntu. Try ifconfig -a instead of just ifconfig, so you can see all your networking devices, managed or not. If you do see ethX in the ifconfig -a list, the solution should be straightforward, and you seemed to have gotten half of it. The following needs to go into your /etc/network/interfaces file: ...


3

I'll preface this by saying I've never actually tried this, but I can't see why it wouldn't work as such: Hook up the wire (since they're Gb ports, you shouldn't need a crossover cable to get Link). Configure the adapters to be on the same subnet (say 10.1.1.1 and 10.1.1.2, mask 255.255.255.0). Only one of them can/should have a gateway, and if you need to ...


2

The simple solution if it's available would be to use one of the PCs to create an ad-hoc Wifi network, and then use that to bridge the connection to the wired network. Obviously this requires a Wifi card in one of the machines you're using on the network. The Microsoft guide for doing so is here: ...


2

The signal will be fine running over cat6A or cat5e. The order of pairs and interface (RJ45 or 110 punch) are identical for both cables. The only real differences are in how the twisted pairs are arranged inside the cable for the purpose of carrying the signal. Cat5e is capable of 1Gb, but is less resistant to interference, length of run and sharp ...


2

if you got a router/switch/hub between then then yes you should get Link_LED_ON if your trying to connect them directly you probably need a differnt cable -> crossover-cable


2

Actually, I did some more poking around and found some answers myself, and it's really easy. There are two ways to do it: share the connection from Windows to Ubuntu, or from Ubuntu to Windows. Importantly, only one of these will work at a time, but doing both won't break anything. It just won't share the connection until you reverse one of them. Windows 7 ...


2

WiFi uses CISMA CA (collision avoidance) so there would be no need for a switch in such a configuration. The WiFi devices would be listening to the spectrum before sending data.... I think the only issues would be related to unanticipated resistance & power going through the wires that may reduce quality / cause issues. I would be interested to see such ...


2

I have a similar issue with Win7 wireless connectivity, occurring randomly when disconnecting from one network then connecting to a different network. The Tray icon would freeze. The Issue appears to minimize when I close any apps using the network, such as internet, external USB drives etc. Also seemed to occur less when using Task Manager open in the ...


2

You can always cut the broken end and add a crimpless plug. Here is an example. They are more expensive than a crimped end, but perfect for an emergency. Different brands/models have different capabilities such as self cutting the wires.


2

There are a few solutions available, but all will have two features in common. There will be a computer with at least 2 network interfaces e.g. ethernet and WiFi or USB (for the latter you may need a bridge adapter and specific network drivers). That computer will serve as a NAT router for the other computer(s) connecting through that. So technically you ...


1

Just get a very small hub and connect the PCs to it. I highly doubt your hall has someone monitoring port traffic. Connect the wall to the #5 port, and the two PCs to any other two ports. http://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-ProSAFE-5-Port-Ethernet-Desktop/dp/B00002EQCW I've got one of these in my AV cabinet and it works great. The only downside is it's not ...


1

If we assume that the two dedicated stacking ports are 10Gbps, the math works out exactly. 24*2 + 4*10*2 = 128Gbps


1

Good. Then you do not have DNS nameservers. Add these two lines to /etc/resolv.conf: nameserver 8.8.8.8 nameserver 8.8.4.4 and it should work.


1

I've been doing my homework and I'm going to answer my own question. The key seems to be separating my network infrastructure in to separate pieces: a router/firewall to connect to my cable modem, a gigabit switch to drive my wired home network, and wireless access points off the gigabit switch for the wireless access on my network. In doing my research I ...


1

You could try resetting the TCP/IP stack. From the above link: Open a CMD windows (run>cmd), type: netsh int ip reset c:\resetlog.txt and then reboot your PC There is also an MS Fixit link in the KB if you don't feel comfortable doing it or walking or parents through it.


1

Boot a Linux live CD/DVD (e.g. Knoppix) to see if it is working there. If it is, you likely have a software problem. Otherwise a hardware fault has to be assumed.



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