Hot answers tagged

96

If you don't want to replace the cable or install a new jack, you have a few of options: Glue it into a coupler or a short extension like one of the following (with the coupler you will need another short run of cable on the other side): Repair it with a zip tie. Use this guide for instructions: http://www.instructables.com/id/Repair-a-Broken-Ethernet-...


16

It's entirely possible to cut off the plug and install a new one, but you will need a crimping tool. It's about $15. The thing is, your local store will probably charge you more than $15 for a cable - even if you buy it online, it'll probably be close to that when you take shipping into account. Therefore, it's cost-effective in my opinion, even if you only ...


16

Your internal network will not be any slower due to the fact that all devices will communicate to each other directly (by ARPing and storing MAC addresses). You will be a little slower when you interface with the router (web administration, etc.), but that should not be noticeable. Traffic going through the router (such as going to the Internet) will be ...


15

will the network traffic be sent through the router? In short, no. The switch should keep track of which MAC addresses can be reached on which ports, and it then only sends packets out through the correct ports. There is a limit to how many MAC addresses a switch can remember, though it's usually not an issue unless you're operating extremely large ...


15

A broadcast IP ping might work – not all systems answer to it, but some do when in 169.254 mode. Try ping 169.254.255.255 (needs -b on Linux), or ping ff02::1 (needs ping6 on Linux and possibly a scope such as ff02::1%eth0). Directly sending a NetBIOS name lookup (using nbtstat -a) might work, if it runs Windows and if you know the computer name. I don't ...


13

First of all, your ethernet isn't being managed by Ubuntu. Try ifconfig -a instead of just ifconfig, so you can see all your networking devices, managed or not. If you do see ethX in the ifconfig -a list, the solution should be straightforward, and you seemed to have gotten half of it. The following needs to go into your /etc/network/interfaces file: ...


12

Wikipedia has pinouts for a gigabit crossover cable. Note that while Auto-MDIX is an optional feature of the gigabit ethernet specification (IEEE 802.3-2008: "Implementation of an automatic MDI/MDI-X configuration is optional for 1000BASE-T devices"), most gigabit ethernet interfaces do implement it, so in most cases you will not need a special crossover ...


9

Good. Then you do not have DNS nameservers. Add these two lines to /etc/resolv.conf: nameserver 8.8.8.8 nameserver 8.8.4.4 and it should work.


7

Possibly yes, it would depend on the printer software or whether the IT people installed additional software to save every printout. Some companies have programs to monitor their workers in various ways. You would never know, but you could try asking your IT department. In addition there might be some monitoring function built into the printer itself. For ...


6

The first device under 'Other devices' is an "Ethernet controller". So it is in your list of devices. It is just not yet recognised until you install the right driver. Right click on that "Ethernet controller", select [properties] and open the tab 'Details'. Move a few centimeters down and select the property to "Hardware IDs". You now get a screen with ...


6

Yes, this works. In fact it's how a lot of testing of 802.11 gear gets done. There's one critical thing you're missing from your described setup, and that's sufficient RF signal attenuation so your receivers aren't completely overloaded by your transmitters. You generally need about 60 dB of attenuation between transmitter and receiver. If you have the 3-...


6

Most modern computers come with an ethernet adapter that has the capability to connect to another ethernet adapter without a crossover cable. This is called Auto-MDIX. Simply connect the network interface from one computer to the network interface on the other computer. Once they're plugged in, there might be some sort of automatically-configured network ...


6

I dont see anything in the comments suggesting that you look into udev and its rules which should install eth0. On my system, in /etc/udev/rules.d/75-network-devices.rules, I have the following; # Local network rules to name your network cards. # # These rules were generated by nethelper.sh, but you can # customize them. # # You may edit them as needed. # (...


5

You don't: Auto MDI-X is built into the Gigabit Ethernet spec. The endpoints will auto-negotiate and take care of those communication issues.


5

The bandwidth specs on your router's spec sheet are in Megabits Per Second. One byte contains eight bits. To calculate the number of Megabytes Per Second, the unit of measure you are reporting, simply divide the Megabits Per Second spec by 8. Your router only has 100Mbps ports. 100Mbps is roughly 12.5MB/s. 11MB/s of throughput (what you are getting) is very ...


5

If you configure your machine to get an IP Address from a DHCP server, then obviously, there has to be a DHCP server in the network. Given that you use a direct cable (cross) to connect both computers to eachother, there is no DHCP server, so windows creates a fake random IP address. For this reason, it takes a long time to find each other, because there's ...


5

At the moment you connect both computers together, they will try to find a DHCP server. After some seconds the request will timeout and the computer will asign a auto-configurated address to itself. The host will then randomly assign itself a link-local ip-address and broadcasts an arp request over the network to see if its in use The above is a ...


4

Actually, I did some more poking around and found some answers myself, and it's really easy. There are two ways to do it: share the connection from Windows to Ubuntu, or from Ubuntu to Windows. Importantly, only one of these will work at a time, but doing both won't break anything. It just won't share the connection until you reverse one of them. Windows 7 ...


4

Your crossover cable scenario is how ICS should work. You'll just have to make sure you don't manually assign an IP address to the LAN connection on your Windows machine and let ICS do that for you, i.e. you should enable ICS on your Wireless connection and select the Wired/LAN connection as the destination and the latter's IP address should be changed for ...


4

How-To Geek has provided a nice, step-by-step tutorial on how to use your Windows 8 laptop as a wireless access point.


4

For a quick fix, I've successfully used a small piece of paper to wrap the 3 non-conductor sides of the socket and then insert the cable into the socket. Leave some paper extending outside the socket so you can prevent the plug from just pushing the paper into the socket. This hack can work for years, if there is not a lot of movement of the device or ...


4

The feature you are looking for is VLAN isolation. It is not a common feature in "home" routers (because few home users need VLANs, let alone know how to set them up), but my Small Business router from Cisco does have the ability to set up separate VLANs and restrict them from communicating with each other. (Specifically, it allows setting a specific VLAN to ...


3

You should be able to do this with a standard ethernet cable if you bridge the connections in network settings. This post on MSDN indicates you should be able to do it with a normal patch cable and has instructions to follow.


3

Revised, as I did not understand your question totally at first: The reason is probably because of the metric I describe below, but in your case, you want to give preference to the wireless network. You will set it's metric to 1, and the LAN to 2, and move the wireless to the top of the binding order. You should post your IPCONFIG/ALL as you have not posted ...


3

I'll preface this by saying I've never actually tried this, but I can't see why it wouldn't work as such: Hook up the wire (since they're Gb ports, you shouldn't need a crossover cable to get Link). Configure the adapters to be on the same subnet (say 10.1.1.1 and 10.1.1.2, mask 255.255.255.0). Only one of them can/should have a gateway, and if you need to ...


3

Either you have a modem or a modem/router if it's a modem/router it'll allow several PCs connected at the same time usually these have an internal ethernet switch and several RJ45 sockets, allowing you to connect up-to 4 PCs If it's a modem only you'll have to get a router or modem/router to augment or replace it, or configure one of the PCs to take over ...


3

If the second machine is completely headless, you'll want to use DCHP of some kind. Either put a router between the two systems whose status screen you can look at, or install a DHCP server application on your working computer to provide the headless system its address.


3

Try finding the setting(s) for full duplex on both end of the equipment. Some switches try very hard to auto detect full duplex and if the cable is a cross over, but fail with certain brands of NIC and sometimes different versions of the drivers (across operating systems too). Cisco for example is a prime example. I remember having a similar problem with ...


3

Even if it isn't intended, many high end printers have a hard drive where the documents are stored before they are rendered (printed). There have been many reports of documents being retrieved from second hand printers. Paranoid yet?


2

Actually, you don't even need a crossover cable. Modern year 2000-ish network cards can support switching without a crossover cable; it's all internal. Just plug-em' in and go. All of the networking will be automatically handled.



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