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Radio waves travel very fast. Since they are part of the electromagnetic spectrum, they travel at the speed of light (300,000 km per second) in space. Here on Earth, they travel slower due to the fact that when passing through an object (air, walls, small animals, large rocks, etc), they are slowed according to that object's permeability and permittivity. ...


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I think you should use the same SSIDs (customers automatically login in every store) and use unique MACs to identify the location/area the customer is in. List of consequtive SSIDs give you the most probable path through the store in 3D. Learn and explore how others did this: Cisco's CMX, Euclid Analytics, Nordstrom. Or for example this or this paper. ...


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No. You must not assign the same MAC address to multiple access points. That breaks the network and I hope your access point does not even allow it. Your best approach is to store the MAC addresses of all the access points you want to detect. As you mentioned, existing libraries and services already do it this way. Having different SSIDs for different ...


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Same thing happened to me. What I ended up doing is resetting it to factory settings and keeping DHCP open, but with a different range. If you don't mind having two routers, you can also set up WR842ND as a "Dyanmic Connection", and plug the router into the WR842ND's WAN connection. This way, you have two separate domains. Your router can be on 10.0.0.0/8, ...


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Got my new router and after setting it up I did some testing. I set the distant powerline with the garden AP up in a nearby socket, so I could easily bypass the powerline and connect the AP directly into the router. I was surprised to see that my tablet immediately connected wireless to the AP behind the powerline and I could access the internet. (I gave ...


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From what I understand of your question, you're saying the problematic AP is the one connected via powerline network adapters (officially known as HomePlug bridges). In my own experience, this simply doesn't work. You will find that connecting a device (e.g. a laptop) to the powerline adapter works fine. You will find replacing the powerline adapters with ...


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I was not able to comment, but you might want to look at Radio Antenna Design and their Signal Radiation Patterns. It will show variety, shape, direction and intensity of ENERGY LOBES that are formed by various antenna. Wish I had more time to share a full answer, but I care that you head in the right direction versus points. PS: I tried to comment but was ...


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Some things to consider: The wireless access point (WAP) receive side has one obstacle the transmit does not, and that is receive noise. The received signal will have a certain signal to noise ratio, i.e. how much above the noise the signal strength will be in db. The "gain" antenna can pick up more noise, especially if there is a "noise source" in the path ...


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What would cause it to crash? A bug in the AP-mode support in the driver of your AP's Wi-Fi chipset. Well, the driver, or the chipset firmware, or potentially in the hardware of the chipset itself. If you have access to the sources of said driver to try and debug it, I'd start by looking at how it handles multicast delivery when clients have invoked 802.11 ...


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It could be that as the device reaches the edge of the range, the usb adapter starts requesting more power than the Pi can provide, and thus lead to instability. This would make sense as far as only affecting TCP traffic which requires a response, while the UDP traffic could never reach the target and simply be discarded, without causing any issues. I am ...


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Hopefully this helps anyone in this situation. I pretty much came to the conclusion that the MAC on the printer model itself is not compatible with the AP. I have tried several different printers (All the same make and model) and none of them worked on that access point for more than about 10 minutes on average. When applying MAC filtering and manually ...


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You need at least as much antennae as you have streams. Besides, even with single stream more antennae can help in case of poor signal/noise ratio. Regarding your examples: Probably typo in description. One dual band antenna + one 2.4GHz + one 5GHz; so up to two antennae for each band 2 antennae for 2.4GHz band and 3 for 5GHz. Professional/enterprise ...


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The antenna changes the shape of the transmission. The electrical signal doesn't get more powerful, but less is wasted in transmission in directions which aren't useful (e.g., up and down). Similarly with reception, the signals are received from a more narrow field, this strengthens reception and reduces interference. It's similar to talking through a ...


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"High gain antennas" provide gain on both transmit and receive. So, with such an antenna at only one end, you'll get more range than with a standard antenna at each end, but less than with a high gain antenna at both ends.



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