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6

Any device with even rudimentary 802.11 Access Point (AP) functionality would be a fine choice here. Note that almost all products sold as "wireless routers" have this functionality even if they don't call it out on those terms. In some cases, you can turn off NAT and DHCP services on the wireless router, and their WAN port ends up getting bridged in with ...


5

A wireless repeater is slower for those connecting to the network using it. This is because it uses the same radio to accept incoming and outgoing packets from clients as it does to forward those packets on to the next wifi router and accept replies. So effectively you get half the bandwidth, as each packet must go over the air twice - from the client to ...


4

The advances of using a wireless bridge is that you don't have to worry about it after the initial setup. i.e. don't need drivers and can attach multiple devices to it. If you want to go Extreme, you can configure a Linksys WRT54GL using DD-WRT as an wireless bridge. old link | newer instructions The disadvantages of this setup is that it is a fixed ...


4

Traditional "WDS" wireless links between wireless infrastructure devices require a bunch of manual setup, because the WDS-related sections of the 802.11 spec never specified an autonegotiation mechanism for WDS links. Put both devices on the same channel so they can talk to each other. Put the devices within range of each other. In the WDS configuration of ...


4

Do NOT bridge the network connections. Assuming the laptop is some flavour of Windows, the option you are looking for is "Share this internet connection" or something similar. It will be in properties of the connection probably. If you update your question to include the operating system of her laptop then I should be able to give a little more help. ...


3

yes, you want to use "repeater" mode. if your router does not support Repeater mode then take a look at DDWRT - which is free open source firmware. you only need this on the one router. so your first WRT54GC with WAN would be regular wireless/router. your second WRT54GC would be a Repeater (don't even need a cable) hope this helps. EDIT: link. ...


3

You are going to be looking for Point to Point Ethernet bridges. Some use regular WiFi, microwave, laser, etc. You could also use some cheap WAPs and configure them to be bridges. I like to load third party firmware when doing such things as its more configurable.


3

I've spent quite some time recently looking into this problem. There are two topics to consider: What kind of WiFi network does a client see when they try to connect? How do all the routers, access points, repeaters, switches, etc. talk to each other? Let's start with topic 1: There seem to be three options: Assign a different SSID to each access ...


3

All 802.11n AirPort base stations (by this I mean Extremes, Expresses, and Time Capsules) can share their USB ports while extending the network from any other Apple AirPort base station. Note that Expresses only support USB printer sharing (not USB hard drives). Extremes and Time Capsules support sharing both USB printers and USB hard drives. Whoever told ...


3

Most Access Points are suitable for you! Just configure them as "Client", and connect the AP to the device with a crossover cable. Example with linksys: Linksys KB


2

What you are looking for is a Wireless Bridge. A device such as this Netgear connects as a client to your existing Wireless Adapter and acts as a bridge to the ethernet cabled device. There are a lot of different makes and models and some are called wireless game adapters for consoles that only had ethernet such as the earlier Xbox 360s.


2

1. Factory reset First factory reset the WL-330 device. Go to the WL-330 web admin interface, tab "Toolbox" -> tab "Back-up" -> label "Restore to Factory default" choose the [ Reset ] button. In case you can't access the web admin interface, you can also press the "Reset" button (on the rear panel of the device) and hold for 10 seconds to restore all ...


2

You are most probably running the netgear in mixed mode G/N. If that is the case, it may be that the tplink repeater cannot run in mixed mode and broadcasts the signal in N-mode only, which is why the WRT54GL can connect to the Netgear but not to the repeater (since the wrt54g is B/G only). If you want to use the linksys, try running everything in pure G ...


2

Yes the only way to connect them together is with a cable if they will not be compatible with each other for wireless bridging. You will need to do the following: Turn OFF DHCP Server on the B683, once they are connected together the B970b will do all the DHCP work Make sure the IP address for the B683 is in the same range as the network for the B970b and ...


2

DD-WRT will fix all those limitations you speak of. Here's a diagram of how it works: Here are the details of the wireless bridging with dd-wrt.


2

Windows 7 has built in functionality for bridging connections. This page explains bridging and Internet Connection Sharing. Here is another Microsoft article on the subject.


2

It is possible, but not with your dongle. You need a portable wireless access point/bridge/ethernet adapter that will connect your client plug-and-play to your network. Basically a bridge connects to a pre-configured wireless network and connects the client by ethernet. An example of a Portable Wireless Ethernet Adapter is the Asus WL-330, but I imagine ...


2

See if this helps http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/how-to-turn-an-old-router-into-a-wireless-bridge/


2

It's configured as an AP client. Sounds like the AP client is working as expected, except that you have clouded the picture by introducing a switch and two other hosts. The "AP client" is supposed to support only one (wired) host. You cannot use a switch to expand the backend of the AP431W configured as an AP client. Perhaps a (wired) router instead ...


2

A WiFi adapter like the Netgear WNCE2001 is also called an access point operating in client mode. Typically the AP can only support one client device on the wired end, so a switch cannot be connected. A wireless router (or an AP with routing features) operating in wireless bridge mode will provide the functionality you're asking for. You may have to use ...


2

the WNCE2001 DOES indeed act like a bridge as I have it connected to a 24 port switch (via WIFI) Works like a charm. It does work, just not stated officially anywhere


2

Yes, all domestic wifi routers will bridge the wifi interface and switch ports so they are the same network. To use the netgear as an AP on your network, you just need to plug one of the LAN ports on the Netgear into a LAN port on the existing router Make sure you disable DHCP on the netgear, and give it an IP address that makes sense on your existing ...


2

Well, pretty much the solution to try is to find the jtag port, make a jtag cable connecting a router to a parallel , and use that to debrick the system. You will also need the software from here. The software is windows only, and you'll need a system with a serial port (probably a desktop) to fix this.


1

If both routers support WDS, that's definitely the way to do it. You can't set up the router as an AP client because a client can only connect a single device. Make sure to disable the DHCP server on the router you're using as a switch. Also, don't connect its Internet/WAN port to anything.


1

I would see if your N300 supports DD-WRT (I think it does; I have the N450 which supports it fully), and then configure the wireless into "Client Bridge" mode. You are wanting to make a wireless bridge, so you're correct there. Once you have the client bridge set up, you'll want to make sure DHCP is disabled on the N300, and of course, remember that only the ...


1

While the premise of #2 doesn't appear to have any foundation, this is how I would do what you are after. Get two dual-band 802.11n DD-WRT compatible access-points (such as a linksys). These come with 2.4ghz and 5ghz radios. Decide on one frequency for the APs to connect to each other, and the other for users to connect. So lets say you use 2.4ghz for ...


1

4500 doesn't support WDS mode PRODUCT WDS Feature WNDR3300 YES WNR3500 YES WNR834Bv2 YES DG834Gv3 YES DG834Gv4 YES WNHDE111 YES


1

If this device is a wireless bridge, you can connect whatever device you like to it, even a switch (and other devices to the switch). If you need vlan-tagging or multicast you may run into some problems, but most likely you don't need those features at home (exception: IPTV).


1

From what I know, this is impossible to achieve with only two devices. Just to clarify: you have two separate internet connections in your house 3G connection (wifi network1) ADSL connection (wifi network2) lets suppose you're using a laptop inside your house. You want to be able to connect to _either_ of a 3G connection or to ADSL connection from your ...


1

You are in the right way, a cheap bridge router (possibly with 2 antennas) and an external amplified antenna connected in place of one of the antennas should do the work fine if you already can connect without anything special even if the connection is not good. Just be sure the router can be used in bridge mode for wifi. PS: In Stack Exchange sites, ...



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