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17

This is a common problem without a simple solution, assuming you're trying to monitor every device from a central location. You can't monitor these kinds of stats from a single PC, you need to get in the middle of everything, your router. I've been in similar situations with bandwidth-hogging roommates, I was able to flash my router with the Toastman ...


9

There's these pesky things called "Physics" and "Legal regulation of power and frequency bands" The amount of power needed to transmit follows something called the inverse square law - transmission power doubles with distance. You could, in theory, use highly directional antennae on either end (which are more efficient since you arn't blasting signal ...


8

You want to look for "captive portal" solutions, where all connectivity is blocked except maybe DNS, and all HTTP attempts are redirected to your web page. Then design your captive portal web page so that you don't get the UI to accept the terms until after the video has played. Set a 30 minute timeout for the sessions, so that every 30 minutes the user ...


3

you would need a directional antenna at each site, this is assuming you could achieve LOS (line of site). There are various sites that can give you an idea of what hardware you will need and how much you need to boost the signal. You could try searching for "long range wifi directional antenna" Example here.


2

A little bit easier approach than flashing your router might be to use an old PC/Laptop or similar as an Proxy. It isn't so hard to set up some software and route all your traffic through that PC as a standard-gateway, then it should be easy to record detailed stats!


2

I remember when you first asked this question, but I finally got around to figuring it out. Hope it's still of use to you or someone else! You can access the this data by calling the GetLocalUsage method of ConnectionProfile objects, which are WLAN/WAN connections (i.e. SSIDs). GetLocalUsage takes two DateTime parameters and returns a DataUsage object ...


2

Interesting that you mention hotels. I have been to a lot of hotels where they have a different SSID for the different areas and I have been to several that have a seamless wireless network. Either way works. The seamless seems a little more professional to me but that is simply a matter of opinion. When you draw out your coverage map, overlap your wireless ...


2

Launch Hyper-V Manager from your App Menu In the Actions area in right-hand navigation, click “Virtual Switch Manager” When the Virtual Switch Manager window opens, select “New virtual network switch” on the left, select “Internal” on the right, and then click the “Create Virtual Switch” button Give the new switch a name like “Virtual WLAN” and click “OK” ...


1

This is how you can connect your printer WITHOUT installing any bloatware 1) Connect Up Plug the printer into the wall and into your router via a network cable. Connect your computer to the same network (wireless or wired, it doesn't matter) 2) Restore Factory Defaults (If you're like me, you messed everything up and needed to reset) Turn Printer Off ...


1

USB bluetooth dongles are usually written for Windows only, sometimes with Mac support and rarely with Linux support. But Linux ones exist nonetheless. Wifi dongle not required unless you actually have a wireless modem to connect to. If you have a wireless modem/router, you can use both wired network cable for the desktop and wireless network for the ...


1

You can get a wireless USB network adapter for less than £10 on Amazon. You can set it up as a hotspot and share your wired internet connection with your phone/tablet. I advise using Wifi over Bluetooth because you'll get a better range with your Wifi.


1

There's two options - some phones support reverse tethering, but not all phones support it. In many cases you need root, and your phone is tied into the router. Alternately you can use the lovely hostapd to do this. You'll be using a slightly unusual setup here since we're bridging our AP to the other router, rather than running a whole seperate network. ...


1

Roaming is unfortunately up to the client device and is mostly non-standardized. Some devices will roam 'better' than others and support different roaming protocols. For example, take a look at the iPhone's roaming capabilities on enterprise networks. Cisco has their own solutions regarding wireless roaming. If your client devices don't roam well on ...


1

Does the microSD card required? No. What is it used for? Is it required for the Internet connection or just a feature so I can store data on it? Yes, exactly! [EDITED] Just a feature to store data on it, not required for connection. Every USB - Modem has a small Flash memory to store the driver needed for Windows / MacOS installation. That is ...


1

I would first recommend isolating which side of the access is truly dropping (or both). Clients (and by clients I mean your servers, desktops/laptops, etc.) should be able to connect to your internal network and the router, even if you are unable to access the internet. If this is the case then you have at least isolated the issue is between the router and ...


1

I am not a network specialist, but I would throw out two things to look at. You seem to be using POE devices. I've seen something similar happen at a hospital and it was due to the two areas not sharing a common ground. The ground was described as "floating" and zero voltage at one side of the campus was higher than the other. Power as a result flowed ...


1

You need a router that will combine the multiple WAN connections - well, really, share the multiple WAN connections - they cannot actually be "Combined" unless your provider gives a way to "Bond" them - essentially meaning that you can get an aggregate (3x the top speed of each) but you can't get more than (the top speed of each) for any individual ...


1

The only "Special" requirement is the domain controller will need to be the DNS server for your other 3 computers. What this will likely require is one of two setups: Turning off DHCP on your router and also turning on the DHCP server on your domain controller then configuring it to give out your router as the "Default Gateway" If it is configurable (and ...



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