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Click Start. Click Settings. Click Network & Internet. Click Wi-Fi. Click Manage Wi-Fi Settings. Scroll down to "Manage known networks" Click the network you want to forget. Click Forget. Picture source, and more info


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The answer is "It depends, but probably not". If by WIFI you mean "Internet Access", and they don't have Internet themselves, the answer is "No". Briefly speaking, there is equipment on the other end which needs to be enabled on a per line basis - it will not be enabled on their line. If they already have Internet, but no WIFI then * If they use the same ...


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If you have a network and want those connected to the network to autoconfigure, you probably want to set up a DHCP, which assigns IP addresses to the clients. In addition to simply assigning IP addresses, the DHCP protocol can also transfer information about which DNS servers to use. So you probably have computer X in your network that has your website. On ...


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If you’re going to run a DNS service, you might as well move the DHCP service away from the router, too. That way, no manual client-side configuration is required. I recommend using Dnsmasq, an all-in-one solution for SOHO networks. It provides both DHCP and DNS services and is very easy to set up. It requires very little resources, so you could run it on a ...


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I personally use powerDNS to do similar things to this on my own network. It runs on a linux (debian) based pc that is on all the time and servers as my local network's dns server as well as other functions (e.g. file server). Then on my router I configured a firewall rule that allowed outgoing dns traffic from my dns server pc but redirect all other ...


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Open a Command Prompt with Admin privileges (on Windows 10, right click Start button and choose "Command Prompt (Admin)") and execute this command: netcfg -d That net config command will output info like this: SetupDiCallClassInstaller Error: 0x6 ... Successfully commited changes to the registry. We are going to reboot now to complete the ...


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I have double-checked route print and it indicates that wired does, in fact, have a higher metric than wireless. netsh int ipv4 show interfaces also confirms this. However, I do note that the wireless index is 11, whereas the gigabit NIC's index is 18. Not sure if this would be the cause, but I also cannot figure out how to change these numbers. The lower ...


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Ok, this is an issue I've seen in my shop a few times since Win10 release -- Wireless worked fine with previous OS. After Win10 upgrade the wireless is iffy: Sometimes works great, sometimes cuts off randomly, sometimes not at all. LAN connections work fine. 95% of the computers I've experienced the issue had wireless + bluetooth cards. Not sure if its just ...


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Looks like this could be caused by an SMB3 signing default change introduced in OS X 10.11.5. It can be overridden by adding or modifying a file in your /etc directory. See the thread El Capitan 10.11.5 update SMB slow (bug) in the Apple support community for the whole story.



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