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Now I’m wondering, can I just put back everything and try to turn on the laptop again? You should be able to run the system without a component like that installed. As far as the computer is considered, a device like that is a PCI card and a non-critical component that either exists or doesn’t. That said, you say this: I’m a bit scared because of ...


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No, if your PC has no wifi-card and you don't have a wifi-usb-stick or an access point at hand, there is no chance for you to get your laptop connected to wifi. But, you can use your PC that is connected via ethernet to your router to change your settings so router enables a wifi, that your laptop can connect to - if your router has wifi-support.


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Could you please advise how can I know exactly if my Asus’s Wi-Fi is 802.11n-compatible? Go to the web page for the manufacturer and check. You'll see that it is 802.11n-compatible. You can also tell by your image -- a device that can't support 802.11n wouldn't have any settings for AdHoc 11n.


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ARP will only list address that are on the same subnet as your computer. To do what you want you might want to use nmap to check all computers that are connected to a certain network. Or If all your devices are configured via DHCP—yes, DHCP can serve multiple subnets, depending on the DHCP server that is being used—you might check the DHCP leases file. ...


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From your system, there will not be a way to do so. That could be done from the router that's housing said subnets. Your computer will never be aware that it is even a part of a subnet, if there is one. Therefore, your show ARP will only show information within your subnet.


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Your computer only needs to track ARP entries for computers on the same subnet. For all other computers, it goes through a router to get there. The router stores arp entries for all devices that it knows about. That being said, if your computer is connected to multiple subnets (usually by using multiple NICs or multiple VLANs one one NIC) , then it will ...


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There are four possible situations: Your printer establishes a network connection and acts as a gateway. You should have a new interface listed by ifconfig (typically usb0), and your printer's address should be available in /proc/net/route Your printer establishes a network connection and lets your computer configure it via DHCP. You should have a new ...


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Some Unix commands are designed to run indefinitely until stopped with Ctrl-C.


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It is perhaps a bit late, but I have only just started using Reaver. This error message usually occurs because the Wi-Fi signal is too weak. Reaver tries to connect multiple times while it is running, and if the signal is too weak on one of those connects, you get that error message. For Reaver to work properly, the signal needs to be really strong and ...


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Perhaps narrow the scan by a single port (like tcp 80) on all the private subnets. Other ports that may be open are udp 67, 68, tcp 443, 53 (tcp/udp) nmap -p 80 -Pn -n -T5 10.0.0.0/8 It will scan quicker if you limit it to one or two ports. If it's bricked, you may need serial access to fix it.


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I don’t see any problems with that. You might want to wrap the antenna connectors in tape or even tape them down somewhere so they don’t touch any circuitry. Other than that, there shouldn’t be any problems.


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I am presuming you will use your own wifi routers, First thing first you will need about 6-15 APs. Exact number will depend on the make and width of the walls in your hostel and the kind of APs you use. You will need a SIP server (lookup http://www.asterisk.org/) to authenticate and manage users and then VoIP clients on the phone and laptop for the users ...


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Computers behind a router are on the router's LAN (local area network) side, and the modem is on the router's WAN (wide area network) side, so they are separate networks, and the modem would not have a 192.168.x.x IP address, since it's not local. You need to connect to your router's configuration website and see what it says is the modem's IP address.


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Are the computers behind the router NAT? Are the computers on wifi or wired? Do they have static IPs? One possible cause might be "client isolation". Most wifi routers support "wireless isolation" or "client isolation" as a form of security feature. This makes all wifi clients that connect to the router not see any other clients on the network. Check that ...


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By default Kali does not manage your wireless interfaces using the network-manager, leaving your wireless interface for what Kali does best: pen testing. If you want to manage your wireless interface, you can resort to iwconfig or add your wireless interface to the Network-Manager. To do the latter, open the following file in an editor: ...


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According to this question and answer thread on the “Unix & Linux Stack Exchange” you can only get a list of installed printers via lpstat -s or using it with sudo (sudo lpstat -s) to get a full device path. Or maybe using nmap -A? All that said, perhaps using arp with grep and sed chained together with pipes (|) can work like this: arp -a | grep ...


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This is indeed a strange one. Officially, if you connect two devices of the same layer you must use a crossover cable. Most devices will auto-detect this and it will work anyway, but in some rare cases they won't. Note that the WAN part of the router is considered L3 while the LAN part is usually considered L2 in home routers. So if you connect Router-2-Wan ...


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I would look at the copper grade, pinout, and twisted-pair pairings of the in-wall wiring. It could be that you have a defect in your wiring that your computer's NIC is able to deal with, but your router B isn't able to. I'd also look at which port you're using on Router B. The computer's NIC may do auto-crossover (auto MDI-X), but maybe your router ...


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The first router is being used as a router, and the second router is being used as a Wireless Access Point (AP) - it doesn't need to be a router, as it resides on the same network as the first router. Connect the AP router to the first router via LAN ports. Turn off DHCP on the AP router. Now all the LAN ports both routers, and the wifi network on the AP ...



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