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8

You can't: And it's simply, IEEE 802.11 and variants work in Layer 2 and Layer 1 in the OSI Model. To be able to discover another host using UDP datagrams, TCP packets, or even ICMP, you need third-layer connectivity.


2

Your Router is appearing to be also a Caching DNS server (which is common these days ) once in the cache the subsequent queries (within a few hours to few days normally --depending on settings) is only needing to ask the router not go through the whole song and dance of contacting router then local ISP then possibly a more famous one like google ...


2

Apple support cleared this up for me. I needed to clear out all wifi networks saved under the preferred networks tab Networks>Advanced>Preferred Wifi Networks - with the exception of the network created to login to our secure office environment. Turns out I had a bunch based on travel, and there may have been one or two my machine favored for some ...


2

Knowing that some routers do not support non-ascii SSID names, I remark that Linux software usually supports UTF-8 rather than Unicode. To be using Unicode, I assume therefore that your computer has Windows. You should be able to hack into the router, but speak to your ISP about getting the firmware upgraded before hacking. You should be able to use telnet ...


2

If the two routers are connected through cable the answer is almost no (you pay a little overhead). But you don't need another router, an access point (or a repeater) is a better choice. Note: you must choose a different non-overlapping wireless channel for the 2nd router. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels


2

Will it decrease your speed? Yes. Will it decrease your speed noticeably? No. Local network connections and routing are fast enough that they won't add a significant overhead.


1

Most 5GHz routers can broadcast on both the 5GHz and 2.4GHz frequencies simultaneously. Check your wireless router manual. This is often called “Simultaneous Dual Band”, or “Dual Band Concurrent”.


1

Can I make my older devices see the 5GHz band? No. Because your older devices are using hardware that only can connect to 2.4GHz 802.11 networks. You also cannot purchase USB 802.11 devices for phones and smart TVs. Maybe by buying a 5 GHz wireless USB adapter for the TV and the Android box? If you willing to buy hardware. The simplest solution ...


1

To achieve this, the router on the second network needs to be configured to deliver IP addresses in the same subnet as the 4G router. The easiest thing is to set the DHCP settings of the router to deliver IP addresses in an unused part of the network the the 4G router uses AND sets the default gateway to the 4G router and not itself. You will also need to ...


1

If you're trying to get whole-home coverage using a single router configured as a router and two additional routers configured as access points, here's what you do: 1) There should be a setting that you set on each of the routers that enable to to designate the router as an APs. Enable this on your two additional routers. 2) Make sure all three routers ...


1

I just checked with my support department at PureVPN and they told me that Android OS has a limitation that it cannot make a VPN hotspot. Sorry :(



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