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4

Your proposal won't work, for several reasons: Wi-Fi products use 50Ω coax for their antenna cables, whereas home CATV/TV antenna coax cable is 75Ω (RG-6, RG-59). So you'd have an impedance mismatch unless you put impedance converters at both ends. Wi-Fi uses 2.4GHz and 5GHz frequencies, and requires coax cable designed for low signal loss per unit of ...


3

This is no different than connecting 2 wired Ethernet ports on the same computer to the same network... it requires what is called interface bonding, NIC teaming, or link aggregation, which is only officially supported by Windows Server OS for Microsoft products (it worked in Windows 10 up to build 10240, officially broken now), but this also requires a ...


2

You would benefit from a professional. Here is a possible design, which may explain why I say that. Someone who's done this before would better know about cutting corners either from necessity or budget. Implement AQM on a router (which is upstream of all devices) This prevents lag during use aka bufferbloat. It's a widespread, ongoing problem, it can ...


2

I suggest enabling the WDS Bridging feature. (See TP-Link N600 Wireless Dual Band manual, page 43 and page 44.) As fideli's comment indicates, you're likely best off using just one subnet, and I think you may also be best off using one SSID (matching all other routers). Regarding Jonno's comment, it is true that there is some danger about having more ...


2

DD-WRT will do just fine using Client Bridge on second one. Use the same net mask on both routers. Set router 1 as gateway for router 2, on router 2 enable DHCP relay.. You can actually use non DD-WRT routers, preferably two of the same that have bridge functionality, most that can work as repeaters can do the job, try most TP-Link models ( activate WDS ...


2

As your network is behind NAT, you won't be able to use a standard PING to each device. The ping utility sends ICMP requests, which will be responded to by a single device when sent to a WAN IP address, usually your NAT gateway (in this case your WiFi router I believe). This is the intended behaviour, and is one of the fundamental security aspects of NAT, ...


2

The repeater is the problem. By repeating you essentially halve the effective speed. No repeater: Send a packet Acknowledgment of receipt Repeater: Send a packet Resend the packet Acknowledgment of receipt Re-Acknowledgment of receipt All that extra work congests the network. Wifi is a shared medium so only one device can transmit at a time. What you ...


2

This happens because packets sent wirelessly are more likely to arrive corrupted, so your computer asks the router to send those packets again, and that decreases your speed. The faster your connection is, more pockets will be lost in the way because more are sent. I cannot recommend any specific settings/configuration that will increase your speed, because ...


1

If you're using the same SSID and password as before with the same security settings, then they'll carry on using the same credentials without a problem. Depending on your OS, you can remove the credentials they are remembering to make sure the security is working correctly. Some links to the most used OS's here: Remove remembered wireless networks in ...


1

Long answer: If by "access the Internet through my router at home" you mean, "When I am travelling and I access the Internet somewhere that blocks some content, can I bypass the content blocking by connecting to my home router and then using my (unblocked) home Internet connection to access that content", the answer is: It's possible by tricky. The easiest ...


1

The steps you need to take are: Make sure TP units are connected via LAN not WAN port. Disable DHCP on both TP units Assign the TPs static IPs within the range of the Actiontec, eg 192.168.0.250 and 192.168.0.251 (Currently they are conflicting) Replicate the SSID across all 3, but use different channels (eg CH1, CH6, C11) Devices will then all "see" ...


1

If I had to make a bet based on the information provided, the answer is probably no, it will not help. Here is why: 1) Assuming your users are not particularly distant from the access point, and there are not lots of thing which could be interfering, you should get a reasonable signal for most things. 2) If things worked fine until you got a desktop (which ...


1

The basic steps to use a WiFi router as an access point are always the same: Disable DHCP Make sure the new router’s IP address doesn’t conflict with anything on your existing network, yet is in the same subnet, so you can access its web interface Set your wireless configuration to be identical to the network you’re trying to extend/replace Connect the new ...


1

The simplest and likely the fastest setup here would be to bridge your Cisco and allow the C7 to perform all network functions and provide your wireless access. Assuming they are physically in the same location (not one in the basement and one in the attic). If they are separate, use AP mode on the C7 or manually configure it as an AP if it doesnt have ...


1

When connected to wired ethernet, I get a full 100 Mbps connection. Ok, that is normal. Wired Ethernet is usually 10, 100 or 1000 Mbps and you either get that speed or no connection at all. through Wifi I end up getting 70 Mbps and it seems like the speed decreases when I am away from the router This is also normal. Wireless speeds decrease ...


1

Your setup is not a wireless bridge, just a way of using the wireless medium to carry a network connection to another router, the second "router" should be setup as a bridge to pass-thru all network traffic, making this all one subnet with one router handling all DHCP and routing functions for the entire LAN. This is called a Client-Bridge configuration and ...


1

Microsoft's solution in Windows 10, NIC Teaming (LBFO), is not useful, as the documentation says: NICs representing technologies other than Ethernet are not supported in teams (e.g., WWAN, WLAN/WiFi, Bluetooth, Infiniband including IPoIB NICs). For wireless, the Microsoft solution is therefore out. In any case, one other unfulfilled requirement is ...


1

If you want to use your connection as a profit generator you need to invest in making it viable as such. Regular residential equipment will not suffice, and if you have a slower connection it may not be suitable for many users. The way to do this would be: Port Security: a managed switch will allow you to register one device per port and nothing else can ...



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