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7

> What exactly is the criteria for "ASCII-encoded" here? Just that they must be 8-bit chars with the high bit unset? Are non-printable characters allowed? Wikipedia's Wi-Fi Protected Access says the WPA-PSK passphrase is 8 to 63 printable ASCII characters, and includes this reference as a footnote: Each character in the pass-phrase must have an encoding ...


7

WPA (and WPA2) encrypts traffic below the level that Wireshark or similar tools capture. Those tools capture at the operating system's socket interface, not at the level of the actual network media. When you send a packet over WPA-protected WiFi, the WPA encryption isn't added until the last moment before the data is broadcast. There might still be other ...


6

Most likely no. Processor affinity will only restrict programs from using the non-selected cores, so that program will only recieve less timeslices than it could possibly get on multiple cores. Furthermore, taking a quick glance on pyrit shows performance metrics along with different graphics card models. This tells me that pyrit's performance is bound by ...


6

WPA2 provides AES encryption on your data. The key for this encryption is generated for each session and has no relationship to your passphrase. Your passphrase is really only used for authentication. Your passphrase will have no affect on your performance. Source


6

Your question as posted in the title is not worth answering IMO, because I suspect it's one roundabout attempt to solve the root problem that just begets more unsolved problems. I can't connect to this module via serial port to configure ... Can you connect to this module through its serial port from a PC? If you cannot communicate with this module ...


4

RADIUS is the better option provided secure (ie long) passwords / passphrases are used and a sensible lock out policy is in place. The main reason for this is that for RADIUS, you need to interact with an authentication service to test a password, and so once you are locked out, that is the end of your attempt to breach. With PSK, all you need to do is ...


3

Sure, probably the best known being Wireshark. It's free too!


3

WirelessKeyView should work.


2

You could try explaining to your network admins that hiding the ssid is pointless as this site explains http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/tutorials/article.php/3576541


2

Update for Windows XP (KB893357) This update to Windows XP provides support for Wi-Fi Protected Access 2 (WPA2), which is the latest standards-based wireless security solution derived from the IEEE 802.11i standard.


2

WinXP SP3 already contains the update adding WPA2 support to the operating system (refer to List of fixes that are included in Windows XP Service Pack 3, details can be found in "Description of the Wireless Client Update for Windows XP with Service Pack 2"). However you also need drivers supporting WPA2. For some old chipsets there are no drivers available ...


2

I had similar situation. It turned out that for some reason Ubuntu for Wireless-N network does see 2 ESSIDs with the same name but supporting different authentication methods. One of them supports WEP options and the other supports WPA option. It is not clear from the menu which one to choose, so you need to try one until you pick the right one.


2

Unfortunately for you, WPA2-PSK authentication is bi-directional, meaning that both the client and the AP have to know the same key or the authentication fails. If the AP doesn't know the same key as the client, the math just doesn't work out, and no communication is possible. So there's no way to do what you're asking. Update for clarity: The AP doesn't ...


2

WPA uses a nonce (random number used just for this session) to provide freshness (so the same key isn't used every time). Unlike WEP, the messages for different hosts are encrypted using a different key. Your iPad is using a completely different key from your laptop to en/decrypt the packets (these keys are generated from the permanent master key and other ...


2

In case its of any use to anyone else using these boards... I initially had issues with some UART Wifi boards (marketed as TLG10UA03), because they wouldn't communicate via RS232 at all, and I suspected that either I'd damaged them by applying the wrong RS232 voltage or they were faulty. However I found I was able to login on wifi with username admin and ...


2

This seems to be a Windows bug when selecting WPA2-PSK immediately after Open was selected. The workaround is to first choose one of the other options and then to choose WPA2-PSK.


2

Promiscuous mode is an Ethernet-level concept that should allow you to see other devices' data frames, but data frames are just one of several types of 802.11 frames. To see the other kinds of 802.11 frames (management, control, etc.), and possibly to see 802.11 headers, you need to use what's known as 802.11 Monitor Mode. Then again, the EAPOL-Key frames ...


2

What WPA-Personal (aka WPA-PSK) does is encrypt the packets that go on the air, so that people who aren't connected to this network can't read your messages (and WEP did the same in this respect, by the way, it just did it in a different way, which suffered from a serious hole). It additionally tries to make it difficult/impossible to connect to the network ...


1

Something has definitely gone awry with the configuration on either your router or your laptop. I have seen this before and after several hours of tinkering, the only thing that seemed to help was to completely reset the wireless router, and reinstall the wireless adapter on the computer. As far as "reinstalling" the wireless adapter on the computer, I'm ...


1

You need to specifically capture the EAPOL handshake of the session you want to decrypt. You cannot capture the handshake of one device and then decrypt the traffic of another device. So my guess is that when you can decrypt traffic from your laptop but not from the iPad then Wireshark only captured the fourway handshake of the laptop.


1

According to my experience, the module can be restored to its original factory state by doing this: Be sure the module accepts AT+ commands by sending +++ and receiving +OK. If not, keep shorting pins 2 and 5 while restarting the module, to force command mode. With the module in command mode, send AT+RSTF to reset the module to factory settings. The module ...


1

Module has no obvious ROM on it. I'd guess that with reset attempts you cleared MAC address and you need to program it back.


1

Adding the Wi-Fi network manually in Control Pane > Network and Sharing Center > Manage Wireless Networks seems to fix the problem.


1

From http://www.xs4all.nl/~rjoris/wpapsk.html - "WPA key calculation - From passphrase to hexadecimal key Details of the Calculation": For WPA-PSK encryption, the binary key is derived from the passphrase according to the following formula: The function PBKDF2 is a standardized method to derive a key from a passphrase. It is specified in RFC2898 ...


1

in wpa_supplican.conf, write as below. remove all.... network={ ssid="SMC" key_mgmt=WPA-PSK proto=RSN pairwise=CCMP group=TKIP psk="secret passphrase" } use wpa_passphrase for psk generation. You will get one kill. put psk="that key" Then run with this command wpa_supplicant -Dwext -i wlan0 -c /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf -dd change driver and ...


1

I think the easiest way to do this to put the interface in monitor mode, then use wireshark. In wireshark, enable the wireless toolbar (View menu) and select Wireshark as the decryptor. Then click decryption keys, and select WPA-PWD seeing as you have the passphrase, and enter it along with your SSID. Then start capturing. Note that to decrypt other ...


1

If the thread Getting Atheros AR5212 Wireless Cards to Work with Windows XP relates to your problem, then the solution there was to use the AWLC4030 Driver v4.0.0.1733.


1

You probably have neighbours nearby with wireless routers all using the same channel (most routers default to channel 6). Try switching to a different channel (to use different frequencies) and see if that helps.   Network Stumbler   http://www.netstumbler.com/ You can use Network Stumbler to find out what channels all the wireless routers in ...


1

"If ASCII characters are used, the 256 bit key is calculated by applying the PBKDF2 key derivation function to the passphrase, using the SSID as the salt and 4096 iterations of HMAC-SHA1" The actual protecting codes have set sizes. Wikipedia


1

I had the same issue, and reinstalling network drivers (from the manufacturer's website, eg. broadcom or intel) allowed me to connect to my WPA2 network.



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