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0

Since this is Windows, simply use bin\myprogram.exe instead.


0

In some version of Cygwin the Zip command has bug a which cause the -j option fail when Win32 paths are specified, So convert to POSIX paths and try this code... c:\apps\cygwin\bin\zip.exe -j "/cygdrive/d/ZipMe/TestZip/subdir1/random.zip" "/cygdrive/d/ZipMe/TestZip/subdir1/random.text". Thanks.


0

The problem is solved by removing \ at the back. "c:\Program Files\WinRAR\WinRAR.exe" a -afzip "e:\output.zip" "e:\foldertozip"


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Use the -r recurse subfolders switch. Source Using the WinRAR Command-line tools in Windows Examples to compress a folder rar a -r yourfiles.rar *.txt c:\yourfolder creates archive yourfiles.rar and compresses all .txt files in c:\yourfolder and all its subfolders rar a yourfiles creates archive yourfiles.rar and compresses all files ...


3

If you scrolled down another dozen lines, you would have found the link to their FTP server and their SourceForge page: ftp://ftp.info-zip.org/pub/infozip/ http://sourceforge.net/projects/infozip/files/ EDIT: Step-by-step to get zip.exe file: Go to FTP server. Click on the system you need. Use "win32" folder for Windows. Click on the version of Zip ...


-2

From Microsoft Technet: There is no zip.exe in Windows 7 and as far as I know there has never been a zip.exe in any version of Windows[...] According to what you wrote, that batch script uses a "zip.exe" file someway deployed on that system, maybe part of a file compression and archiving program. There's no such a command available in a Windows ...


1

A rar file has Recovery Records, so in case of damaged files parts of it can be recovered. When you create a rar, you can specify an amount of correction data in percent to be used. I found that on the German Wikipedia only (https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAR_%28Dateiformat%29#Recovery_Records), the English version lacks this.


1

In my experience, the simplest answer (for Windows, 7, 64-bit) is to use Window's built-in Zip functionality. Use the "Send To" to send the mimetype to a new zipped folder, then use 7Zip to add the META-INF and OEBPS to the new zip. That seems to always work in terms of sequencing the mimetype file first. I have not had success performing this operation ...


1

You can either recreate the complete folder-structure including the All CRGs-Folder or you can ommit all folders inside the ZIP-file by using the -j-flag for the unzip-command. The problem is that the ZIP-file has been created using the All CRGs-Folder as top-level like zip "All CRGs.zip" "All CRGs". The correct way would have been zip "All CRGs.zip" "All ...


0

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [-HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.zfsendtotarget] [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.zfsendtotarget] @="CLSID\\{888DCA60-FC0A-11CF-8F0F-00C04FD7D062}" [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.zfsendtotarget\PersistentHandler] @="{098f2470-bae0-11cd-b579-08002b30bfeb}" [-HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.zip] [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.zip] "PerceivedType"="compressed" "Content ...


0

You could use something like The Unarchiver (freeware) that has prefs for extraction, to put every archive in a separate folder, if there's any danger they contain files of the same name you don't want overwriting. Alternatively, Stuffit Expander (freeware) can be set to automatically rename any conflicts.


1

With creative uses of wildcards. $ tree MyFiles MyFiles ├── dira │   ├── file1 │   ├── file2 │   └── file3 ├── dirb │   ├── file1 │   ├── file2 │   └── file3 ├── dirc │   ├── file1 │   ├── file2 │   └── file3 ├── file1 ├── file2 └── file3 What we need to do is just not tell zip about the root files. Bash wildcards allow us to specify this with zip -r ...


1

You can add -k option to your command line: -k --DOS-names Attempt to convert the names and paths to conform to MSDOS, store only the MSDOS attribute (just the user write attribute from Unix), and mark the entry as made under MSDOS (even though it was not); for compatibility with PKUNZIP under MSDOS which cannot handle certain names such as ...


0

The zip file should be compatible with windows. The ZIP file is not really in FAT format, which is a disk format, but Linux has more file attributes than window. Eg. Window does not have an executable bit. Maybe your problem is other. Check: http://usefulmix.com/creating-a-zip-archive-under-linux-that-is-windows-compatible/


0

Solved it! At the top of the code where I opened the directory, I used "opendir(PDF..." but on the closedir I had "closedir(DIR ..." which meant that the stream was still open. Then - when I went to open the file, I used "open(PDF ..." and that was already open, so it was unable to read in the data to store in the zip. Or at least, that was part of ...


0

Ah, user110346 is onto something. I had the same issue - created a .zip on a Mac that resulted in an error on Windows 7 (but extracted properly on the Mac). Following his hint, I noticed that I have a bunch of folders with a bullet in the name (option-8 on the Mac keyboard). Removed all those folders, re-zipped and presto - the .zip file works without ...


0

Using 7za (available in package "p7zip") with the l (list) function and the -slt (technical mode for list) switch: 7za l -slt my_archive.zip


0

Just use WINRAR and tick the boxes of all the context menu options in the setup. Then you can select all the archives to be unzipped, right click on them and drag them to the folder you want them to be in and this will reveal the WinRar context menu. You can then choose either to extract them all to the same directory, or each to their own named directory ...


0

The simple answer is to extract each archive to a separate directory thereby giving each archive a unique namespace (eg. 1/test.log, 1/test1.log, 2/test2.log, 2/test1.log). If they must end up in the same place then you could instead prepend the archive name to each file name instead (eg. 1__test.log, 1__test1.log, 2__test2.log, 2__test1.log). This is ...


0

This usually occurs when one of the file names in your folders has a special character, such as quotation marks ". You have to ignore those files. But it is difficult when you have several thousand files, maybe you can try 7-zip.


1

If your primary goal is compatibility with all/most OSs and unzipping tools, then Deflate is your best choice. From Wikipedia's Zip->Compression Methods article: The most commonly used compression method is DEFLATE, which is described in IETF RFC 1951.


0

Added only as current useful information There are utilities like BetterZip [$19.95] that will specifically exclude any platform-specific extras like Mac ._ [dot underscore] files etc.



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