New answers tagged

0

Probably. A simple google search turned up this. It looks like there is full support for Zip archives.


0

You can automate compressing files with WinRAR and provide an exclusion list using a command line interface. You can exclude the files and folders using -x switch in the command. Run Command Prompt (cmd.exe) and type the following command: "C:\Program Files\WinRAR\Rar.exe" a -x*\A -x*.bat -xfile3.doc folder.rar folder If you want to automate your GUI, ...


0

Below did the trick:- Open “Windows Explorer“. Select “View” and check “Hidden Items” to show hidden files and folders. Navigate to “This PC” > “OS C:” > “Users” > “yourusername” > “AppData” > “Roaming” > “Microsoft” > “Windows” > “SendTo“ Delete “Bluetooth” with 0KB. Thanks.


0

Zip for Windows is available from: Info-Zip for Windows, where you can get Info-Zip 3.00 for Windows or variations such as Info-Zip 3.00 for 64-bit Windows. (UnZip 6.00 for Windows, or an older UnZip 5.52 for 64-bit Windows, are also available.) and You'll likely need to either: extract the files to a location, and then make sure that location is added to ...


2

It seems to me that you're trying to run a Unix command under Windows. While this is tecnically possible, as many utilities can be also compiled to run under Windows, they do not come installed by default. You could run zip under Cygwin, or else, try unzipping your archive with the command line version of 7-Zip. Also, be sure that the dir holding your ...


0

you'll need WinRAR Installed Open Notepad and paste the following: @echo off for %%F in (%*) do ( CD %%~dpF "C:\ProgramFiles\WinRAR\rar.exe" a -m0 -hpThisIsThePassword "%%~nF.rar" "%%~nxF" ) pause Customize the script (optional) read WinRAR.chm (in your WinRAR folder) and make sure you understand the command line switches needed. ...


0

i just used 7zip and it managed to pick the right encoding. (something that standard zip couldn't do) but used it on Windows, with the GUI tool. Maybe the command line 7z will work for you, too.


0

Just like other answers, but excluding directories entirely, instead of excluding all contents of directories: zip -r myarchive.zip dir1 -x dir1/ignoreDir1/\* dir1/ignoreDir2/\*


1

You can write a PowerShell script and have Windows Task Scheduler run it every 2 hours A quick and dirty example script: # Declare variables $db = "[DB NAME]" $user = "[DB USERNAME]" $pw = "[DB PASSWORD]" $date = (Get-Date).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd_HH.mm.ss") $mysql_backupfile = ".\backup_$date.sql" $zipped_backupfile = "$mysql_backupfile.zip" # Backup MySql ...


1

to pull out a single file called zipfile.zip from archive tarfile.tar: tar xvf /path/to/tarfile.tar /path/to/where/you/want/zipfile.zip You could use perl to recurse #!/usr/bin/perl my @directories_to_search = ('/root/path/to/s3/dir/'); use File::Find; use File::Basename; finddepth(\&extract_zip, @directories_to_search); sub extract_zip { ...


-2

.tar files are not compressed files. .tar files are for wrapping multiple files into one. .gz files can only zip one file. So to make a multiple-file .gz compressed file, you make a .tar file and turn that into a .gz file. But there are no merits to compressing a pre-compressed file. So it makes no sense to make (for example) a .tar.gz.gz or a .zip with only ...


0

7-Zip writes all its messages to stdout, including error and warning messages. This means you can collect all the output from it by redirecting stdout it to a file. A command like the following will redirect all output (including from stderr) to Log.txt: 7za a Test.7z *.* >Log.txt 2>&1



Top 50 recent answers are included