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Mar
25
comment Making a Synology diskstation accessible via WLAN
@FrankThomas: Well, the reason why the 2-bay NAS is locked in a cellar room behind a steel door is that I'd like it to keep a backup for the case when the whole place burns down. So, moving it upstairs won't do (though so far I'm indeed taking it upstairs every 3-4 days, plug an ethernet cable in, and run the backup. That's... sub optimal). Ideally, I'd like this to happen via cron every night, without me even thinking about it. So a typical $20 AP should do in your opinion? I'll try that, thank you :-)
Mar
25
asked Making a Synology diskstation accessible via WLAN
Mar
17
answered Can a file be maliciously changed in a way that maintains its original SHA-1 Hash?
Mar
12
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
11
awarded  Yearling
Mar
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
10
comment How can Windows dump the complete RAM in the hibernation file so fast?
@PeterMortensen: No, I really mean gather write (as opposed to scatter read). This means writing to a single file while gathering the data from multiple locations. You supply an array of structures each of which contains a start address and a length (with strict alignment requirements). The operating system passes these to the controller, and the hardware does the rest.
Mar
10
answered How can Windows dump the complete RAM in the hibernation file so fast?
Jan
19
comment find/xargs, filenames with spaces, and quotes
Given Windows and no Perl installed, that's unluckily not an option, did it manually by splitting a file.
Jan
19
comment find/xargs, filenames with spaces, and quotes
Ended up redirecting all to a file, splitting the file in 8 pieces, and running the 8 pieces in parallel by hand.
Jan
17
comment find/xargs, filenames with spaces, and quotes
Well, the point of xargs is that it lets me run 8 jobs on 8 cores, with bash I could have them run serially or to fork 1,800 processes, neither of which is good. Adding \" in printf sure does the job, but xargs strips them out. It also strips out \"\" or '\" or \"', which is my problem.
Jan
17
comment find/xargs, filenames with spaces, and quotes
Aware of that flag, but this won't work either, sadly, still need quotes for lame.
Jan
17
asked find/xargs, filenames with spaces, and quotes
Jan
6
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
13
comment Why do English characters require fewer bytes to represent than other alphabets?
Unicode makes the assumption that you may need every character that any human since the stone age has ever drawn at any time, as special characters. 2/3 of that could be solved easier, better, and more efficiently by using a different font or formatting hints (like, numbers in circles, or superscript numbers). It certainly "works", somehow, but it's wrong-headed on so many ends.
Dec
13
comment Why do English characters require fewer bytes to represent than other alphabets?
@MilindR: hard to fit into 600 chars... Unicode contains a lot of crap that nobody will ever need (do you speak Babylonian?), and it encodes a lot of crap that nobody will seriously need (Klingon, really? Numbers in circles? ANSI control codes?), some of which are in low numbers, making UTF-8 considerably less efficient for roman languages than it could be (at no extra cost). Also, it allows a considerable number of symbols being encoded in two or more ways (e.g. accented/umlauted characters). This requires considerable work ("normalization") that would actually not be necessary.
Nov
15
comment How do I determine whether a drive is an HDD or SSD in Windows 8?
You should still not do that, even if the risk is low. It's unnecessary since you can tell without taking the risk. A mechanical disk makes very noticeable sounds while spinning up and down, and while seeking. Solid state disks make no sound at all.
Nov
10
comment How do web-servers “listen” to IP addresses, interrupt or polling?
Slight nitpick: It is not really necessary to block. As soon as the server process has created a listening socket, the kernel will accept SYNs on that port, even while you are not blocked inside accept. They are (luckily, or it would totally suck!) independent, asynchronously running tasks. As connections come in, they're placed into a queue where accept pulls them from. Only if there are none, it blocks.
Aug
11
comment How to limit HDD write speed for chosen programs
If the computer is "unusable" when copying huge files, is it possible that you have forgotten to enable DMA? Normally, whether or not the disk is busy makes little or no difference since that happens without much (or any) CPU intervention.
Jul
17
awarded  Popular Question