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Jul
25
comment Using motherboard splash screen during Linux boot
Please, if you have no substantial, on-topic answers, don't abuse the comments section either.
Jul
25
comment Using motherboard splash screen during Linux boot
It is increasingly obvious you are trolling me. Let me translate that last comment: "How do I make water boil?" "You should look into the stove's manual and turn up the heat." Yes, I have used my google-fu and did not come up with anything. Yes, I could play with writing/modifying a boot loader and rebuilding the kernel to make it silent. I'm obviously posing the question so I don't spend days reading UEFI specs, setting up the environment to rebuild boot loader and kernel and finally hacking on them before I know no one else did the work already.
Jul
25
comment Using motherboard splash screen during Linux boot
@EirNym What you say is how things used to be. But exactly the fact they are not is what makes this an interesting technical question. This integration between Windows and the firmware is exactly what surprised me about Windows 8@UEFI. This is how it looked ever since I installed it -- this is regular, unmodded, non-OEM Win8: goo.gl/photos/skuEy7VevgzdGubq7 and it clearly picks up mobo-specific, Gigabyte-provided splash image. Since this is clearly technically possible under UEFI, I'm interested in how it is possible, and how to do it under other bootloaders/kernels/operating systems.
Jul
24
comment Using motherboard splash screen during Linux boot
That is not what I am looking for. Please ignore that I mentioned Windows; I am mentioning it mainly as an example of what I want to happen. I am looking for a way for Linux bootloader and kernel to draw (or keep on screen) the exact image that is drawn by UEFI (and, if possible, technical info on how Windows goes about it). Manual methods for extracting actual Windows splash, which HAPPENS to be also the UEFI splash on your specific laptop, is uninteresting. If I plug in a bootable Linux USB stick into random UEFI machine, it should use the machine-specific splash. Is that clearer?
Jul
24
comment Using motherboard splash screen during Linux boot
Also note I don't care about modifying the Windows boot process, which your questions relate to.
Jul
24
comment Using motherboard splash screen during Linux boot
@EirNym No. Windows 8.1 under UEFI can display motherboard-manufacturer-provided splash logo. I don't care about replacing one hardcoded logo with another one; the point is to get machine-specific logo displayed for increased perception of a butter-smooth, transition-free boot process. The questions you linked are therefore unrelated.
Jul
24
comment Using motherboard splash screen during Linux boot
@EirNym How does it obtain a 'copy' of 'that image'? How would I get another OS to obtain a 'copy' of that image and draw it during boot?
Jul
24
asked Using motherboard splash screen during Linux boot
May
19
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
17
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Feb
19
asked Blocking AAAA responses for certain domains
Jan
21
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Dec
27
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
8
comment What do you call a keyboard with a bar-shaped Enter key?
'most common desktop keyboards outside the UK' -- I can state that Croatian keyboards are usually (and preferably to Croats) ISO layout, so I'm not sure the 'outside the UK' statement is accurate, especially given it references to a very, very large portion of the world.
Nov
3
asked Windows: creating a virtual drive out of a physical partition
Oct
8
revised From where do I get a reply if I ping broadcast address 255.255.255.255 from a router
improved formatting
Oct
8
suggested approved edit on From where do I get a reply if I ping broadcast address 255.255.255.255 from a router
Jul
20
comment Routing IPv6 traffic through Debian pptpd into Hurricane Electric's IPv6 tunnel
That's the address on the 'other side' of the PPTP connection. If a packet needs to go toward the private subnet, this routes the traffic to be handled by the device handling this address. At least that's my understanding of what I have done; feel free to point out if that's not necessary and explain what's actually happening :-)
Jul
11
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