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463115
bio website google.com
location Germany
age 36
visits member for 4 years, 10 months
seen yesterday
mhh .. nah

Feb
26
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Free Mac OS X application for downloading an entire website
Feb
26
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How to transfer mail/contacts from Outlook 2011 for the Mac to Outlook 2010 for Windows
Feb
26
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Remove empty lines and spaces in Notepad++?
Feb
26
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Opera 10 eating CPU on Ubuntu 9.04
Feb
25
comment Accessing an old, populated hard drive with a NAS?
mhh, sorry, i misread your question: the old disk is from an older machine (desktop, laptop etc), not from an older nas? yeah, than it's more likely to have the native fs of the OS from that old machine. if that OS was windows than ntfs is obviously a valid guess.
Feb
25
comment Accessing an old, populated hard drive with a NAS?
f you can access the nas with ssh or something similar and have some unix skills you might be able to mount the disk in your new nas. but there is no guarantee that it won't do auto magic. unlikely but not 100%. the fs on the old disk is most likely not ntfs, but a native Linux / Bsd fs.
Feb
25
comment Accessing an old, populated hard drive with a NAS?
yes. you just need the right fs drivers. and this is best accomplished by using a virtual machine with a Linux rescue disc.
Feb
25
comment Accessing an old, populated hard drive with a NAS?
The manual of your new NAS will state what it will do with a disk that you attach to the RAID-slots (even when the OS is only using a software RAID). All pure speculation: read the manual.
Feb
25
comment Accessing an old, populated hard drive with a NAS?
You missed my points. As I said: consult the manual of your new NAS to see what you can do via their usual Webinterface. The old disk might contain any FS that is used by either Linux or any *BSD variant, depends what the old NAS used as the OS. Or stop wasting (your) time by trying to bend your current NAS and just plug the disk into your usual machine and access the disk via a Virtual machine. You might be lucky and the new NAS will do as you whish. You might be unlucky. In any case: You will have more control with a virtual machine. End of story.
Feb
25
comment Accessing an old, populated hard drive with a NAS?
Your NAS (the old and the new) don't use Fat*, NTFS or HFS+. They use something that comes at a low license fee (as in "free") and then they use something like CIFS (or AFP) to allow other machines to write / read via network (hence the term "network attached storage"). The disk is unlikely to be formatted with eith Fat (which is not good enough for a server filesystem anyway) or NTFS (which would need a reimplantation of NTFS) or HFS+ (which is not good enough for a server filesystem either). To your machines the filesystem is transparent, but underneath it will use something native to the OS
Feb
25
comment Accessing an old, populated hard drive with a NAS?
that depends on the nas. consult the manual of it. attaching the old disk to your usual machine will sidestep the problem of eventual formatting. the fsystem on the old disk might be one of ext3/4, xfs (maybe inside a lvm) or some ufs2 partition, depends on the old nas.
Feb
25
comment Accessing an old, populated hard drive with a NAS?
replace "desktop" with "your computer". MacBook, desktop, does not matter. install a virtual machine (VMware Fusion, virtual machine) to it and then you can toy around with a OS that has the Filesystem drivers you need.
Feb
25
comment Accessing an old, populated hard drive with a NAS?
what machine do you use to access the nas?
Feb
25
answered Accessing an old, populated hard drive with a NAS?
Feb
25
comment Where are microsoft office options stored?
Did you try to filter for changed files as well?
Feb
25
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How do I silence onscreen Windows 8 “Touch Keyboard” key press sounds?
Feb
25
reviewed Reject suggested edit on qmail server, failure notices. Is the server compromised?
Feb
25
reviewed Approve suggested edit on OpenOffice (3.3) for OS X - save default as .doc/docx
Feb
25
reviewed Approve suggested edit on OpenOffice (3.3) for OS X - save default as .doc/docx
Feb
25
answered TCP/IP minimal size