101 reputation
2
bio website star-hope.org
location United States
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen 14 hours ago

Videogame and simulations programmer.

Lisper, JAPH, and MOS-65xx hacker, among other things.


19h
comment pkttyagent doesn't seem to work for virt-manager over ssh -X?
That's something I'd tried (with the & rather than ; to allow it to run in background), but did not seem to work…
Feb
28
comment pkttyagent doesn't seem to work for virt-manager over ssh -X?
(:facepalm:) I had tried this, but I misinterpreted the error messages it spouts. /usr/libexec/polkit-gnome-authentication-agent-1 moans about failing to connect to a DBus socket — but, it I background it and then run virt-manager, it does in fact work. Apparently the WARNING it prints is related to a11y, and there's no positive indication that it worked regardless. edit maaaybe. It seems to hang before allowing me to enter a password, but it may just be super slow for some reason.
Feb
28
comment I am inside my router settings but I don't know whats the password
Note, if they're saved in Firefox, you can view the saved passwords in (Firefox menu) → Preferences → Preferences → (Security tab) → Saved Passwords… → Show Passwords.
Feb
2
comment Can you grab any IP address on the Internet?
actually, you can ask for a specific address via DHCP. It's up to the server whether it wishes to agree to your request, however.
Dec
28
comment What's the difference between one-dash and two-dashes for command prompt parameters?
For bonus points: programs conforming to the Gnu standards for --long-options will accept any unique abbreviation as well. So, for a program with options --file-in and --file-out, you could use --file-o=foo or --file-i=foo, which can save some typing for --very-long-optional-parameters.
Dec
28
comment What's the difference between one-dash and two-dashes for command prompt parameters?
It should be noted that the GNU standard libraries provide the functionality of mapping the one-minus-one-letter, two-minus-multi-letter options, so all new GNU programs and most new free software in general uses this notation (e.g. -f, -f foo, --file, --file foo, --file=foo, --fil=foo, --fi=foo); throwbacks such as tar, ps, find and such had their command-line syntax set by POSIX before this standard had completely gelled. On a Gnu/Linux system, it's a reasonably safe bet that at least --help will (almost) always be supported, as well as man <command> or info <command>