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bio website ericlippert.com
location Seattle, WA
age 41
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Eric Lippert develops C# analyzers at Coverity. During his sixteen years at Microsoft he was a developer of the Visual Basic, VBScript, JScript and C# compilers and a member of the C# language design committee; he is now a C# MVP. He is on Twitter at "@ericlippert" and writes a blog about programming language design and other fabulous adventures in coding at http://ericlippert.com.


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comment Why do English characters require fewer bytes to represent than other alphabets?
You should read this article by the founder of StackExchange: joelonsoftware.com/articles/Unicode.html
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revised How are pseudorandom and truly random numbers different and why does it matter?
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Feb
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comment How are pseudorandom and truly random numbers different and why does it matter?
@CodesInChaos: The argument "we don't know of an attack which can take advantage of the fact that the vast majority of possible-IRL-shuffles will never be produced" does not imply that such an attack is impossible, just that we don't know what it is or how to defend against it. The right attitude in that case is to eliminate the possibility of attack by eliminating the condition: make an RNG of sufficient quality that it actually can generate every possible deck.
Feb
6
comment How are pseudorandom and truly random numbers different and why does it matter?
Paco I strongly agree with your basic premise but I am not following your arithmetic. There are 2^226 possible decks, and 2^160 of them can be produced by an algorithm with a 160 bit seed. How from that do you deduce that there are 2^66 decks not produced? 2^226 - 2^160 is not 2^66. 2^226 / 2^160 is 2^66 but why is division being used to compute a difference?
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