345 reputation
27
bio website kutulu.org
location Florida
age 38
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Sep 13 at 0:37

Jun
13
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
21
awarded  Caucus
Apr
12
awarded  Critic
Apr
12
comment Why do English characters require fewer bytes to represent than other alphabets?
This answer isn't even accurate. In UTF-16 encoded Unicode (like C# and Java use) most characters, including the original ASCII set, take up 2 bytes, which very obscure characters take up 4.
Sep
25
comment Revert New Tab Page Behavior in Google Chrome 29+
(hrm. the comment about the flag going away appears to have been edited out of the google groups thread, so there may be hope...)
Sep
25
awarded  Commentator
Sep
25
comment Revert New Tab Page Behavior in Google Chrome 29+
fair warning: Google has already said that this flag will be removed from Chrome once the new tab page has been field-tested, so this is a best a temporary fix.
Apr
22
comment Why is a .ISO called a .ISO?
@ZanLynx note that some CD images are not uncompressed bitwise-copies of an ISO-9660 or ISO-13346 file system; those should not use an .ISO extension. In your examples, CDR is just the MacOS name for ISO, but IMG could literally be anything (including a floppy disk image).
Feb
15
awarded  Yearling
Aug
24
comment In a URL, what is // for?
I don't think so. At least I've never seen any draft documents/examples/etc that have alternative heirarchy scheme for URLs. My impression has always been that TBL just wanted something to make it obvious that a URL pointed to an actual resource (and not arbitrary data), and using // made things look sufficiently-file-like. Every other style of URN I've ever seen has no special prefix in it's data part. Some protocols do allow that (I think telnet and gopher, e.g.) but I've never seen anything like that for http(s).
Aug
24
comment In a URL, what is // for?
@Izkata: you would probably not see a non-URL URN used with a communications protocol; that's what the // is for. It indicates that the protocol is being used to access a (possibly remote) network location where a resource is to be found. There are plenty of other URN's that have other data parts and don't use // (your browser probably recognizes "mailto:", for example). See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/URI_scheme
Jul
21
comment What is .ncftp?
or try asking on superuser (so they can tell you to man ncftp :)
May
30
comment MSDN Ultimate - using Office 2010 for general business purposes
you are correct; the wording in the MS Guidance is meant to differentiate 'production' use (Office products, for whatever you normally use Office for in your business) from 'development' use (everything else, for developing solutions only), which I think MS believes is a clearer distinction than "general use".
May
7
comment Flatmate uses torrents, will this slow the internet connection?
+1 for the scheduler, hadn't seen that before and it looks really useful. Clearly I need to spend more time in the uTorrent options.
May
7
comment Flatmate uses torrents, will this slow the internet connection?
@ChrisNava My 1/3 number was based purely on the fact that there are 3 people sharing one connection so each gets 1/3 :) Not at all scientific, just easy to sell to your roommates.
May
6
answered Flatmate uses torrents, will this slow the internet connection?
May
1
awarded  Editor
May
1
revised How to use SSH private key to log in without entering passphrase every time on Mac OS X Lion?
added 668 characters in body
May
1
answered How to use SSH private key to log in without entering passphrase every time on Mac OS X Lion?