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Apr
27
answered Microsoft BlueTrack technology on cotton surfaces
Apr
17
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
9
awarded  Yearling
Jan
15
comment Why is sudo bash needed?
@DavidBetz I don't know what you're talking about. sudo was introduced to serve the requirement "allow user X to run command Y as root", for configurable combinations of X and Y. This is not "partial sudo", it is "sudo as designed". The requirement to run any command as the superuser is met by "su -c <command>" (which requires the root password, each time, for obviously good reasons).
Jan
15
comment Why is sudo bash needed?
@DavidBetz man sudo, man sudoers.
Jan
15
comment Why is sudo bash needed?
@DavidBetz There is everything wrong with it. The purpose of sudo is to allow certain users to run certain commands as root, without giving them the full privileges (i.e. the root password). The idea is that those commands are sandboxed: they do certain specific jobs, and only those jobs, without allowing privilege escalation. When users are trusted to be root, you give them the root password.
Dec
16
revised How can I remove exponential terms and floating point numbers from a text file on linux?
Forgot leading sign.
Dec
16
answered How can I remove exponential terms and floating point numbers from a text file on linux?
Dec
11
comment How can Windows 10 function on as little as 32 GB of disk space?
32 Gb is enough for something like 100 hour-long instructional video lessons, shot in 720P, on how to design and implement an operating system.
Dec
11
comment How can Windows 10 function on as little as 32 GB of disk space?
The question to ask is: how can an OS install in 32 Gb and not have 31.7+ Gb left over for you.
Dec
7
comment Too many authentication failures for *username*
Why can't we just can we just tell the SSH daemon via sshd_config to accept more keys?
Nov
6
awarded  Self-Learner
Sep
24
awarded  Famous Question
Aug
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
23
revised svchost eating up memory
added 510 characters in body
Aug
21
revised svchost eating up memory
Add smoking gun screenshots from Task Manager.
Aug
13
revised svchost eating up memory
added 166 characters in body
Aug
13
answered svchost eating up memory
Aug
13
comment svchost eating up memory
Aha, question for this: superuser.com/questions/860117/…
Aug
13
comment svchost eating up memory
I sometimes have this problem. The "go to services" tool in the Task Manager is completely useless. Sure, it tells you which services are sharing that process. But it doesn't tell you which one is gobbling up the memory! Is there some way to isolate those services to that they use their own instance of the service host? Then when the problem happens again, the offending service will be the only thing in its bloated container.