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seen Dec 12 at 22:44

Mar
31
awarded  Yearling
Nov
28
comment MIxing RFC1918 NATed and public IP addresses using IPTABLES
The router does not necessarily need an address in the x.y.z.104/30 block. As you observe, there are only 4 IP addresses there, and if you consume one for the router, plus waste 2 as the network broadcast address, that doesn't leave a whole lot. So to save those IP addresses, the router would only have the 10.0.1.1 address on its inside address and have static routes to direct the traffic to all 4 public addresses to the apporpiate SIP server. The target of this route would be the SIP server's internal 10.0.1.x address. The SIP server has the public address(es) as a secondary address on "lo"
Jul
4
answered Log of mounted/unmounted devices in Unix
Jul
4
comment Webcam automatically takes picture when the computer wakes up
Any possible answers to this would probably be platform-specific. I suggest you mention which platform you are interested in.
Jul
3
comment How to configure a 10. network in bind? (PTR)
By the way, stub zones are totally unrelated in this context. And yes, just putting everything in the 10.in-addr.arpa zone is the easiest way.
Jul
1
comment How to configure a 10. network in bind? (PTR)
But you already have the 10.0.0.0/8 zone configured (which is fine), so if you just add reverse DNS entries to that zone you wouldn't be changing that.
Jun
30
comment How to configure a 10. network in bind? (PTR)
That makes no sense. There is absolutely nothing wrong with having a zone "10.in-addr.arpa" and another zone "1.0.10.in-addr.arpa" (in most cases you should have a proper delegation in "10.in-addr.arpa"). But in any case what I was asking was why you want to create a new zone at all. Why don't you just put PTR records directly in "10.in-addr.arpa"? That's really much simpler!
Jun
30
comment How to configure a 10. network in bind? (PTR)
Why don't you just leave "10.in-addr.arpa" active, create no other zones, and put everything in there?
Jun
29
comment eMMC Standards and File System support
Re: 'discard' option: isn't it the other way around? Using TRIM on any kind of flash device should increase performance (not decrease it) because the FTL layer becomes aware that it no longer has to track a particular block (maintain the mapping from logical block to physical block, refresh the block once in a while for wear leveling, etc...)
Jun
23
comment Public Wi-Fi and software updates
OK, Thanks @Karan for the additional info.
Jun
23
comment Public Wi-Fi and software updates
@Karan A MITM would only be possible if the update protocol does not actually authenticate the update. To paraphrase what I already said, it's very unlikely that they would have been so incompetent as to not authenticate updates. I mean, all you really need to do is either transfer it over https or else supply a lightweight detached signature. That being said, I guess Microsoft has been known to be really stupid before...
Jun
23
answered What would happen if I set up a host named 'com' on a local network?
Jun
23
answered Wipe free space on LVM-LUKS (dm-crypt) Volume
Jun
23
comment Public Wi-Fi and software updates
It seems like a stupid recommendation (assuming the software update protocol authenticated the incoming software updates, which it would be even stupider if it didn't). Of all of the things other people could observe you doing (your email, the websites you like to browse, etc...), the fact that you're updating your operating system is close to the least private I can think of!
Jun
22
comment Resetting $PATH in OS X 10.8
Well, I would say that setting $PATH in both ~/.profile and ~/.bash_profile is poor form, but the bash manpage mentions "~/.bash_profile, ~/.bash_login, and ~/.profile, in that order", so at least you know which one runs latest and therefore overrides changes made in the others.
Jun
22
comment Resetting $PATH in OS X 10.8
Well, as for Macports, I notice that /opt/local/bin is not in your $PATH which is probably should be. brew, I'm not familiar with. But if you changed your $PATH, you did it by some other means than simply defining a harmless alias (which doesn't even live longer than the shell it was defined in). Check if you changed ~/.profile or ~/.bash_profile or similar files, for example.
Jun
22
comment Resetting $PATH in OS X 10.8
"Running $PATH" makes no sense. $PATH contains a colon-separated list of directories. You can't treat that as a command and run it.
Jun
22
comment Resetting $PATH in OS X 10.8
The existence of that alias would have absolutely no effect on brew or port.
Jun
22
answered Resetting $PATH in OS X 10.8
Jun
22
answered how do I know if the number of inodes are already taken?