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Jan
25
comment Compromised RSA key - unsure of the scope of the issue
Based on webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/42680/… (which this is a duplicate of) I am assuming that this RSA is used in some sort of web context, but you need to be a lot more specific.
Jan
25
comment Compromised RSA key - unsure of the scope of the issue
It ENTIRELY depends on what the RSA is being used to protect!
Jan
25
comment Merge command history between the Python shell and the Unix terminal
Have you tried reload(modulename)? It won't work as well with the from something import * form as it does with import module and from dotted.name import submodule though.
Jan
22
answered How do I move a line in a file to the top from the command line?
Jan
22
comment How do I move a line in a file to the top from the command line?
From the command line, it is always easier to generate a new file given an input file than to edit a file in place (change its contents). Is that good enough for you? After you've generated the new file you can always move it back to the original filename (thus squashing the original file).
Jan
14
comment File size on disk gets minimum equal to memory page size instead of disk sector size?
Individual filesystems are free to store files in such a way that they take up however much space the filesystem designer or implementor pleases. If you don't mention which type of filesystem you're asking about, there is no possible answer to your question.
Jan
11
comment Why the need to mount a partition with nosuid when noexec is present?
I have to guess that they're just being safe: so if you forget to set noexec at least you've still got nosuid. It's a weak argument though since both flags are configured in the same place, so if you forget one you're likely to forget the other one too!
Jan
11
comment Why the need to mount a partition with nosuid when noexec is present?
You would think so [that nosuid is redundant], yes. Can you cite any reference that recommended that you needed to enable nosuid even though noexec was already enabled?
Jan
10
comment How to make a filesystem readonly by default?
The LVM/device-mapper layer is really quite thin. I don't think it has even the potential to mess with the data. It's akin to using a partition (like /dev/sda1) as opposed to the whole block device (like /dev/sda): it's the same disk blocks, just shifted over by an offset equal to the offset of the start of the partition.
Jan
9
comment What does a file system scan really do?
Different filesystems are different. ZFS is an example of a filesystem that does indeed verify and repair the filesystem online while it is mounted; it calls this scrubbing.
Jan
9
comment How to make a filesystem readonly by default?
If your filesystems are on LVM LVs, you can make the LV read-only (with lvchange -p r). If the underlying block device is read-only, the filesystem has no choice but to become read-only.
Jan
9
answered What does a file system scan really do?
Dec
27
comment Get link to an IMAP mail from within Thunderbird?
If you do "View Source" on the email within Thunderbird then it's in the title of the resulting window. Is that good enough?
Dec
24
revised Mac OS X terminal and PATH variable
"extra return" is not clear. It's an extra newline (ASCII NL) character.
Dec
24
suggested approved edit on Mac OS X terminal and PATH variable
Dec
20
comment How can I tell whether an interrupted rm -r removed any files?
There is no "filesystem log" (unless you mean the HFS+ journal???). The best you can probably do is look at the modification times of the parent directories of the things that might have been removed. If the modification time is right around the time you did the rm -r, then chances are something got removed.
Dec
12
comment unix move cursor after last character
@jermel well, the other person whose terminal you used probably wasn't using vi mode. It's not an "issue", it's a preference. Maybe you set it by mistake? Check your ~/.inputrc.
Dec
2
answered MIxing RFC1918 NATed and public IP addresses using IPTABLES
Nov
12
comment What is a good partitioning design/scheme for a multi-boot *nix system?
Not a full answer but a quick comment: (1) there is no reason to make separate LVM PVs and VGs for each OS. This just costs you flexibility by making hard boundaries on the amount of space each takes. If they're all various Linux distributions, just use a single PV&VG and each OS gets its own LVs (2) For casual use, you really don't need to have separate /, /tmp, /var, etc... Just make a / for each OS. Perhaps make a single shared /home if you want to share home directories between OSes. (3) you can actually share /boot between OSes if you oversize it, but it's cleaner if you don't
Nov
3
comment What value do I pass to `xrandr --output`?
@Claudius good idea. I've added that. Also, please feel free to edit answers yourself if you have something useful to add!