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visits member for 5 years, 5 months
seen Dec 16 at 15:22

I started learning web design to support my efforts as a singer/songwriter. I'm still doing that, but these days my actual job involves building intranet resources as well. My skillset is PHP, HTML, CSS, and Javascript (I'm a big fan of jQuery).


Jun
29
comment Is there a fix for the “Too many open files in system” error on OS X 10.7.1?
Actually, my "heavy use" wasn't the issue; my settings for the maximum number of open files for the kernal and per-process were far lower than what the defaults should be.
Jun
22
comment Is there a fix for the “Too many open files in system” error on OS X 10.7.1?
@slhck - I have the same problem. The circumstances are basically "at random." I'm a developer, so I'm using my Mac fairly heavily: running one or more databases, a web server, testing tools, one or more browsers, and a music player all at once. Google Chrome seems to be one program that has a lot of files open.
Jun
7
comment How can I discard my undo history in vim?
That does work. Would you mind explaining it?
Jun
1
comment How can I do a recursive find and replace from the command line?
@DanielAndersson - It appears that you're correct; my Linux box can do the find... -exec version, but my Mac can't. sed - 's/foo/bar/g' does not work; -i is to provide a backup file extension, and giving it an empty string means 'don't back up.' The command in my answer works on both platforms.
May
25
comment How can I do a recursive find and replace from the command line?
@DanielAndersson - I seem to be getting different results on my work Mac and home Ubuntu machines, so I need to do some more tinkering before I update this answer. One note, though: the find... -exec method is interesting, but man find says to use '-execdir' instead for security reasons.
Apr
26
comment Is there a way to make my hard drive inaccessible to everyone but me?
One caveat when encrypting an existing unencrypted drive: if it's solid state, it may not be re-writing over the same sectors, because it varies them to extend the disk's life. So data on a solid state drive is really only safe if it was encrypted from the start.
Feb
27
comment Can I turn off Google Chrome's new prerendering?
@Dennis - Yes, I did quit the browser and open it again.
Feb
20
comment Can I encrypt data in a way that it can be read normally but can't be copied or edited?
@Barfieldmv - maybe true, but 1) streaming into a viewer app is a form of copying, 2) the remote desktop solution assumes there are no security holes there, 3) both of these are more difficult and more open to error than making a simple copy. If my hard drive is physically unavailable to you, I can guarantee you can't modify it. If you have some kind of network access, there's always a chance you know about a hack that I haven't guarded against.
Feb
20
comment Can a Yahoo employee read my email?
This is a fundamental and important truth about all cloud services. The only way to ensure that someone won't abuse your data is to not give them access: either don't store it with them, or encrypt it first and don't give them the key. All the laws and promises in the world may be overruled by a government demand, a hack, or simple employee dishonesty. It can be reasonable to trust a service with your data, but you should know that it really comes down to trust. And that trust may have to extend to third parties, including the government, who can legally (or illegally) demand access.
Feb
20
comment Can I encrypt data in a way that it can be read normally but can't be copied or edited?
+1 for explanation of copying. Also, your second point illustrates another well-known principle in computer security: physical access means "game over." If someone has physical control of your drive, they can do whatever they want with it. The only thing you might be able to do is prevent them from reading its contents by using strong encryption.
Feb
19
comment Electricity speed and data transfer
+1. Also, sound waves are similar: a sound wave moves through air at around 343 meters per second. If the air itself moved that fast, it would blow you away; instead, the air molecules knock against each other, one after another, transmitting energy from one to the next at that speed, while each individual molecule mostly stays put.
Feb
19
comment Electricity speed and data transfer
See also: programmers.stackexchange.com/a/132705/7217
Feb
19
comment Electricity speed and data transfer
@Delison - there is no such thing as transmitting 1s and 0s; those are a matter of interpreting something that is transmitted. If you vary the current on a wire, and we've agreed ahead of time that anything over X volts will be considered a 1 and anything under Y volts a 0, it's our mutual standard of interpretation (aka "protocol") for an analog, real-world thing which creates binary information. We could just as well throw sticks over a wall and measure them; anything longer than 10cm would be a 1; smaller would be a 0. Binary data is interpreted, not sent or stored.
Jan
30
comment How can I be totally invisible to Facebook?
Clever. For users who don't understand this, it would mean that when my computer tries to load an image or other resource from Facebook's site, it would look for it on its own network address, not find the resource, and give up. Facebook would never know about the request.
Jan
18
comment what is the command+k ( in mac ) equivalent in ubuntu
On my Mac, Control + l inserts a bunch of space below the last output so that the screen appears clear, but you can still scroll up and see the previous output. Command + K, on the other hand, makes it impossible to scroll back to the previous output. Sometimes that is preferable. Do you know how to do the latter on other Unix systems? (Also I don't think bash or zsh are relevant so much as the terminal emulator.)
Jan
18
comment what is the command+k ( in mac ) equivalent in ubuntu
FYI - apparently this is called "clear scrollback" or "clearing the scrollback buffer" and is a function of the terminal program (not the shell, such as bash or zsh).
Dec
16
comment Extend Monitors on Both Sides - Using Splitter
The problem is that the computer only "sees" one output for display, so it pushes one image out that pipe. The fact that you later split it and send it two places doesn't change that. You need the computer to "know" to send multiple images.
Dec
16
comment Extend Monitors on Both Sides - Using Splitter
Clever, if impractical. :)
Dec
8
comment Vim lint check - only show message if there's an error
Syntastic has become one of my biggest time-saving tools since you told me about it. Just wanted to note that generally the error-checking is done by calling out to an external program, which may need to be installed. You can find out what it needs by looking in the syntax_checker file. For example, for Javascript checking you need to have JSLint (jsl command line utility) installed: superuser.com/questions/247012/…
Dec
8
comment Is a file system just the layout of folders?
Great answer! Could you add some info about how file systems differ in behavior? For instance, I've heard some do "journaling". I've also heard that ext is less subject to fragmentation than FAT32.