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Dec
4
comment Does Vim have something like <C-w> in insert mode which deletes back a Word?
This is nice, but a little buggy. If my cursor is directly after whatever and I use it, I end up with r leftover. If my cursor is after whatever (after the space), it deletes the whole word but leaves two spaces after the previous word.
Oct
21
comment How can I discard my undo history in vim?
Ha! Just turn that feature off, eh? :) Not sure why it took me so long to notice this.
Aug
22
comment Is it possible to not trigger my normal search highlighting when using search as a movement?
Haven't had a chance to fully explore this suggestion yet, but it may work and at least points me in the right direction. I'd say that deserves the bounty. :)
Aug
17
comment How can I stop Gmail from keeping me logged in after I close the browser?
@jjlin - although, as it turns out, if I also check "Browsing History", it does log me out. A bit of an extreme solution, though.
Aug
17
comment How can I stop Gmail from keeping me logged in after I close the browser?
I do not have it pinned.
Aug
17
comment How can I stop Gmail from keeping me logged in after I close the browser?
@martineau - I mentioned that in the question.
Aug
17
comment How can I stop Gmail from keeping me logged in after I close the browser?
@jjlin - the settings look fine. In Firefox on Mac, I just logged into Gmail, chose 'Quit Firefox', and verified in Activity Monitor that it's no longer running. Open it back up and I'm still logged in. Under Firefox > Preferences > Privacy, I have checked "Clear history when Firefox closes." In the "Settings" next to that, both "Cookies" and "Active Logins" (which I would have thought were session cookies) are checked.
Aug
17
comment How can I stop Gmail from keeping me logged in after I close the browser?
As it happens, I use Chrome and Firefox on Mac, Windows and Linux, depending on where I am. I currently care most about this behavior in Firefox for Mac.
Aug
15
comment How does Mac's command line compare to Linux?
Another thing I've discovered is that some programs one uses from the command line have small differences. For example, GNU find supports an exec option, but the default find on OSX doesn't.
Aug
15
comment Is it possible to not trigger my normal search highlighting when using search as a movement?
If there's no way to make this a default, is there a way to have an alternate search that doesn't highlight? Like, instead of c/foo, c//foo, where // is a non-highlighting search?
Jul
21
comment Must TCP use IP?
Correct - the first version of TCP included the functionality of IP. Maybe another reason why people say "TCP/IP" is that the vast majority of the time when you're sending data over IP, you want to guarantee that all of it gets delivered and in the right order, so you use TCP. For instance, all HTTP and FTP traffic uses TCP. One category of exceptions is real-time data; Skype, for instance, uses UDP, because you'd rather get the latest packet in a conversation than stop everything to get one that you missed.
Jun
29
comment Is there a fix for the “Too many open files in system” error on OS X 10.7.1?
Actually, my "heavy use" wasn't the issue; my settings for the maximum number of open files for the kernal and per-process were far lower than what the defaults should be.
Jun
22
comment Is there a fix for the “Too many open files in system” error on OS X 10.7.1?
@slhck - I have the same problem. The circumstances are basically "at random." I'm a developer, so I'm using my Mac fairly heavily: running one or more databases, a web server, testing tools, one or more browsers, and a music player all at once. Google Chrome seems to be one program that has a lot of files open.
Jun
7
comment How can I discard my undo history in vim?
That does work. Would you mind explaining it?
Jun
1
comment How can I do a recursive find and replace from the command line?
@DanielAndersson - It appears that you're correct; my Linux box can do the find... -exec version, but my Mac can't. sed - 's/foo/bar/g' does not work; -i is to provide a backup file extension, and giving it an empty string means 'don't back up.' The command in my answer works on both platforms.
May
25
comment How can I do a recursive find and replace from the command line?
@DanielAndersson - I seem to be getting different results on my work Mac and home Ubuntu machines, so I need to do some more tinkering before I update this answer. One note, though: the find... -exec method is interesting, but man find says to use '-execdir' instead for security reasons.
Apr
26
comment Is there a way to make my hard drive inaccessible to everyone but me?
One caveat when encrypting an existing unencrypted drive: if it's solid state, it may not be re-writing over the same sectors, because it varies them to extend the disk's life. So data on a solid state drive is really only safe if it was encrypted from the start.
Feb
27
comment Can I turn off Google Chrome's new prerendering?
@Dennis - Yes, I did quit the browser and open it again.
Feb
20
comment Can I encrypt data in a way that it can be read normally but can't be copied or edited?
@Barfieldmv - maybe true, but 1) streaming into a viewer app is a form of copying, 2) the remote desktop solution assumes there are no security holes there, 3) both of these are more difficult and more open to error than making a simple copy. If my hard drive is physically unavailable to you, I can guarantee you can't modify it. If you have some kind of network access, there's always a chance you know about a hack that I haven't guarded against.
Feb
20
comment Can a Yahoo employee read my email?
This is a fundamental and important truth about all cloud services. The only way to ensure that someone won't abuse your data is to not give them access: either don't store it with them, or encrypt it first and don't give them the key. All the laws and promises in the world may be overruled by a government demand, a hack, or simple employee dishonesty. It can be reasonable to trust a service with your data, but you should know that it really comes down to trust. And that trust may have to extend to third parties, including the government, who can legally (or illegally) demand access.