101 reputation
4
bio website hackcraft.net
location Dublin, Ireland
age 38
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Jun 27 at 2:11

When not programming I spend much of my free time avoiding the task of writing bios.

Currently having some fun with lock-free mutable collections at http://hackcraft.github.com/Ariadne/


Jun
6
comment How to ASCII-armor my public key without installing GPG?
+1 for conradpgp v1.0.
Jun
6
awarded  Commentator
Jun
6
comment What is the hexadecimal system?
Octal remains in use where grouping by sets of 3 bits is handy, an obvious case being the file access-rights flags. Relatedly relatively non-techie people will use hexadecimal with colour codes because it's similarly useful to group octets (sets of 8 bits) and having two hexadecimal digits does that nicely.
Jun
5
comment Why are special characters such as “carriage return” represented as “^M”?
Associated Press still use ANPA-1312 which uses 1–4, 6 & 16 are used to start every TCP/IP connection. Modern printers (among other thigns) still use 17 & 19. Together with those you mention, we've quite a percentage of them covered without really trying. I'll grant you they aren't in heavy use, but they ain't dead either.
Jun
5
comment Why are special characters such as “carriage return” represented as “^M”?
none of the control characters are meaningless. Many of them are unused in many contexts, but every single one has at least one meaning.
Jun
5
comment Why are special characters such as “carriage return” represented as “^M”?
@OlivierDulac ... U+000D is proleptic, since that name came with Unicode in the 1990s, but that does quite definitely reference the code as it existed in ASCII in 1963, anf through that as it existed in Murray's modified Baudot code in 1901. Murray was solving problems related to moving paper around, with the same tools used in the concept of "text file" many decades later. Hammer a screw into something like a nail, and it's still a screw. Use LF and/or CR to represent the end of a line in a text file, and they're still line-feeds and carriage returns.
Jun
5
comment Why are special characters such as “carriage return” represented as “^M”?
@OlivierDulac no, the ^M is exactly a carriage return, just like ^J is exactly a line-feed. While different OSs have had different views as to whether line-feed and/or carriage return or something else (like the Newline character used by some IBM characters but not part of ASCII and so not part of the historical heritage of some other OSs) should represent a new line in a text file, and while some programs have then overridden that in different ways, U+000D itself is still a carriage return, whatever later operating systems like Unix or DOS decided to do with it. (Of course, calling it...
Jun
5
awarded  Quorum
Jun
5
comment Why are special characters such as “carriage return” represented as “^M”?
@LatinSuD caret notation (and corresponding use of the Ctrl-key) relates to the C0 control set (historically part of ASCII) directly and not whether and how a given operating system or program uses part of that set in representing new lines, or anything else. Similarly, whether ^H deletes a character or allows overprinting (such as n^H~ as an obsolete way to produce ñ) or any other actual use of the control character is separate from the caret notation.
May
30
comment Can we associate ESC key to always close any type of program?
What are you going to use to replace ESC's original meanings?
Feb
13
awarded  Supporter
Jan
9
comment If 32-bit machines can only handle numbers up to 2^32, why can I write 1000000000000 (trillion) without my machine crashing?
@pabouk, agreed; it clearly isn't about address size, and the Z80 was the first chip I thought of too (childhood memories), though we could add that they'd be calling some 16-bit x86 chips 20-bit, some 32-bit x86 chips 36-bit, and with some chips having different addressing in different cases, perhaps splitting the difference?
Feb
8
comment Why don't websites immediately display their text these days?
Code to prevent the "flash of useful content", tends to prevent images appearing as well as text.
Jul
17
comment Must TCP use IP?
@kmkaplan Unless the datagram was printed on the label of the SDHC card. It's like the cliché from several films - "oh, it's actually ON the harddrive!"
Jul
17
awarded  Autobiographer