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Apr
7
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
25
comment Two identical external monitors, one through HDMI another VGA. Text on VGA looks blurry
@Craig yes. It was a DVI-I port on the monitor. And I discovered the problem when I noticed that one monitor didn't offer the same on screen menu as the second. For some unknown reason when I needed longer cables I bought DVI-I instead of the -D variant. The 2090 has one port of each type. necdisplay.com/p/desktop-monitors/lcd2090uxi-bk-1
Mar
25
comment Two identical external monitors, one through HDMI another VGA. Text on VGA looks blurry
@Craig I was using a pair of NEC 2090's (high end 1600x1200 LCD) side by side for almost 2 years before discovering that my computer/monitor had decided to use the analog link in the DVI-I cable for one of them instead of the digital link. NEC's top line of monitors have a very large price premium to cover using top quality parts everywhere. Even knowing one 2090 was on analog I couldn't see any quality difference between the two. For most consumer grade monitors the difference is much more visible. I have immediately noticed cases where 1 of 2 dell 1280x1024 monitors was analog.
Mar
25
comment Is it really possible for most enthusiasts to crack people's Wi-Fi networks?
@Sirex that article says the problem in WPA is with WPS (an optional easy button way to get new devices configured for a network) davidgo covered that in his answer.
Dec
8
awarded  Famous Question
Dec
6
comment What are these “notches” on the side of the PCI Express connector?
silkscreened on the board next to the lock is "core unlocker". My guess would be that it is either to try and use the 4th core on a 3 core cpu (AMD only) or to remove limits on how high the CPU can be overclocked (going from generally safe limits, to values that need sub-ambient cooling of the sort normally only used for competitive overclocking.) Unfortunately glare is obscuring most of the name on the board and Asus uses Formula branding in a number of high end models.
Nov
27
comment Why do some RJ45 plugs have the lock release clip under a rubber cover?
@MichaelKjörling OK, I've never had a cable with a boot stiff enough I wasn't able to work it with one finger pressing the boot/tab into the rest of the plug.
Nov
27
comment Why do some RJ45 plugs have the lock release clip under a rubber cover?
@MichaelKjörling I've never had a problem pulling a network cable from the back of a PC and am wondering if your system has an unusual io layout. Every one I've seen has put the network cable on the top (if the board was laid down flat) of a port stack with the tab side facing up. This makes it easy for me to grab the cable shortly past the socket while depressing the lock tab with a single finger. Booted or not has never factored into it; the rubber used is soft enough to easily squish down into the tab.
Nov
25
comment What is the PCI card that tells you what's wrong with the computer?
@sikas If it has a PCI slot you can connect it. The problem is that different boards use the numeric codes to mean different things; and unless there's a variant of the board with a 2 digit debug on the board the mobo vendor probably will not have published the POST codes anywhere. So you'll have codes but no way to translate them to specific errors. A lot of newer mobos don't have legacy PCI slots any longer; and I've yet to find a POST card for PCIe. Like ultrasawblade I'm also unaware of if UEFI boards generate codes like this at all.
Oct
29
awarded  Yearling
Oct
28
comment Building my own computer
Intel's current generation of CPUs 4xxx series use the LGA1150 socket. Unless you're bargain hunting for very low end system, there's no good reason to build an LGA1155 system any longer. I suspect your part list is being recycled from a few years ago; but it's well past the point that is needs to updated.
Oct
22
comment Can a printer print white color?
If you need to print white on a colored material other than a shirt you might have luck asking around at specialty shops that do art prints. You'll pay for the privilege; but to match the colors produced by painting they use printers with many more colors of ink than conventional models. To offer the ability to print on canvas (similar to the painting type), AIUI they'd need to include white among the colors of ink used.
Oct
15
comment How to destroy a CD/DVD rom safely?
The DOD approved CD grinder where I'm employed works on the label side, and AIUI destroys the reflective layer leaving a bare plastic disk. Adhesive labels need to be soaked off before it can be used. DVD capable models were much more expensive because the data's stored in the middle, so we don't have one that can do them.
Sep
23
comment What is the rationale behind using a third party uninstaller, when uninstalling applications on a Windows PC?
@Simon no, I wouldn't. That problem turned out to be a lot more of a mess than I suspected from attempted phone diagnosis; and since it happened a decade ago the laptop didn't have wifi built in so I couldn't hunt for a coffee shop to look for an automated cleanup tool and I badly underestimated how hard it was going to be. (Without Symantec Corporate installed and working Novel refused it access to the schools wired network.)
Sep
23
comment What is the rationale behind using a third party uninstaller, when uninstalling applications on a Windows PC?
@Simon actually I didn't, at the time I don't think I was aware of any free tools to do it. The QT issue I ignored since I was planning on a new system in the near future; and it wasn't annoying enough to risk breaking anything. The Norton/Symantec one I did the hard way: 3 hours manually scrubbing the registry and another 30 minutes doing the same on the file system. In that case the lack of internet access without a 4 hour round trip drive forced my hand; had I realized how much work was involved I probably would've used the recovery disk to do a clean OS install.
Sep
23
comment What is the rationale behind using a third party uninstaller, when uninstalling applications on a Windows PC?
I don't quite agree. Registry cleaners are 100% useless; 3rd party uninstall tools are only 99.9% useless. The difference is that the latter can be useful when the first party uninstall catastrophically fails for some reason and either aborts without uninstalling or fails messily breaking the system in the process. I've ran into each case once on XP systems: An Apple installer that insisted my admin accounts weren't and refused to uninstall, and a fiasco involving a user trying to install Symantec Corporate AV on top of Norton Home resulting in two crashing uninstallers and no internet.
Sep
23
comment What is the rationale behind using a third party uninstaller, when uninstalling applications on a Windows PC?
+1 for the last paragraph
Sep
23
comment Can PSU cause my PC to reboot?
@skiwi those specs definitely show it's the PSUs problem. 75% efficient, and barely able to putput half its power at 12V indicate a design that's about a decade old. A modern design should be able to put out at least 80% of its power at 12V; many of the newest ones are able to do >95% because almost everything in a new computer is powered off of 12V. And as I commented above, the 42A figure includes enough to power a much more power hungry CPU and a relatively large safety margin. superuser.com/questions/649001/can-psu-cause-my-pc-to-reboot/…
Sep
23
comment Can PSU cause my PC to reboot?
Bluntly, and ignoring that it's a recomendation for total PSU performance not the amount of power that the card itself draws (roughly half), that claim is crap. Numbers that high were created to give a decent lying specsheet crap PSU margin, at a time when high end CPUs were ~100-130W and the chipset on the motherboard easily did another 20-30W. Now they persist equally from ignorance and to sell bigger PSUs than needed.
Sep
23
comment Can PSU cause my PC to reboot?
@SinisterMJ that's only the way to go if your computer is normally operating at or near full load. If it spends most of its time near idle loads a smaller PSU will do better overall since you'll rarely be in or near the peak range. In addition, because efficiency curves are normally quite flat between about 20 and 80% load you're rarely looking at more than a few percent theoretical gain. My recommendation is generally full load +200W since that's enough of a margin to keep the PSU fan spinning at low speed and not adding to the systems fan noise while keeping idle power near a 20% load.