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  • 35 votes cast
Jan
26
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
30
comment Does using ECC DRAM memory require a certain CPU? why?
Besides the [hold] flag, an very satisfactory answer was anyway possible and done by @Hennes. Proofing effectivly that the question was answerable. It would henceforth be a nice act, if those who flagged the question as "unclear" would (1) read the answer and (2) consider the need to flag the question, thank you
Sep
30
comment Does using ECC DRAM memory require a certain CPU? why?
by your clear and concise answer you helped much understanding the question I raised. Indeed for doing so you provided some advanced knowlegde/insight not so readily available to me and made this question work. thank you for the response.
Sep
30
accepted Does using ECC DRAM memory require a certain CPU? why?
Sep
15
comment Does using ECC DRAM memory require a certain CPU? why?
@SamiKuhmonen true, but still I hope for a more informed answer, which would explain this to me a bit better. For instance the changes for bit errors are real, but not really that high. If the DRAM memory would be able to do the first, and by this even correct simple errors, it would already greatly reduce bit errors, even without need to involve the CPU.
Sep
15
asked Does using ECC DRAM memory require a certain CPU? why?
Sep
9
accepted What is the granularity of a hard disk URE (unrecoverable read error)?
Sep
9
comment What is the granularity of a hard disk URE (unrecoverable read error)?
"the catch" with the os drivers to give back (at request) all, even unverified data is a problem, as a non-windows user I asked about this specifically unix.stackexchange.com/questions/228254/…
Sep
9
comment What is the granularity of a hard disk URE (unrecoverable read error)?
@JamesRyan good hint, it can always be worse. Maybe I was simply inquiring about the least bad case possible (that is only to loose a sector, or as it partly was resolved in the good answers, a part of the sectors data, depending on the type inside of it). maybe knowing more about the genesis of unreadable errors (and their persistence i.e. random bit rot, vs. head crash impact) will have to be considered. But we want answerable questions here, so I did not needlessly complicate the question any more
Sep
8
comment What is the granularity of a hard disk URE (unrecoverable read error)?
my guess is that it's only mathematically impossible under the implicit assumption that there was no further redundance inside of the data, right? - and also great answer!
Sep
8
comment What is the granularity of a hard disk URE (unrecoverable read error)?
Is it still mathematically impossible if the data inside the 4096Byte payload was itself a compination of a 4000Bytes payload and another 96Byte ECC on top? (for instance because I was willing to sacrafice capacity for recoverablility in the data store layout?).
Sep
8
answered What is the granularity of a hard disk URE (unrecoverable read error)?
Sep
8
comment What is the granularity of a hard disk URE (unrecoverable read error)?
I tend to think this is a good answer, not because necessarily I agree that in case of an URE it is necessary to loose a sector (that is after all 4k of data) completetly, but because the hdd might discard even that share of the "bad sector" which would still be of value. The presentation of the SpinWrite arguments sustain this idea, so the answer also offers some more insight, great.
Sep
8
revised What is the granularity of a hard disk URE (unrecoverable read error)?
response to comment (though the comment was deleted in the meantime, its idea was taken up)
Sep
8
asked What is the granularity of a hard disk URE (unrecoverable read error)?
Sep
7
comment What is more likely? storage bit rot (e.g.URE) or ram memory bit rot?
@Psycogeek I appreciate your advice, and which hints on ways to avoid the need to answer the question. I am not ignorant to that advice, yet the question I did ask purposefully, and any way to avoid the question in the first place is not the best way to answer the question. Does the suggested estimation seem reasonable to you?
Sep
7
revised What is more likely? storage bit rot (e.g.URE) or ram memory bit rot?
simplified question title
Sep
7
asked What is more likely? storage bit rot (e.g.URE) or ram memory bit rot?
May
5
awarded  Necromancer
Feb
2
awarded  Custodian