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Jul
16
comment How resistant is BitLocker against brute force attacks on the 48 character recovery key?
@hbdgaf The divisible by 11 thing is a red herring. The recovery password is a randomly generated 128-bit key (probably AES, protecting a copy of the volume master key). It is divided into eight 16 bit numbers, each of which is multiplied by 11 to allow for the divisible by 11 check during entry. See: blogs.msdn.com/b/si_team/archive/2006/08/10/694692.aspx
Jul
15
comment How resistant is BitLocker against brute force attacks on the 48 character recovery key?
It's your answer.
Jul
15
comment How resistant is BitLocker against brute force attacks on the 48 character recovery key?
I find terms like "reasonably resilient", "a long time", "reasonable time frame" and "is a BEAST" to be so non-specific that they're of very little value. I would find something like this to be valuable: "A brute force attack on system X would be expected to succeed on average after Y attempts, with each attempt having cost Z."
Jul
15
comment How resistant is BitLocker against brute force attacks on the 48 character recovery key?
You have not provided any math to support your reasoning.
Jul
15
comment How resistant is BitLocker against brute force attacks on the 48 character recovery key?
@bitlocked You have not attempted to answer the questions asked.
Jul
15
awarded  Yearling
Jul
10
comment How resistant is BitLocker against brute force attacks on the 48 character recovery key?
That sounds like a cold boot attack and has nothing to do with a brute force attack on the recovery key.
Jul
10
comment Is it better to use Bitlocker or the built-in-drive-encryption that my ssd offers?
@Eddie For FDE solutions other than BitLocker that leverage AES-NI: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AES_instruction_set#Applications
Jul
10
revised Is it better to use Bitlocker or the built-in-drive-encryption that my ssd offers?
expanded answer
Jul
10
revised Is it better to use Bitlocker or the built-in-drive-encryption that my ssd offers?
minor tweaks
Jul
9
comment Is it better to use Bitlocker or the built-in-drive-encryption that my ssd offers?
I think that the worst thing that can be said about BitLocker is that the Elephant Diffuser was removed in Windows 8.
Jul
9
comment Is it better to use Bitlocker or the built-in-drive-encryption that my ssd offers?
@Cestarian It seems that encfs is not a full disk encryption product and bleachbit isn't an encryption product at all, it's a free space scrubber.
Jul
9
comment Is it better to use Bitlocker or the built-in-drive-encryption that my ssd offers?
@Cestarian Two encryption layers aren't necessarily better than one, either.
Jul
9
comment Is it better to use Bitlocker or the built-in-drive-encryption that my ssd offers?
@Cestarian You can't declare two encryption products equally good just because they use they same algorithm. You have to consider the mode of operation and many implementation details. One mistake can wreck the whole system.
Jul
9
answered Is it better to use Bitlocker or the built-in-drive-encryption that my ssd offers?
Jul
7
revised Install of Update for KB2862330 fails with error 800B0100
well...that never happened.
Feb
26
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
28
revised Incremental/Differential Backup on Windows
expanded answer
Jan
9
reviewed Reject Convincingly “breaking” a system for a non technical user
Dec
31
comment Windows 7 Update Failure 800B0100
@Boris_yo Can you elaborate on which of ZippyV's suggestions solved your problem?