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Sep
19
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Mac OS X logfile viewer
Sep
19
reviewed Approve suggested edit on I have to activate my win8 pro whenever I connect to the internet
Sep
18
reviewed Reviewed VBA Excel Macro that can append data from one row to another
Sep
18
awarded  Custodian
Sep
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How do I change default background windows color?
Sep
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How to manually adjust video card fan speed
Sep
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How can I always open certain URLs/domains in certain browsers?
Sep
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on New Windows 7 Libraries created keep disappearing
Sep
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How to create a custom Ubuntu alternate CD?
Sep
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Spoofing Firefox 4 User Agent without add-ons
Sep
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Win 7 - How to customize window colors?
Sep
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Updating the BIOS resulted in BSOD with 0x1c error code
Sep
18
reviewed Reviewed Save Ping Output in a text file
Sep
18
awarded  Custodian
Sep
18
reviewed No Action Needed Won't update windows, message says 'windows is out of date'
Sep
16
comment What's the best algorithm to secure erase HDD?
@Gael My point is not that you are wrong, but rather that you are not thinking like a paranoid person. Somebody paranoid enough to overwrite with random data is likely also to be aware of the principle of defense in depth.
Sep
12
comment What's the best algorithm to secure erase HDD?
@Gael Please do not presume to determine what kind of data others possess or its value to anybody. The matter at hand is how to obliterate data stored on a magnetic disk past the point recovery by any adversary, present or future. Perhaps a pass of zeros is sufficient. Since we are in the territory of paranoia, I submit that trusting the controller and the encoding scheme is not prudent and some cryptographic quality random data is in order. If unencrypted data has ever been present, total destruction may be necessary. I stand by my recommended strategy.
Sep
10
comment What's the best algorithm to secure erase HDD?
@Gael In this age of NSA spying, a little paranoia can be a healthy thing if you value your privacy. LCD screens are not immune to eavesdropping. Newer technology can give you an advantage defeating older technology. If you have data you don't want to ever be recoverable, don't worry about what the capabilities of your adversaries are today, worry about what their capabilities will be decades hence. Three letter agencies recruit some of the best engineers and they do not write papers about their work.
Sep
9
comment What's the best algorithm to secure erase HDD?
@Gael Technology gets better and black budgets can be virtually unlimited. Regardless, please go read my answer again, especially these two bits: "How paranoid do you want to be?" and "A three-letter-agency might have the capability to recover some data even after overwrites with patterns or random data. Or not. Who knows, they don't talk about their capabilities that I know of." I think the case can be made that overestimating your opponents is less likely to screw you than underestimating them. If you choose to wield Occam's Razor I won't say you are wrong, just that you are not paranoid.
Sep
9
comment What's the best algorithm to secure erase HDD?
@Gael I am presuming a Three Letter Agency may have capabilities and successes they do not brag about.