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  • 17 votes cast
Nov
14
awarded  Yearling
Oct
20
asked Putty (SSH) browser plugin?
Oct
18
accepted No >256MiB RAM DIMM for Dell Latitude CPx?
Oct
18
comment No >256MiB RAM DIMM for Dell Latitude CPx?
Thanks Chris S.
Oct
18
asked No >256MiB RAM DIMM for Dell Latitude CPx?
Oct
7
answered Is kernel a process?
Oct
6
asked Dell D630 speaker/microphone->headset jack converter?
Jan
14
accepted Windows registry entry for swapping tilde/backtick and escape keys?
Jan
14
comment Control-Backspace (unix-kill-rubout) for readline?
Hi, .inputrc actually says unix-kill-rubout, I don't know why I kept thinking it was unix-kill-word. Regardless, it still just asks like regular backspace.
Jan
14
revised Control-Backspace (unix-kill-rubout) for readline?
Misnamed.
Jan
14
asked Control-Backspace (unix-kill-rubout) for readline?
Dec
29
comment Linux: obtain current # of jiffies since reboot
Appears as though any given time delta is not consistent with a sum across the /proc/stat!
Dec
29
revised Linux: obtain current # of jiffies since reboot
added 671 characters in body
Dec
29
accepted Linux: obtain current # of jiffies since reboot
Dec
29
comment Linux: obtain current # of jiffies since reboot
How does one activate the timer_stats? Correct, the 'jiffies' is an arbitrary increment in this case as long as the various /proc/PID/stat files report a metric that is equivalent to some total I can use to calculate relative %s. OK, so there is a "jiffies" line in /proc/timer_list, I'll update original post.
Dec
29
comment Linux: obtain current # of jiffies since reboot
Right, but to find the total # of jiffies since start, would one not do something like awk '/^cpu/{print $2+$3+$4+$5}' /proc/stat?
Dec
29
comment Linux: obtain current # of jiffies since reboot
Is this not only for user time for which the cpu was scheduled? The others being nice, system & idle?
Dec
29
asked Linux: obtain current # of jiffies since reboot
Dec
28
comment Why can't Unix users renice downwards?
Should we not consider nice values [-20,-1] to be system priorities vs. the user 'space' [0,19] I get what you're saying but I'm of the recent persuasion that user processes should be able to re-prioritize themselves or their children...at least from a base priority set by root?
Dec
28
comment Why can't Unix users renice downwards?
Not necessarily. For instance, user renice could not drop below 0.