101 reputation
2
bio website zero-separation.com
location Watford, United Kingdom
age 37
visits member for 6 months
seen 10 hours ago

A professional programmer and systems architect with many years of experience in technologies ranging from Java and SQL through to NoSQL, C, C++, Python and many many more.


Feb
27
comment If 32-bit machines can only handle numbers up to 2^32, why can I write 1000000000000 (trillion) without my machine crashing?
@Firee That depends what you mean by "crash", but in general no number should cause a crash. Numbers too large can cause all sorts of odd effects but what those effects are would depend entirely on how the program is storing them and what they are doing with them.
Jan
24
comment how to use two different versions of java in the same computer?
Running through web start I don't think you can, you have to run in whatever version of Java they have installed.
Jan
18
awarded  Supporter
Jan
9
comment If 32-bit machines can only handle numbers up to 2^32, why can I write 1000000000000 (trillion) without my machine crashing?
True, that can. However that is not the format people mean when they say "float", which usually refers to a 32bit floating point number as stored and used by standard floating point processors in current computers.
Jan
9
answered how to use two different versions of java in the same computer?
Jan
9
answered Java NullPointException - Error while initializing managers
Jan
9
awarded  Autobiographer
Jan
9
comment If 32-bit machines can only handle numbers up to 2^32, why can I write 1000000000000 (trillion) without my machine crashing?
Actually that is mostly correct but not quite. A 32 point floating point number is unlikely to be able to accurately represent 1000000000000. It will represent a number very very close to the desired number but not exactly it.