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seen Apr 15 at 4:55

No, I don't know what orthogonal means.


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answered Emacs doesn't fully maximize in Linux Slackware
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accepted Linux-Mint Maya Mate loses Alt-F1 menu and Alt-F2 run-dialog with Compiz
Nov
2
comment Linux-Mint Maya Mate loses Alt-F1 menu and Alt-F2 run-dialog with Compiz
Thanks Bojan. I works nicely, and I find it behaves better with this following extra bash step to focus it: mate-run; sleep .1; xdotool windowactivate $(wmctrl -lx | sed -nr 's/^([^ ]+).* mate-panel.Mate-panel .* Run Application/\1/p')
Oct
23
comment ffmpeg an image sequence
You can do it with Symbolic Links to your list of files... Have a look at this link to give you an idea: Sort images by aspect ratio
Sep
22
answered Linux-Mint Maya Mate loses Alt-F1 menu and Alt-F2 run-dialog with Compiz
Sep
11
comment Interpreting regular expressions using find in Linux confusion
When the shell's pre-processing is done with, and find has received its parameters (internally), find too may need to have some characters escaped.. For example, make 2 files. One has an asterisk in its name; touch foo'*'foo foo-bar .. now let's try 2 variants of a find command. 1. find -maxdepth 1 -name foo\* or 'foo*' will find both files.. 2. find -maxdepth 1 -name foo\\*\* or 'foo\**' will find only foo*foo .. For more info: man bash (or, for more detail info bash), otherwise try Unix&Linux, or just google the terms
Sep
11
comment Interpreting regular expressions using find in Linux confusion
find is not related to the shell in any way, other than that the shell is the user interface which allows you to run such a program. A unix style shell has added features which affect the command-line. When you run find, you not only need to consider what parameters find needs, but you also need to consider how to present those parameters to bash. ie. There are two layers to consider. Escaping something, per se, has no magic to it. The issue is: For a given situation, do I need to protect/ something, so that it won't be subject to special shell pre-processing?