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visits member for 4 years, 9 months
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Long-time Informix user and developer, experienced in C and Unix (many variants). Email: [email protected]

Jan
13
comment cron and at are not working
@tekknolagi: For 'at', I note that man at includes: IMPLEMENTATION NOTES Note that at is implemented through the launchd(8) daemon periodically invoking atrun(8), which is disabled by default. See atrun(8) for information about enabling atrun. When I tried on my system, at queued the job OK, but the jobs did not run. That was when I really read the man page! (When I did what man atrun said, my previously queued at requests ran at the next minute boundary.)
Jan
13
comment cron and at are not working
For the format of crontab entries, try man 5 crontab.
Dec
15
comment How do I change the default prompt from “#” to “>”?
Note that it is conventional to keep a # in the prompt to remind you that you are playing with fire because you have root privileges and any mistakes can completely wreck the machine. You should always do as little as possible while running as root.
Sep
6
comment How to Suppress Repetition of Warnings That an Application Was Downloaded From the Internet on Mac OS X?
FWIW: the article shows how to write an AppleScript script that will run "xattr -d com.apple.quarantine" on the newly downloaded item. It places the script with the appropriate name in the appropriate location so that the unquarantine operation happens 'automatically'. The article (tagged 10.5 only, but meaning 10.5 or later) is still there today.
Aug
17
comment How to recover file from 'hidden' directory with Time Machine?
I've now got 8.5.3.CD5 (an internal pre-release). It is working for me once more (on both MacOS X 10.7 this morning and 10.7.1 this afternoon). I tried an 8.5.2 version and it had troubles. It might easily have been the problem diagnosed in the tech note you reference, though; the description sounds plausible. Thanks for the information; it strongly indicates I was running into a real problem, not something I'd created for myself (other than by upgrading to Lion).
Aug
14
comment How to recover file from 'hidden' directory with Time Machine?
I managed to recover the backup file, and it made no difference to the misbehaviour of Notes. So, I've probably got some problem with Java (again) on MacOS X Lion. But I am not sure what changed between the date when it worked and the date when it didn't.
Aug
12
comment How to recover file from 'hidden' directory with Time Machine?
@Bill: your last question shows why the fragmentation of the sites was a disaster -- there isn't a single place to look for the answers to questions, thus making it much, much harder to work out where to look. I've not been to the Apple site before - that's apple.stackexchange.com, I suppose?
Aug
12
comment How to recover file from 'hidden' directory with Time Machine?
I like the 'back to blissful ignorance' part of this! I suspect that 'defaults delete com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles' might be better than setting it to 'NO' given that the flag is not set at all locally before I started on the changes.
Aug
12
comment How to recover file from 'hidden' directory with Time Machine?
@Bill: possibly not - I debated, and decided to ask where there are the most eyes. I go to SU maybe once a month, if I'm feeling diligent.
Jul
26
comment When copying folders with sudo it copies just the first level of folder's hierarchy
+1: Or you could try 'sudo chown -R me /c/d'.
Jul
12
comment Removing some types of files recursively
There's no real point in using anything other than the -print0 and -0 options; the other doesn't work correctly if the names contain newlines (and that is a valid character in a Unix file name). Similarly with the IFS hack. Note that these are GNU-specific (though eminently sensible) extensions to the standard.
Jul
12
comment Removing some types of files recursively
Not a reliable technique; all else apart, xargs splits names at blanks. You might use find . -name "*.exe" -print0 | xargs -0 rm -f, where the -print0 ends file names with ASCII NUL and the -0 means that xargs reads names ending with ASCII NUL. Note that these are GNU-specific (though eminently sensible) extensions to the standard.
Jul
12
comment Removing some types of files recursively
@camh: follow the link to the POSIX documentation; -delete is not included. It is in GNU find; the question is for Linux; so it is possible to use -delete. However, all the world is not Linux, and a portable answer maybe of use.
Jun
27
comment Insert at line number with 1 command in VIM
In that case, you need to expand your answer to explain what you mean, because it is not entirely clear to me what you do mean; I've not encountered vimscript before, but I only use vim as a souped-up vi, not making full use of the incredible complexities it has added.
Jun
27
comment Insert at line number with 1 command in VIM
This is actually one character shorter than the original; well done.
Jun
27
comment Insert at line number with 1 command in VIM
This is the same number of characters typed as if you invert the order of the 'enter' and 'i' as in the question.
Jun
27
comment Insert at line number with 1 command in VIM
This is about how to do programming with a particular tool; it is within scope for SO.
Jun
27
comment Insert at line number with 1 command in VIM
That doesn't look shorter than the original.
Jun
22
comment sudo chmod -R 777 /
777 permissions are almost never the answer to any permissions problem. It might get you past a hiccup, but it is seldom a good idea, even when restricted to a directory deep in your disk system. It is a catastrophe when applied to all files and directories under root, not least because it attempts to remove SUID bits from programs such as 'sudo' that need them. Don't do it again! (Many Unix users can regale you with a story of an analogous mistake; I won't bother you with mine, but the backups of the system saved the day, and it wasn't me who typed the command that achieved the rm -fr /.)
Jun
20
comment What is a “pipe” and how can it be “broken”?
pr -e4 -n ten-thousand-lines.c | sed 10q ends up with a broken pipe. Whether pr bothers to tell you that it got the SIGPIPE signal is another matter; it may well simply exit as a result of the signal (generating a non-zero exit status).